The Anonymous Widower

A Hydrogen Mobility Roadmap For North-West England

In the last few days, the North West Hydrogen Alliance has published a document entitled A Hydrogen Mobility Roadmap.

Some information from a well-written and very informative document.

Vehicle Types Covered In The Roadmap

A composite picture at the start of the document shows the following hydrogen-powered vehicles.

  • A double-deck bus.
  • A heavy goods vehicle.
  • A passenger car.
  • A passenger train.

Other vehicles, which exist or are under development, could have been added.

  • A refuse truck.
  • A high capacity fork lift or dump truck.
  • A freight locomotive.
  • The availability of hydrogen fuel in an area, must encourage the use of hydrogen-powered vehicles.

Comparison Of Electric And Hydrogen

The document gives a comparison between electric and hydrogen power.

Speed Of Refuelling

  • Electric – The current long duration of battery recharges rules out many forms of transport
  • Hydrogen – Hydrogen refuelling speed is largely similar to current petrol and diesel fuelling

Distance On Single Charge/Tank

  • Electric – At the present time, cars will travel 150-250 miles per charge, but current battery weight means they are unsuitable for HGVs
  • Hydrogen – Vehicles can travel 500+ miles on a single tank of hydrogen, which can be scaled up to suit vehicle size

Availability Of Fuel

  • Electric – Growing network of charge points, but this is creating problems for power networks
  • Hydrogen – Only 12 refuelling stations in the UK

Availability Of Vehicles

  • Electric – Various cars to choose from, buses and trains readily available, with HGVs and ships in development
  • Hydrogen – Cars, buses and trains largely available. HGVs and ships in development

Note.

  1. The speed of refuelling and the range for hydrogen.
  2. The need for more hydrogen refuelling stations.
  3. Both battery and hydrogen ships are in development.

I think their points are fair.

Road, Rail And Marine

The document discusses the various modes of transport and how hydrogen can help, with respect to both carbon-emissions and pollution.

The Alstom Breeze Trains

This picture is a visualisation of the Alston Breeze.

This is said about the Alstom Breeze trains.

Alstom in Widnes is ready to deploy its new Breeze trains and is working with Northern Rail to identify routes that are suitable for conversion to hydrogen.

A map also shows hydrogen train symbols on the Liverpool and Manchester Line, that goes via Widnes and Warrington and conveniently passes the Alstom factory at Widnes.

I wonder, if we’ll see an acceleration of this project?

Consider.

  • Northern Rail is now directly controlled by the Government.
  • Some Class 321 trains for conversion, will surely be available this summer.
  • The updating of the trains, except for the hydrogen system has been developed in the Renatus project.
  • Alstom have the experience of the successful hydrogen-powered Alstom Coradia iLint from Germany.
  • Supplying the Alstom factory with hydrogen, shouldn’t be too difficult.
  • I doubt any extra infrastructure is needed to run the trains.
  • Alstom have sold two or three fleets of iLints on the back of a successful introduction into service of two prototype trains.

I don’t think, Alstom and all the various partners and stakeholders would object if the project were to be accelerated.

What’s Already Happening In The North West?

These hydrogen-powered projects are mentioned.

  • Twenty double-deck buses for Liverpool City Centre.
  • Alstom Breeze trains.
  • storengy refuse trucks for Cheshire.
  • ULEMCo are converting trucks and ferries.
  • Port of Liverpool air quality.

It does seem to be that if you give an area a hydrogen network, possible users will find ways to use it to their advantage.

Rising To The Challenge

This section answers these questions.

Where Will The Hydrogen Come From?

Initially from INEOS at Runcorn, where I used to work around 1970 and BOC at St. Helens.

How Will It Be Transported?

Mainly by innovative use of new and existing pipelines.

How Do We Get To Critical Mass?

It looks like they’ll start slowly with hydrogen from Runcorn and St. Helens and build from there.

I would add a further question.

Will They Be Adding Hydrogen Filling Stations To The Network?

The North West needs them!

Hydrogen Storage

This is said about storing hydrogen.

Geologically, Cheshire is one of the few places in the UK where major underground gas storage in salt caverns has been delivered, paving the way for potential hydrogen storage, which is already done at scale elsewhere.

When I worked at ICI, I was given a tour of one of salt caverns. One is rumoured to be large enough to enable a full-size replica of Salisbury cathedral to be built inside.

Research

This is said about research.

Esteemed universities, and a wealth of innovative research companies, mean the region can deliver new hydrogen technologies. With academia working side-by-side with industry, the North West’s institutions can equip the next generation of skilled workers to support the hydrogen economy.

As a graduatev of one of those esteemed universities, how can I disagree?

Carbon Capture And Storage

This is said about carbon capture and storage.

Offshore reservoirs in the East Irish Sea can store carbon dioxide (CO2) produced from hydrogen production. Carbon Capture Utilisation and Storage (CCUS) is essential technology to help the UK in its fight against climate change. CCUS can capture up to 95% of the CO2 emissions associated with producing hydrogen from natural gas.

Whether you want to produce hydrogen this way is another matter. But the oil refineries and chemical plants along the Mersey are surely prime candidates for CCUS.

An Alliance

Not for nothing is the project called the North West Hydrogen Alliance!

Sixteen partners are mentioned at the end of the document.

 

May 8, 2020 - Posted by | Transport | , , , , , , , ,

4 Comments »

  1. It is possible to mitigate battery recharge times by designing the vehicle to support rapid battery removal/replacement; within about 10 minutes during working day.

    Apparently this has already been done with one model of EV bus using a roof mounted battery and an automatic mechanical exchanger (no more complex than an automatic car wash) but advancements of batteries has meant this is less necessary. But could be relevant for fork lifts, rubbish trucks or any vehicle operated on a fleet depot basis.

    For transport, one could foresee bigger operators with multiple depots having an excess of battery tractor units used part day and swapped as needed for charging. This would cause some excess mileage, complex routings and extra driver hours, but not unsupportable. Will need large capital investment in tractors, depot space, and electrical power connection (as seen in London for the EV bus depot near Waterloo for central london single decker interstation routes).

    Comment by MilesT | May 9, 2020 | Reply

  2. […] A Hydrogen Mobility Roadmap For North-West England, I wrote using the trains around […]

    Pingback by Orders For Alstom Breeze Trains Still Expected « The Anonymous Widower | May 10, 2020 | Reply

  3. Related…Asda buys EV grocery delivery vans. Only using these for shorter runs e.g. onsite/offsite click and collect (presumably equipped with electric hookup for running thw chillers on arrival), not longer multimile 6-8 hour delivery missions (I suspect the chillers would reduce the range unacceptably over a longer mission, with current battery tech and van layout leaking too much chill enroute and at each stop)

    https://www.retail-week.com/grocery/asda-launches-electric-vehicle-fleet-to-increase-online-delivery-capacity/7034794.article

    Comment by MilesT | May 11, 2020 | Reply

  4. […] Runcorn is involved in hydrogen plans for North-West England, that I wrote about in A Hydrogen Mobility Roadmap For North-West England. […]

    Pingback by Surplus Electricity From Wind Farms To Make Hydrogen For Cars And Buses « The Anonymous Widower | May 18, 2020 | Reply


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