The Anonymous Widower

Coeliacs On A Gluten-Free Diet And The AstraZeneca COVID-19 Vaccine

I am coeliac and I am on a strict gluten-free diet.

I have not had a serious dose of Covid-19, but I may have had a very mild dose, after a meeting with about twenty Chinese students, that I described in Did I Have A Close Brush With Covid-19?

That would not be possible to check now, but I did have a bad reaction after my AstraZeneca vaccine, which I wrote about in July 2021 in Hay Fever, Coeliac Disease And The AstraZeneca Covid-19 Vaccine. I also told my GP about it and he said he’d heard similar tales.

I had no reaction to my second AstraZeneca vaccine.

This year my hay fever was even worse. Is this due to my immune system being boosted by the vaccines?

Yesterday, at a funeral, I met an old friend, who is on a strict gluten-free diet and she had not had a serious dose of Covid-19. But like me, she did have a serious reaction to her first dose of the AstraZeneca vaccine.

I’d like to hear any experiences of coeliacs on a gluten-free diet during the pandemic.

September 28, 2022 Posted by | Health | , , , | 2 Comments

Coeliac Disease And Atrial Fibrillation

I am 75 and coeliac and I had or have atrial fibrillation. Cardiologists tell me that, the atrial fibrillation led to my stroke in 2011.

I should also say, that my father was an undiagnosed coeliac and he died from a stroke younger than I am now.

I typed the title of this post into Doctor Google.

I found this paper on Cureus, which is entitled Celiac Disease and Risk of Atrial Fibrillation: A Meta-Analysis and Systematic Review.

I will show two paragraphs from the Abstract,

This is the Introduction.

Several studies have found celiac disease may be associated with a variety of cardiac manifestations. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is one of the most common arrhythmias that can cause significant morbidity. However, the risk of atrial fibrillation in patients with celiac disease according to epidemiological studies remains unclear. The aim of this meta-analysis study is to assess the risk of atrial fibrillation in patients diagnosed with celiac disease compared to controls.

And this is the Conclusion.

A significant association between celiac disease and risk of atrial fibrillation was reported in this study. There is a 38% increased risk of atrial fibrillation. Additional studies are needed to clarify the mechanistic link between atrial fibrillation and celiac disease. Some of the limitations of this study are that all were observational studies, some were medical registry-based and there was high heterogeneity between studies.

One of the paper’s conclusions is more research needs to be done.

I know that I have a supercharged immune system, in that it seems to protect me from flu and the dreaded covids and it gave the AstraZeneca vaccine a good kicking. Research from Nottingham University has also shown, that coeliacs on a gluten-free diet have a 25 % lower risk of cancer compared to the general population.

So I asked Doctor Google if there was any link between the immune system and atrial fibrillation.

I found this paper on PubMed, which is entitled The Role Of Immune Cells In Atrial Fibrillation.

This was the Abstract.

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia, but its mechanisms are poorly understood. Recently, accumulating evidence indicates a link between immune response and AF, but the precise mechanism remains unclear. It should be noticed that the relationship between immune response and AF is complex. Whether immune response is a cause or a result of AF is unclear. As the functional unit of the immune system, immune cells may play a vital role in the immunological pathogenesis of AF. In this review, we briefly highlight the evidence on relationships between immune cells and AF, and discuss their potential roles in AF pathogenesis. We hope this review could provide new orientation and enlightenment for further research on AF mechanism.

One of the paper’s conclusions is more research needs to be done.

Conclusion

I feel a lot of research concerning coeliacs, their immune systems and atrial fibrillation should be done and this could lead to a better understanding of atrial fibrillation.

 

September 28, 2022 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Cummins Shows Hydrogen Internal Combustion-Engined Concept Truck At IAA Transportation Exhibition

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Commercial Motor.

These are the first two paragraphs.

Cummins believes hydrogen internal combustion engines (H2-ICE) will be suitable for the 10- to 26-tonne GVW range, and showed a concept vehicle at the IAA Transportation exhibition.

The truck, which is based on a Mercedes-Benz Atego 4×2, is fitted with Cummins’ new 6.7-litre B6.7H engine. It is rated at 290hp, has a peak torque of 1,200Nm, and a range of up to 500km.

Alison Trueblood, Cummins executive director – on-highway business Europe, is extensively quoted in the article and it is worth reading what she says.

I believe that by providing a hydrogen infrastructure and converting trucks to hydrogen, by using similar techniques to Cummins could be a quick and effective way to improve air qualities in urban areas.

September 21, 2022 Posted by | Health, Hydrogen, Transport/Travel | , , , | Leave a comment

Ease Up IPA Goes Gluten Free!

The title of this post, is the same as that of this page on the Adnams web site.

I am now 75 and I have been drinking Adnams beer, almost exclusively since I was thirteen.

My father introduced me to halves of Adnams bitter, whilst playing snooker at Felixstowe Conservative Club.

Part of his logic behind doing this was to teach me to drink alcohol responsibly, like he did and to prevent me ending up like his father, who was a drunk, who died before the age of forty.

The other thing, that my father’s teaching did was give me a preference for good real ale. And especially Adnams!

As I write this, I’m drinking a bottle of their 0.5 % Ghost Ship.

8. Voila!

I drink it for three reasons.

  • Obviously, I like the taste.
  • It is low-alcohol, so it doesn’t affect the action of the Warfarin, that stops me having another stroke.
  • I also find, that because the beer is made with low amounts of barley to keep the alcohol low, it doesn’t affect my gut, despite the fact that I’m a coeliac.

I have yet to find a low-alcohol beer, that has had an adverse effect on my body.

But Will Ease Up Be Safe For A Coeliac To Drink?

These paragraphs describe how Ease Up is brewed and the testing of the product.

When producing Ease Up, we now use an enzyme called Clarex® which breaks down gluten-type proteins, reducing gluten content to below 20 parts per million (ppm). Only foods that contain 20ppm or less can be labelled as ‘gluten-free.’ According to Coeliac UK, research shows people diagnosed as coeliac can consume products with gluten present at or less than this level, but customers are advised to consider their own individual tolerances.

Clarex® is added in the fermentation vessel, where it mixes well during a normal, vigorous fermentation. Our beer is tested at the end of fermentation and then, after packaging, it is put on hold while it undergoes a thorough external validation process before it is confirmed gluten free and released. Just look out for the new, updated branding.

Note the phrase about individual tolerances.

Conclusion

It looks like Adnams have produced the ideal real ale to have in your pub, club or house, if you have some coeliac customers, family  or friends.

Never did I think, I would ever write about disruptive innovation in the brewing industry.

September 7, 2022 Posted by | Food, Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Statins Are Not To Blame For Most Muscle Pain, Scientists Conclude

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on The Times.

This is the first two paragraphs, that outlines the study.

Fears over statin side effects are unfounded as they only lead to muscle pain in 1 per cent of patients, a comprehensive study has shown.

University of Oxford scientists say they have “definitively” proven wrong the widespread belief that statins are a common cause of muscle symptoms.

Can my experience, add anything to the argument?

  • I am seventy-five years, 170 cms. in height and weigh just over sixty-two kilograms.
  • I have been taking statins, at least since I had my stroke ten years ago.
  • I have been diagnosed with arthritis in my left knee. I put this down to the fact, that my wife and I had three small children fifty years ago and lived in a fifth-floor flat with no lift. All the carrying up the stairs damaged the knee and it flares up every ten years or so!
  • I have constant minor pain in my left humerus, which was broken by the school bully, when I was fourteen.
  • When I was diagnosed as a coeliac and went gluten-free, a lot of my muscle and joint pains were reduced.
  • The pain levels seem to have risen again since going on statins.

This page on the NHS web site is an overview of Coeliac Disease.

In a section, which is called Who’s Affected?, this is said.

Coeliac disease is a condition that affects at least 1 in every 100 people in the UK.

But some experts think this may be underestimated because milder cases may go undiagnosed or be misdiagnosed as other digestive conditions, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

Reported cases of coeliac disease are around 3 times higher in women than men.

I also believe that the number of diagnosed coeliacs, is also affected by the fact that there was no test for coeliac disease in children until 1960 and that a reliable genetic test wasn’t available until the 1990s. This will lead to numbers of undiagnosed coeliacs in the older population.

Coincidence Or Just Facts?

Note that statin side effects only lead to muscle pain in one per cent of patients according to the report in The Times and one per cent of the population are coeliac.

Conclusion

I’m no medic, but I am a coeliac and an analyser of data. I believe that better analysis of the data may add some new insight.

For instance, as coeliac disease is three times higher in women, then if it is involved, then it would mean that the muscle pain ratios will have a sex component.

I also believe, that all medical research databases, should record, whether the participants are coeliacs.

 

August 29, 2022 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | 1 Comment

Who Needs A Spoonful Of Sugar?

This article on The Times is entitled Lie Right To Help The Medicine Go Down.

These are the first two paragraphs of the article.

Next time you take an aspirin, try speeding up its effect by lying on your right. But don’t turn over, or you could be waiting a long time for pain relief.

Scientists have modelled the dynamics of the stomach in an attempt to understand how posture can affect drug absorption.

Strangely, I generally lie on my right.

In my life, I have done a lot of mathematically modelling of all sorts of systems.

It has surprised me several times how unexpected the results have been.

August 10, 2022 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Vitamin B12 For Stroke Recovery: Understanding The Benefits & Safety Tips

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on the FlintRehab web site.

I have posted the link, as I was talking to a doctor earlier and they might like to look at it.

Consider.

  • I am coeliac on a strict gluten-free diet.
  • Since the coeliac diagnosis in 1997, I have had a B12 injection every three months.
  • I had a serious stroke ten year ago.
  • Some doctors feel, I have made an excellent recovery from my stroke.

Could my regular B12 injections have aided my recovery?

Note, that I have cleaned up the Vitamin B12 tag in this blog.

July 26, 2022 Posted by | Food, Health | , , , | Leave a comment

I Was Struggling In The Heat

Early last week, I was struggling in the heat.

On Wednesday, I had my three-monthly B12 injection injection and since then I’ve been feeling a lot better.

Yesterday, when I went to see the Oxted Viaduct, I climbed a couple of short hills in the heat and had no problem.

I have my B12 injections because I’m coeliac and I was at one time low on B12.

Given too, that some web sites report than B12 helps stroke recovery, does that explain, why I made a better than some recovery from my stroke?

At least three doctors, I’ve met, have used the word remarkable when talking about my stroke recovery.

I certainly would create a fuss, if the GP, thought I should stop taking B12. But then I’ve been taking it for at least thirty years.

July 17, 2022 Posted by | Health | , , , , | 2 Comments

Do I Need To Have A Booster Polio Vaccination?

Polio seems to have returned and cases are rising in North-East London, where I live.

I was vaccinated using an injecton in the 1950s, so it must have been the Salk vaccine.

In today’s Sunday Times, there is an article, which is entitled A Little More Vaccination: Elvis Presley And The Race To Beat Polio, where this is said.

Sabin’s live vaccine could be swallowed as a drop on a sugar cube. This mimics the route that the virus takes naturally, entering the body’s gut. Salk’s dead virus had to be injected. Most importantly, it turned out that Sabin’s vaccine could give lifelong immunity, while Salk’s only protected for a few years.

As it is more than a few years, since I was vaccinated, do I need a booster?

June 26, 2022 Posted by | Health | , | 7 Comments

Canary Wharf Boosts Its Science Ambitions

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on The Times.

This are the introductory paragraphs.

Genomics England is to move its headquarters to Canary Wharf in east London this year as the financial quarter aims to become a life sciences hub.

The government-run DNA sequencing group will move in the autumn into One Canada Place, where its neighbours will include Brookfield, a Canadian property fund, and Reach, publisher of the Daily Express and OK! magazine.

Owned by the Department of Health and Social Care, Genomics England sequences the genomes of people with rare diseases and cancers to help doctors to treat them more effectively. With consent, some of that data is passed to researchers trying to develop new drugs and treatments.

If you type “Canary Wharf Science Hub into Google”, you find some serious articles.

This article in the FT is entitled Canary Wharf Proposes £500mn Lab Project To Reinvent Financial Hub.

This is a good idea, as scientist friends are always complaining about a lack of lab space in Cambridge and Oxford. Because of the Elizabeth Line, both these cities are not much more than an hour from Canary Wharf.

It should also fill the cafes and shops with scientists and engineers, who would replace some of those working from home because of the pandemic.

I wonder whether this model will work elsewhere?

 

June 16, 2022 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment