The Anonymous Widower

Service Provision On The Levenmouth Rail Link

The reinstated Levenmouth Rail Link, will have two stations; Leven and Cameron Bridge.

According to this section in Wikipedia, which is entitled Service Provision, this will be the service.

The expected level of services is two trains per hour between Leven railway station and Edinburgh Waverley. Both will call at Cameron Bridge. One train will travel via Kirkcaldy and along the coast, while the other train will travel via Dunfermline along the inner Fife Circle Line.

In the Wikipedia entry for Leven station, it says that the service will take just over an hour.

Consider.

  • Services between Edinburgh and Glenrothes with Thornton take about an hour whether the go via Kirkcaldy or Dunfermline.
  • The current timings are based on Class 158 or Class 170 diesel trains.
  • If as I surmise in Trains On The Levenmouth Rail Link, the trains are battery-electric Class 385 trains, these trains with their electric power will at least match the schedules of the diesel trains.
  • Network Rail will design the track layout at Thornton junction, so that trains will clear the junction efficiently.
  • Glenrothes with Thornton station is only half a mile from Thornton Junction.
  • Leven station is only 5.9 miles from Thornton Junction.

I can see battery-electric trains moving smoothly and quietly up and down the Levenmouth Rail Line and around Thornton junction to provide a very efficient service to Edinburgh.

Could we even see trains from Edinburgh take this route?

Edinburgh, Haymarket, Edinburgh Gateway, Dalmeny, North Queensferry, Inverkeithing, Dalgety Bay, Aberdour, Burntisland, Kinghorn, Kirkaldy, Cameron Bridge, Leven, Cameron Bridge, Glenrothes with Thornton, Cardenden, Lochgelly, Cowdenbeath, Queen Margaret, Dunfermline,  Dunfermline Town, Rosyth, Inverkeithing, North Queensferry, Dalmeny, Edinburgh Gateway and Haymarket.

Note.

  1. A second service would run in the opposite direction.
  2. Trains would reverse and the drivers would change cabs at Leven station.
  3. Trains would charge batteries on the Levenmouth Rail Link and at Edinburgh.
  4. Every station on the route would get two trains per hour (tph) in both directions.

The hourly service between Edinburgh and Cowdenbeath could continue.

The Bridges Across The Firth Of Forth

There would be a battery-electric train every thirty minutes in both directions  across the Forth Bridge.

This Google Map shows the three bridges across the Firth of Forth.

Note.

  1. The most Westerly bridge is the  Queensferry Crossing, which carries the M90 and was opened in 2017.
  2. The bridge in the middle is Forth Road Bridge, which opened in 1964.
  3. The Forth Bridge is the most Easterly bridge and it opened in 1890.
  4. North Queensberry station is to the North of the bridge and Dalmeny is to the South.

After opening of the Levenmouth Rail Link, there could be a battery-electric train every thirty minutes in both directions  across the Forth Bridge.

This sounds like an opportunity to develop the bridge with its battery trains as a tourist attraction.

Battery-electric trains could run from Edinburgh to the following places.

  • Dundee
  • Perth
  • St. Andrews

And that’s just for starters.

Conclusion

There is a lot more to the Levenmouth Rail Link, than just a double-track railway to Leven, as it enables so much.

Related Posts

The New Leven Station On The Levenmouth Rail Link

The New Cameronbridge Station On The Levenmouth Rail Link

North From Thornton Junction

Trains On The Levenmouth Rail Link

Whisky Galore!

 

 

 

 

 

July 28, 2021 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , , , , | 11 Comments

Forth Road Bridge In Trouble

The Forth Road Bridge has not been in the best of health for some years. Wikipedia has a section called Structural Issues and this is said.

2003 saw an inspection programme launched (at a cost of £1.2 million) to assess the condition of the bridge’s main suspension cables after excessive corrosion was discovered in a number of older bridges in the United States of a similar design and size. The study, which was completed in 2005, found that the main cables had suffered an estimated 8-10% loss of strength. Future projections highlight the likelihood of an accelerating loss of strength, with traffic restrictions to limit loading required in 2014 in the worst-case scenario, followed by full closure as early as 2020.

But now a different problem has arisen, as is reported in this article of the BBC. This said.

The Forth Road Bridge is to be closed until the new year because of structural faults, Transport Minister Derek Mackay has said.

This morning, there were long tailbacks on alternative routes.

It strikes me that this part of Scotland is in for not a very good Christmas.

At least the Forth Rail Bridge is its usual sturdy iconic self and I suspect that can cope with a few extra shuttle trains to help take the pressure of the roads.

December 4, 2015 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , | Leave a comment