The Anonymous Widower

East Coast Main Line South Bi-Directional Capability

London has a rail capacity problem, for both freight and passenger trains.

This report from Network Rail is entitled The London Rail Freight Strategy (LRFS).

One of the secondary recommendations of the report is to use the bi-directional capability of the East Coast Main Line to create another freight route through London.

The report explains it like this.

The southern end of the East Coast Main Line, from Kings Cross to Stoke Tunnel (about five miles south of Grantham), is due to be the first part of a national main line to be fully converted to European Train Control System (ETCS) digital signalling.ETCS, because it does not rely on fixed lineside equipment facing one way or another, is bi-directional by nature.

This presents an opportunity for freight to make use of a new routeing at the southern end of the East Coast Main Line, which current signalling and track layout do not permit.

This strategy therefore proposes installing new track layout features that would facilitate this routeing for freight trains, enabling them to take advantage of the bi-directional capability brought about through ETCS deployment.

The main expected change would be the creation of a facing crossover at Bowes Park, to enable southbound freight trains to run onto the Down Enfield Viaduct in the up direction, before continuing onwards to the terminal at Ferme Park or accessing the Gospel Oak-Barking Line at Harringay.

This example shows an advantage of digital in-cab signalling.

This map from cartometro, shows the lines between Bowes Park and Alexandra Palace stations.

Freight trains coming from the North regularly take the Hertford Loop Line and arrive in North London at Bowes Park

Currently, they sneak down the Eastern side of the East Coast Main Line and then take a route across London, which probably uses the North London Line.

What is proposed is that with an extra crossover just South of Bowes Park station, freight trains will crossover and take Enfield Viaduct the wrong way to the Western side Alexandra Palace station.

The Enfield Viaduct is the track taken from Alexandra Palace station to Bowes Park station, by trains going to Enfield. It takes a bit of a loop to the West.

This second map from cartometro, shows the lines South of Alexandra Palace stations.

Note.

  1. Hornsey is the next station to the South of Alexandra Palace.
  2. The Eastern side of the East Coast Main Line is crowded with maintenance depots for trains.
  3. The orange line is the Gospel Oak to Barking Line.

By the use of digital signalling a new freight route through North London can been created.

Conclusion

How many other places can this technique be used?

Related Posts

These are related posts about the London Rail Freight Strategy (LRFS).

Decarbonisation Of London’s Freight Routes

Doubling Harlesden Junction

Gauge Improvements Across London

Gospel Oak Speed Increases

Headway Reductions On The Gospel Oak To Barking, North London and West London Lines

Heavy Axle Weight Restrictions

Kensal Green Junction Improvement

Longhedge Junction Speed Increases

Moving The West London Line AC/DC Switchover To Kensington Olympia

Moving The West London Line AC/DC Switchover To Shepherd’s Bush

Nunhead Junction Improvement

Stratford Regulating Point Extension

Will Camden Road Station Get A Third Platform?

Will Clapham Junction Station Get A Platform 0?

June 27, 2021 - Posted by | Transport | , , , , , ,

14 Comments »

  1. […] East Coast Main Line South Bi-Directional Capability […]

    Pingback by Will Camden Road Station Get A Third Platform? « The Anonymous Widower | June 27, 2021 | Reply

  2. […] East Coast Main Line South Bi-Directional Capability […]

    Pingback by Gospel Oak Speed Increases « The Anonymous Widower | June 27, 2021 | Reply

  3. […] East Coast Main Line South Bi-Directional Capability […]

    Pingback by Gauge Improvements Across London « The Anonymous Widower | June 27, 2021 | Reply

  4. […] East Coast Main Line South Bi-Directional Capability […]

    Pingback by Longhedge Junction Speed Increases « The Anonymous Widower | June 27, 2021 | Reply

  5. […] East Coast Main Line South Bi-Directional Capability […]

    Pingback by Nunhead Junction Improvement « The Anonymous Widower | June 27, 2021 | Reply

  6. […] East Coast Main Line South Bi-Directional Capability […]

    Pingback by Stratford Regulating Point Extension « The Anonymous Widower | June 27, 2021 | Reply

  7. […] East Coast Main Line South Bi-Directional Capability […]

    Pingback by Doubling Harlesden Junction « The Anonymous Widower | June 27, 2021 | Reply

  8. […] East Coast Main Line South Bi-Directional Capability […]

    Pingback by Moving The West London Line AC/DC Switchover To Kensington Olympia « The Anonymous Widower | June 27, 2021 | Reply

  9. […] East Coast Main Line South Bi-Directional Capability […]

    Pingback by Moving The West London Line AC/DC Switchover To Shepherd’s Bush « The Anonymous Widower | June 27, 2021 | Reply

  10. […] East Coast Main Line South Bi-Directional Capability […]

    Pingback by Kensal Green Junction Improvement « The Anonymous Widower | June 27, 2021 | Reply

  11. […] East Coast Main Line South Bi-Directional Capability […]

    Pingback by Heavy Axle Weight Restrictions « The Anonymous Widower | June 27, 2021 | Reply

  12. […] East Coast Main Line South Bi-Directional Capability […]

    Pingback by Headway Reductions On The Gospel Oak To Barking, North London and West London Lines « The Anonymous Widower | June 27, 2021 | Reply

  13. […] East Coast Main Line South Bi-Directional Capability […]

    Pingback by Will Clapham Junction Station Get A Platform 0? « The Anonymous Widower | June 27, 2021 | Reply

  14. […] East Coast Main Line South Bi-Directional Capability […]

    Pingback by Decarbonisation Of London’s Freight Routes « The Anonymous Widower | June 28, 2021 | Reply


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.