The Anonymous Widower

Longhedge Junction Speed Increases

London has a rail capacity problem, for both freight and passenger trains.

This report from Network Rail is entitled The London Rail Freight Strategy (LRFS).

One of the secondary recommendations of the report is to increase speed through Longhedge junction.

The report explains it like this.

There is an opportunity to enhance Longhedge Junction, a key location for freight passing through the Battersea area, to enable higher speeds and provide faster transit between the South London Line and West London Line or Clapham Junction (for the Brighton Main Line or Windsor lines).

This would benefit the numerous freight flows through this important part of the network, where two orbital routes connect to each other and to radial routes in and out of London to the south and south-west.

London Overground SLL services running to and from Clapham Junction would also benefit from an increase to the existing 25mph line speed through Longhedge Junction.

This map from cartometro shows the location of Longhedge junction.

Note.

  1. The orange and black tracks are London Overground routes.
  2. The Overground route going East is the Dalston Junction and Clapham Junction service that goes via the South London Line (SLL).
  3. The Overground route going West is the Stratford and Clapham Junction service that goes via the West London Line (WLL).
  4. The two Overground routes combine to run into the Overground platforms at Clapham Junction.
  5. There is a double-track route, that links Latchmere 1 junction on the West London Line with Longhedge junction on the South London Line.
  6. Longhedge junction is in the East of the map.

It is an area congested with train tracks and junctions.

Traffic Through Longhedge Junction

Longhedge junction is busy, with the following trains in a typical hour.

  • Four tph between Dalston Junction and Clapham Junction stations.
  • Up to six assorted  freight tph.

Note that services run in both directions.

But this Google Map of the are gives hope.

Longhedge junction is to the West of the West of the tracks running North South and it looks like there could be plenty of space to realign the tracks and improve the junction.

As with Nunhead Junction, which I wrote about in Nunhead Junction Improvement, it could be that the use of electric haulage on freight trains through the junction with their more nimble acceleration might help.

Conclusion

This appears to be a serious problem.

What it needs now is a well-designed scheme to speed freight and passenger trains through the junction.

Related Posts

These are related posts about the London Rail Freight Strategy (LRFS).

Decarbonisation Of London’s Freight Routes

Doubling Harlesden Junction

East Coast Main Line South Bi-Directional Capability

Gauge Improvements Across London

Gospel Oak Speed Increases

Headway Reductions On The Gospel Oak To Barking, North London and West London Lines

Heavy Axle Weight Restrictions

Kensal Green Junction Improvement

Moving The West London Line AC/DC Switchover To Kensington Olympia

Moving The West London Line AC/DC Switchover To Shepherd’s Bush

Nunhead Junction Improvement

Stratford Regulating Point Extension

Will Camden Road Station Get A Third Platform?

Will Clapham Junction Station Get A Platform 0?

 

June 26, 2021 - Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , , ,

16 Comments »

  1. […] Longhedge Junction Speed Increases […]

    Pingback by Nunhead Junction Improvement « The Anonymous Widower | June 26, 2021 | Reply

  2. […] Longhedge Junction Speed Increases […]

    Pingback by Stratford Regulating Point Extension « The Anonymous Widower | June 26, 2021 | Reply

  3. […] Longhedge Junction Speed Increases […]

    Pingback by Doubling Harlesden Junction « The Anonymous Widower | June 26, 2021 | Reply

  4. […] Longhedge Junction Speed Increases […]

    Pingback by Moving The West London Line AC/DC Switchover To Kensington Olympia « The Anonymous Widower | June 26, 2021 | Reply

  5. […] Longhedge Junction Speed Increases […]

    Pingback by Headway Reductions On The Gospel Oak To Barking, North London and West London Lines « The Anonymous Widower | June 26, 2021 | Reply

  6. […] Longhedge Junction Speed Increases […]

    Pingback by Moving The West London Line AC/DC Switchover To Shepherd’s Bush « The Anonymous Widower | June 26, 2021 | Reply

  7. […] Longhedge Junction Speed Increases […]

    Pingback by Will Camden Road Station Get A Third Platform? « The Anonymous Widower | June 26, 2021 | Reply

  8. […] Longhedge Junction Speed Increases […]

    Pingback by Kensal Green Junction Improvement « The Anonymous Widower | June 26, 2021 | Reply

  9. […] Longhedge Junction Speed Increases […]

    Pingback by Will Clapham Junction Station Get A Platform 0? « The Anonymous Widower | June 26, 2021 | Reply

  10. Hi, I think this problem is a continuation from pre-grouping days company rivalry. Battersea bridge needs to be increased to four or even six tracks, and pointwork rationalised with larger radius switchouts. I have read many commentators in the prewar years noting the lack of north-south rail capacity due to company reluctance to share paths between rival systems. Clearances were different between companies then, and it was never resolved. Perhaps the new Hammersmith Bridge could be moved to incorporate a rail crossing. City authorities in the 1840’s stopped cross London railways being built, now everyone is suffering the result of shortsited development.

    Comment by jagracer | June 26, 2021 | Reply

    • Thanks! Very interesting.

      I do think though, that Network Rail are very good at getting the maximum out of tracks these days, if you look at what they’ve done recently on the Midland Main Line and the Great Eastern Main Line. For the past half century or so, a lot of track improvement was pulling out tracks to save on maintenance. All of these junction improvements in the LRFS are aimed at improvements in capacity and/or speed. I know what would motivate me, as an engineer.

      I also believe improvements like digital in-cab signalling and electric locomotives equipped and sized to the trains running in London will make a strong contribution.

      Comment by AnonW | June 26, 2021 | Reply

  11. […] Longhedge Junction Speed Increases […]

    Pingback by Gauge Improvements Across London « The Anonymous Widower | June 26, 2021 | Reply

  12. […] Longhedge Junction Speed Increases […]

    Pingback by Gospel Oak Speed Increases « The Anonymous Widower | June 27, 2021 | Reply

  13. […] Longhedge Junction Speed Increases […]

    Pingback by East Coast Main Line South Bi-Directional Capability « The Anonymous Widower | June 27, 2021 | Reply

  14. […] Longhedge Junction Speed Increases […]

    Pingback by Heavy Axle Weight Restrictions « The Anonymous Widower | June 27, 2021 | Reply

  15. […] Longhedge – Longhedge Junction Speed Increases […]

    Pingback by Decarbonisation Of London’s Freight Routes « The Anonymous Widower | June 28, 2021 | Reply


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: