The Anonymous Widower

WyRefueler—The Mobile Hydrogen Filling Station

The title of this post, is the same as that of the product page on the Wystrach web site.

This is the introductory paragraph.

It’s transportable, energy-efficient, and user-friendly: the WyRefueler is here! The mobile hydrogen refueling station is suitable for wide range of refueling applications. Besides filling trucks, buses, and trains with hydrogen, it can be used for vehicles on construction sites, in ports, or at airports. The WyRefueler enables emission-free logistics and intralogistics—and there’s no limit to where it can be deployed!

It looks a sensible concept, but it is only a tank system, without an electrolyser.

It would surely be ideal for a company to trial a few hydrogen vehicles, before deciding on a permanent installation.

September 7, 2020 Posted by | Hydrogen | | Leave a comment

Are Fuel Cell Generators The Future For RVs?

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Hydrogen Fuel News.

It surely is an interesting concept to go and explore the great outdoors in a vehicle that pollutes what you are enjoying.

But hydrogen power solves the problem!

July 16, 2020 Posted by | Transport | | 4 Comments

JCB Unveils World’s First Hydrogen Digger

The title of this post is the same as that of this article on International Vehicle Technology.

The signs have been there for some time.

  • JCB are one of the backers of ITM Power, who make large scale electrolysers in Rotherham.
  • Jo Bamford has a hydrogen company called Ryse.
  • Jo Bamford took over Wrightbus and is saying he’ll be building thousands of hydrogen buses a year.
  • Ryse have planning permission for a giant hydrogen electrolyser at Herne Bay.

To me, it is totally logical, that JCB build a hydrogen-powered digger.

And it appears they have got there first!

July 2, 2020 Posted by | Hydrogen | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Hydrogen To Become A Source Of Cleaner Power On A Massive Scale

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Power Technology.

This is the introductory paragraph.

Hydrogen is light, storable, energy-heavy and does not produce direct carbon emissions or greenhouse gases (GHG). Sectors such as soil refining, ammonia production, methanol production and steel production use hydrogen extensively. Hydrogen will likely play a crucial role in clean energy transition with an increase in its use in sectors such as transportation, buildings and power generation. Interest in the use of hydrogen technology is increasing in a range of niche transport market segments, besides other applications. In the short to medium term, hydrogen technology could be used to replace compressed natural gas (CNG) in some areas with minor changes to the existing infrastructure.

The article is very much a must-read.

June 24, 2020 Posted by | World | , , , | Leave a comment

Two UK GDNs Considering New Fleet Of Zero-Emission Hydrogen Vehicles

This title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Hydrogen Fuel News.

This is the introductory paragraph.

Two UK gas distribution networks (GDNs) are investigating the potential of operating fleets of zero-emission hydrogen vehicles. The goal would be to use H2 fuel to shrink the carbon output from their fleet, aligning with the UK government’s Net Zero 2050 targets.

This surely is a good idea, as it says all the right things to their customers.

June 18, 2020 Posted by | Transport, World | , , | Leave a comment

Gas Network Operators And Energy Suppliers Urge Government To Promote Hydrogen-Fueled Recovery

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Business Green.

This is the introductory paragraph.

In a letter to Chancellor Rishi Sunak, Siemens Energy, Engie, National Grid, and Ryse Hydrogen call for the government to emulate its successful approach to offshore wind development and set an official cost reduction target for green hydrogen.

I think they’re right.

There has also been lots of comment in recent days on The Times web site arguing for more hydrogen.

Points from the Business Green article include.

  • Develop a policy  for carbon capture, usage and storage (CCUS), that was promised in its manifesto.
  • Carbon capture and storage would allow the production of zero-carbon blue hydrogen from natural gas.
  • The signatories have £900 million ready to invest in a zero-carbon gas grid in the UK.
  • Plans will be unveiled before the COP26 conference.
  • More emphasis by government on hydrogen buses and HGVs is needed.

The government and the gas industry must work together to deliver an economy, that is as near to zero-carbon as possible.

 

June 12, 2020 Posted by | Transport, World | , , , , , | 1 Comment

BMW: Fuel Cell Electric Drive Trains Could Become Our Fourth Pillar

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on H2 View.

BMW have released this video.

Could this be a significant moment in the future of motoring?

Since the 1970s, BMW have led motoring with advanced vehicles and this seems to be following that trend.

As they say in the video, hydrogen is well suited for SUVs and longer ranges.

Ihope this vehicle is a success, as it could change the colour of personal motoring in a big way!

June 9, 2020 Posted by | Transport | , , | Leave a comment

New Hydrogen Refuelling Company To Drive A Greater Adoption Of Fuel-Cell Cars

The title of this post is the same as that of this article in the Telegraph.

This is the introductory paragraph.

Hydrogen delivery and fuel-cell power took a step forward this week with the announcement of a new hydrogen-gas refuelling company. ITM Motive will run its parent company ITM Power’s existing eight filling stations with plans for more. Time will tell how much of a step it is, but the creation of this new renewable refuelling subsidiary should have enough credentials to vastly improve the prospects for fuel-cell cars, trucks, trains and buses in the UK.

Does this move, explain the rise in the share price?

May 15, 2020 Posted by | Transport | , | Leave a comment

A Hydrogen Mobility Roadmap For North-West England

In the last few days, the North West Hydrogen Alliance has published a document entitled A Hydrogen Mobility Roadmap.

Some information from a well-written and very informative document.

Vehicle Types Covered In The Roadmap

A composite picture at the start of the document shows the following hydrogen-powered vehicles.

  • A double-deck bus.
  • A heavy goods vehicle.
  • A passenger car.
  • A passenger train.

Other vehicles, which exist or are under development, could have been added.

  • A refuse truck.
  • A high capacity fork lift or dump truck.
  • A freight locomotive.
  • The availability of hydrogen fuel in an area, must encourage the use of hydrogen-powered vehicles.

Comparison Of Electric And Hydrogen

The document gives a comparison between electric and hydrogen power.

Speed Of Refuelling

  • Electric – The current long duration of battery recharges rules out many forms of transport
  • Hydrogen – Hydrogen refuelling speed is largely similar to current petrol and diesel fuelling

Distance On Single Charge/Tank

  • Electric – At the present time, cars will travel 150-250 miles per charge, but current battery weight means they are unsuitable for HGVs
  • Hydrogen – Vehicles can travel 500+ miles on a single tank of hydrogen, which can be scaled up to suit vehicle size

Availability Of Fuel

  • Electric – Growing network of charge points, but this is creating problems for power networks
  • Hydrogen – Only 12 refuelling stations in the UK

Availability Of Vehicles

  • Electric – Various cars to choose from, buses and trains readily available, with HGVs and ships in development
  • Hydrogen – Cars, buses and trains largely available. HGVs and ships in development

Note.

  1. The speed of refuelling and the range for hydrogen.
  2. The need for more hydrogen refuelling stations.
  3. Both battery and hydrogen ships are in development.

I think their points are fair.

Road, Rail And Marine

The document discusses the various modes of transport and how hydrogen can help, with respect to both carbon-emissions and pollution.

The Alstom Breeze Trains

This picture is a visualisation of the Alston Breeze.

This is said about the Alstom Breeze trains.

Alstom in Widnes is ready to deploy its new Breeze trains and is working with Northern Rail to identify routes that are suitable for conversion to hydrogen.

A map also shows hydrogen train symbols on the Liverpool and Manchester Line, that goes via Widnes and Warrington and conveniently passes the Alstom factory at Widnes.

I wonder, if we’ll see an acceleration of this project?

Consider.

  • Northern Rail is now directly controlled by the Government.
  • Some Class 321 trains for conversion, will surely be available this summer.
  • The updating of the trains, except for the hydrogen system has been developed in the Renatus project.
  • Alstom have the experience of the successful hydrogen-powered Alstom Coradia iLint from Germany.
  • Supplying the Alstom factory with hydrogen, shouldn’t be too difficult.
  • I doubt any extra infrastructure is needed to run the trains.
  • Alstom have sold two or three fleets of iLints on the back of a successful introduction into service of two prototype trains.

I don’t think, Alstom and all the various partners and stakeholders would object if the project were to be accelerated.

What’s Already Happening In The North West?

These hydrogen-powered projects are mentioned.

  • Twenty double-deck buses for Liverpool City Centre.
  • Alstom Breeze trains.
  • storengy refuse trucks for Cheshire.
  • ULEMCo are converting trucks and ferries.
  • Port of Liverpool air quality.

It does seem to be that if you give an area a hydrogen network, possible users will find ways to use it to their advantage.

Rising To The Challenge

This section answers these questions.

Where Will The Hydrogen Come From?

Initially from INEOS at Runcorn, where I used to work around 1970 and BOC at St. Helens.

How Will It Be Transported?

Mainly by innovative use of new and existing pipelines.

How Do We Get To Critical Mass?

It looks like they’ll start slowly with hydrogen from Runcorn and St. Helens and build from there.

I would add a further question.

Will They Be Adding Hydrogen Filling Stations To The Network?

The North West needs them!

Hydrogen Storage

This is said about storing hydrogen.

Geologically, Cheshire is one of the few places in the UK where major underground gas storage in salt caverns has been delivered, paving the way for potential hydrogen storage, which is already done at scale elsewhere.

When I worked at ICI, I was given a tour of one of salt caverns. One is rumoured to be large enough to enable a full-size replica of Salisbury cathedral to be built inside.

Research

This is said about research.

Esteemed universities, and a wealth of innovative research companies, mean the region can deliver new hydrogen technologies. With academia working side-by-side with industry, the North West’s institutions can equip the next generation of skilled workers to support the hydrogen economy.

As a graduatev of one of those esteemed universities, how can I disagree?

Carbon Capture And Storage

This is said about carbon capture and storage.

Offshore reservoirs in the East Irish Sea can store carbon dioxide (CO2) produced from hydrogen production. Carbon Capture Utilisation and Storage (CCUS) is essential technology to help the UK in its fight against climate change. CCUS can capture up to 95% of the CO2 emissions associated with producing hydrogen from natural gas.

Whether you want to produce hydrogen this way is another matter. But the oil refineries and chemical plants along the Mersey are surely prime candidates for CCUS.

An Alliance

Not for nothing is the project called the North West Hydrogen Alliance!

Sixteen partners are mentioned at the end of the document.

 

May 8, 2020 Posted by | Transport | , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Germany’s 83rd Hydrogen Station Opens

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on H2 View.

This is the introductory paragraph.

H2 Mobility, along with its partners Shell and Air Liquide, has opened Germany’s 83rd hydrogen refuelling station in Dortmund in the North Rhine-Westphalia region.

The Germans now have eighteen hydrogen stations in Dortmund alone, which is more than we have in the whole of the UK.

May 8, 2020 Posted by | Transport | , | Leave a comment