The Anonymous Widower

Housing Approved For Northern Line Extension Building Site

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on IanVisits.

This is the introductory paragraph.

A worksite in Kennington currently being used for the Northern line extension is set to be redeveloped as a mixed residential and light industrial estate. TfL bought the plot of land in 2012 as a worksite for the Northern line extension, as the access shaft for the tunnelling and permanent ventilation are close by.

This surely, is the way to build developments in a crowded city to incorporate the necessary ventilation shaft.

This development will provide 139 new rental homes and more than 2,700 sqm of light industrial workspace, in a partnership between the developer and Transport for London.

January 8, 2021 Posted by | Transport | , , , | Leave a comment

Northern Line Extension ‘On Track’ For 2021 Opening

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Transport Network.

I’m looking forward to using the line in the Autumn.

This map from cartometro.com, shows the track layout of the extension.

 

Note.

  1. The extension starts from the existing Kennington Loop at Kenning station.
  2. There is an intermediate station at Nine Elms.
  3. As with many two-platform stations, there is a cross-over in the approach. It is shown in a picture in the article.

Hopefully, the extension will eventually be extended to Clapham Junction.

Step-Free Interchange At Kennington Station

I have been worried about this and from the comment of others like Melvyn, I am not alone.

This map from cartometro.com, shows the track layout at Kennington station.

Note.

  1. Elephant and Castle station is at the North-East corner of the map and is on the Bank branch of the Northern Line.
  2. The pair of tracks going North-West are the Charing Cross branch of the Northern Line.
  3. The pair of tracks going South-West are the Morden branch of the Northern Line.
  4. Trains going South  to Morden can use either Platform 2 or 4, depending, whether they have come Charing Cross or Bank.
  5. Trains going North  from Morden can use either Platform 1 or 3, depending, whether they are going to Charing Cross or Bank.
  6. The Kennington Loop allows trains from Charing Cross that arrive in Platform 2 to go direct to Platform 1 to return to the North.
  7. There appears to be a revering siding, which can also reverse trains from either Platform 2 or 4 and send them North from Platform 1 or 3.
  8. Chords South of the platforms allow trains to and from Charing Cross to access the tracks to Morder and the reversing siding.
  9. The Battersea Power Station branch, is shown in dotted lines and connects to the Kennington Loop.

I took these pictures at Kennington station today.

Note.

The platforms are in two pairs, which are connected by walk-through passages, with Platforms 2 and 4  for Southbound trains and Platforms 1 and 3 for Northbound trains.

  1. Each platform has a proper clock.
  2. The only access to the pair of platforms is by steep long stairs.
  3. The stairs need to be rebuilt with proper handrails on both sides.
  4. The last picture shows the handrails at Moorgate station.

Currently, the system allows journeys between the North and Morden, either directly or with a walk-across change at Kennington station.

  • Going South to Morden, if you get a train, that reverses at Kennington, you would wait for a train to turn up on either Platform 2 or 4, that is going the whole way.
  • Going North from Morden, if you get a train going to the wrong Northern destination, you would get off at Kennington and wait for a train to turn up on either Platform 1 or 3, that is going to the destination you desire.

What is needed on all platforms, is more comprehensive information displays.

  • Displays on Platforms 2 and 4, would show details of all Southbound trains. whether they terminated at Kennington or went to Morden, or in future went to Battersea Power Station station.
  • Displays on Platforms 1 and 3, would show details of all Northbound trains.

Displays would indicate destination and time as now, but with the addition of platform, where you catch the train.

If there is one problem it is taking a train between Battersea Power Station and Morden stations.

This public domain drawing from the Internet shows the station, after the Kennington Loop had been built in the 1920s and 1930s.

Note.

  1. We are looking from the North.
  2. The Kennington Loop at the far end of the station.
  3. The four platforms of the station numbered 2, 4, 3 and 1 from left to right.
  4. The stairs between the two pairs of platforms, leading to overbridges.
  5. The lift tower and a spiral staircase leading to and from the surface.

I can now sum up the step-free status of the station.

  • Passengers entering or leaving the station, must walk up or down a staircase like that shown in the first picture.
  • Passengers needing to change to another train going in the same direction, just walk across to the other platform in the pair.
  • Passengers needing to change to another train going in the opposite direction, as they would going between Battersea Power Station and Morden stations, will need to climb one set of stairs and descend another.

It does appear that in an ideal world lifts will need to be added.

Thoughts On Future Step-Free Access At Kennington Station

In the future, it is planned that the Northern Line will be split into two lines.

  • Battersea Power Station and Edgware
  • Modern and High Barnet

Will this increase the number of passengers, who need to do the opposite direction change, as there will just be more trains running on all branches?

Alternative Step-Free Access

But, there may be another way to go between Battersea Power Station and Morden stations.

  • Take a train from Battersea Power Station to Waterloo.
  • Walk across the platform at Waterloo to the Southbound platform.
  • Take a train from Waterloo back to Kennington.
  • Walk across from Platform 2 at Kennington to Platform 4.
  • Take the first train from Platform 4 to Morden.

The reverse journey between Morden and Battersea Power Station stations would be.

  • Take a train from Morden to Kennington.
  • Walk across from Platform 3 at Kennington to Platform 1
  • Take a train from Platform 1 to Waterloo.
  • Walk across the platform at Waterloo to the Southbound platform.
  • Take the first train from Waterloo to Battersea Power Station.

Note,

  1. Both routes have two changes; one at Kennington and one at Waterloo,
  2. All changes are step-free.
  3. All changes are very simple

It should also be noted that Battersea Power Station, Nine Elms and Waterloo are all or will be fully step-free stations.

The two routes I have outlined have one big advantage. They already exist and the only costs would be training of staff and indicating the routes to passengers.

January 6, 2021 Posted by | Transport | , , , , , | 2 Comments

TfL Reveals Project Cost Spikes And Delays

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Construction News.

This is the introductory paragraph.

Transport for London (TfL) has revealed how the coronavirus pandemic has increased costs and delayed the completion of some of its biggest projects.

Points from the article include.

  • TfL still aim to complete the Northern Line Extension by Autumn 2021, but there has been a 64-day delay caused by the covids.
  • The cost of the Bank station upgrade has risen by £88 million after a nine-week covids delay.
  • The Barking Riverside Extension of the Overground is in serious trouble.

On top of that there are all the problems with Crossrail.

 

October 27, 2020 Posted by | Transport | , , , , | Leave a comment

Northern Line Extension Around Kennington Station – 10th July 2020

I took a trip to Kennington this afternoon to look at the sites of the Northern Line Extension around Kennington station.

These pictures show Kennington station.

It appears work is still proceeding inside the station to complete the extra passageways.

This Google Map shows the station.

As the hoardings seen in Braganza Street were not there this afternoon, have the builders finished the major works at the station?

I then walked to the site in Kennington Park, where there is a construction site, where they are building a headhouse.

This page on the TfL web site gives more details.

I took these pictures of the site today.

There does seem to be work to do, but I’ve no idea how much.

This Google Map shows the site.

If the shaft under the headhouse, is covered by the green cover, it’s not going to be enormous.

Finally, I walked to Kennington Green, where they are building another headhouse.

This page on the TfL web site gives more details.

I took these pictures of the site today.

It looks like the new concrete building on the far side of site will be clad in bricks to fit in with the houses.

This Google Map shows the site.

It does appear to be a very different design to the other site.

But there is still some time to go.

 

July 10, 2020 Posted by | Transport | , | 1 Comment

Battersea Power Station To Outshine Typical Tourist Attraction Sites In The UK

The title of this post is the same as this article in the New Straits Times.

This is the first paragraph.

Malaysia-owned Battersea Power Station project is expected to outshine many prime property developments in London after seeing a 36 per cent capital appreciation for units offered under its first phase.

The article goes on to give an interesting view on how Malaysian investors and tourists see London.

On Tourism

This is a paragraph.

It is expected that when it opens, 40 million people will visit Battersea Power Station annually.

That is around 109,000 visitors for every day of the year.

Will the Northern Line Extension and the roads cope?

On Investment

This is two paragraphs.

“London is never going to be cheap. Those who wanted to invest, better do it now. A lot of people from overseas have already started investing in London,” he added.

Mason said London would still remain attractive place for investors globally due to its higher capital returns for the property sector.

Londoners like me, don’t look on their City as an investment, but as an exciting and fulfilling place to live.

 

 

 

 

July 14, 2019 Posted by | Transport, World | , , , | 2 Comments

London’s Northern Line Extension To Battersea Delayed By A Year

The title of this post is the same as that of this article in the Financial Times.

This is a paragraph.

People close to the project believe that TfL will announce in the new year that the completion date is being pushed back until September 2021.

This delay will heap more financial woes on Transport for London.

Transport for London have already postponed these important upgrades.

  • The resignalling of the Piccadilly Line.
  • The rebuilding of Camden Town station.
  • The rebuilding of Holborn station.

I believe that on financial grounds, the Mayor must reverse his fare-freeze as soon as possible.

December 21, 2018 Posted by | Transport | , , | Leave a comment

Progress On The Northern Line Extension Shafts

This article on IanVisits is entitled London Railway Upgrades – A Progress Report.

This is said about the Northern Line Extension.

The enclosure over the Kennington Green shaft, which protected nearby residents from noise, dust and light pollution from the tunnelling works has been removed, enabling construction of the new headhouse and subway.

This Google Map shows the location of the two shafts at Kennington Green and Kennington Park.

Note the two barn-like green buildings, one of which is labelled Kennington Green.

These pictures, which were taken today, show the site of Kennington Green shaft.

And these show the site of the Kennington Park shaft.

Note.

  1. The Kennington Green site appears to be nearer to completion, than the Kennington Park site.
  2. They are asking the public to vote on the options for the brick cladding for the headhouse.

It would appear that the headhouse at Kennington Park will be incorporated in a public building.

June 27, 2018 Posted by | Transport | , , | Leave a comment

Projekt U5

Projekt U5 is Berlin’s latest extension to the U-Bahn network.

In the excellent project description on this Internet, it is described as a Gap Closure.

The project “gap closure U5” connects the traditional line U5 from Hönow to Alexanderplatz with the U55 between Alexanderplatz and Brandenburger Tor. It includes the construction of a 2.2 kilometer tunnel stretch and three new underground stations: Rotes Rathaus, Museumsinsel and Unter den Linden.
It looks like it is about the same size of London’s Northern Line Extension.
  • Berlin U5 Missing Gap – 3 stations – – 3.22 km.- €525 million
  • Northern Line Extension – 2 stations – 2.2 km. – £560 million

Both projects are for completion in 2020.

The Berlin U5 seems to have better hoardings.

 

 

February 12, 2018 Posted by | Transport | , , | Leave a comment

First Train Tries Out New Northern Line Extension Track

The title of this post is the same as this article on IanVisits.

Ian says this.

The very first train has travelled on the extension of the Northern Line to Nine Elms and Battersea.

Two new junctions which will connect the extension to the existing Northern Line have now been completed, and the first train to travel over them was photographed on New Year’s Day.

As other reports say that more track will be installed, I wonder how far the train actually went!

 

January 14, 2018 Posted by | Transport | , | Leave a comment

Tunnelling Complete On Northern Line Extension

The title of this post is the same as that of this article on Global Rail News.

This is said in the Wikipedia entry for the Northern Line Extension To Battersea.

The main tunnelling started in April 2017.

So as it’s now November 2017, the tunnellers have performed like a Jack Russell after a rabbit.

I do think that this excellent performance might give Transport for London ideas for some new passenger or train tunnels under London.

November 8, 2017 Posted by | Transport | , , | Leave a comment