The Anonymous Widower

A Pedestrian Level Crossing And A Lone Coradia iLint At Bremervörde Station

öI’d waited at Buxtehude station for a Coradia iLint to appear in vain, so I moved on to Bremervörde station, where I took these pictures.

It turned out that one train had returned to the factory, so there wasn’t much to see. Coupled with the news I heard earlier about Not Enough Drivers, I suspect that the Germans seem to be suffering in the same way, as we are on the introduction of new trains.

 

October 12, 2018 Posted by | Transport | , , | Leave a comment

Not Enough Drivers

I have just been told that the hydrogen trains will.not be running today between Buxtahude and Cuxhaven as there are not enough drivers.

Where have I heard that before?

October 12, 2018 Posted by | Transport | , | 2 Comments

Will Alstom Use The Buxtehude To Cuxhaven Route As A Test Route For The iLint Train?

I think there are various factors that could make the route between Buxtehude and Cuxhaven stations an ideal test route for hydrogen-powered iLint trains.

Bremervörde Depot

This Google Map shows the area of Bremervörde station.

There appears to be a lot of space.

In this article on Railway Technology, which is entitled iLint: The World’s First Hydrogen-Powered Train, this is said.

As part of the deal, Alstom will provide maintenance for the trains over a 30-year period. Meanwhile, leading gas company Linde will supply hydrogen for the new trains and erect the first-ever hydrogen filling station for trains in Bremervörde. The plan is that hydrogen will be produced onsite via electrolysis and wind energy at a later stage of the project.

As I passed through Bremervörde station, on my trip to the line at the weekend, I took this picture.

There would be plenty of space for the proposed hydrogen plant and to stable both the working fleet and any other trains, that were being tested for other places in Europe.

Linde would would only have to ensure that the hydrogen plant was sized for all future needs.

The Buxtehude To Cuxhaven Route

The route between Buxtehude and Cuxhaven has the following characteristics.

  • It is about a hundred kilometres long.
  • It is  mainly single track except for the section through Bremerhaven, where it has at least two electrified tracks.
  • There are passing places.
  • The scheduled service is one train per hour (tph) in both directions.
  • The line appears to have reasonably new signalling.
  • There are numerous level crossings.
  • I didn’t see any other traffic on the line, but I suspect there must be extra paths for freight, service trains, empty stock movements and a heritage service that uses part of the route.

I suspect that it could make an ideal test route, if extra trains could be squeezed in between the scheduled service.

Distance From the Salzgitter Factory

The Lint trains are built at in a factory at Salzgitter, which is between Hanover and Bruaunwieg, which is about four hours away.

The iLint trains could do this making their own small amounts of steam, but they would probably be dragged by a diesel locomotive.

Testing An Electric iLint

I think that we’ll eventually see a pantograph on the iLint, for one of three reasons.

  • It would allow running on overhead electrification to charge the battery and reduce hydrogen consumption.
  • It would allow creation of a diesel/electric hybrid version, that might be a lower capital cost alternative for shorter lines.
  • It would create a battery.electric hybrid for short extension routes.

Alstom could possibly create a range of solutions for a wide range of applications.

The Buxtehade To Cuxhaven route includes a section of electrified line, which would surely be ideal for the testing of these trains.

Conclusion

I think that Alstom will use the route to test hydrogen-powered trains.

 

 

September 25, 2018 Posted by | Transport | , , , | Leave a comment

A Sighting Of The Two Coradia iLint Hydrogen Trains

I finally got to see the two Coradia iLint trains, parked at Bremervörde station.

On bahn.de they were talking about weather warnings, so perhaps Alstom and the operator were just being prudent. After all they didn’t want another Hindenburg disaster!

Not that there’s much chance of that these days when modern materials are used to build safe methods of hydrogen storage.

September 24, 2018 Posted by | Transport | , , | 4 Comments

Think Again, If You Think We Have Too Many Level Crossings!

These are some pictures of the level crossing on the route between Buxtehude and Cuxhaven stations.

Some seemed to be very busy, but others were just on a concrete farm track.

I think with the exception of in the electrified Bremerhaven section, I didn’t see any bridges over the route.

The other feature visible from the line, was the large number of wind turbines.

September 24, 2018 Posted by | Transport | , , | Leave a comment

A Brief Glimpse Of A Hydrogen-Powered Coradia iLint

On my early morning journey between Hamburg and Bremerhaven stations, with a change at Buxtehude station, I caught the first train of the day.

At Bremervörde station, my train stopped alongside a hydrogen-powered Coradia iLint and this was the best of the pictures I tried to take in the bad light and pouring rain.

I saw passengers sitting on the train, but by the time we left, they all seemed to have taken other means of transport.

September 24, 2018 Posted by | Transport | , | Leave a comment

An Analysis Of The Route Between Buxtehude And Cuxhaven

Alstom have chosen the route between Buxtehude and Cuxhaven, as the launch route for their hydrogen-powered Coradia iLint train.

I’ll now look at the route.

Buxtehude Station

Buxtehude station is on the outskirts of Hamburg.

This Google Map shows the station.

Note.

  1. There is a double-track electrified line through the station.
  2. There appears to be a West-facing bay platform, which conveniently has what looks to be a train in DB red, in the platform.

Services at Buxtehude include.

  1. Line S3 of the Hamburg S-Bahn between Pinneberg  and Stade. This line appears to be electrified with 15 KVAC overhead wires.
  2. Service RE 5 between Cuxhaven and Hamburg via Otterndorf, Stade and Buxtehude. This route is only electrified between Hamburg and Stade.
  3. Service RE 33 between Cuxhaven and Buxtehude via Bremerhaven and Bremervörde. This route is not electrified.

Service three is the one that from yesterday has been run by the Coradia iLint trains.

Between Buxtehude And Bremervörde

I followed this route in my helicopter and it is a single-track line through reasonably open country with in places trees along the line.

If this line was in the UK, it would be something like the Breckland Line or Great Eastern Main Line. through Norfolk, both of which have an operating speed of between 140-160 kph.

So I wouldn’t be surprised that the Coradia iLint could be almost at its maximum speed of 140 kph for long periods between stations.

Bremervörde Station

This Google Map shows Bremervörde station.

It would appear to be on a large site and there might even be a depot.

There’s certainly space to add a couple of large wind turbines to generate electricity, that could be used to create hydrogen through electrolysis.

Between Bremervörde And Bremerhafen HBf

As with the line to the East of Bremervörde, it is fairly straight across what appears to be fairly flat and through a mixture of open countryside and woodland.

This Google Map shows Bremerhafen Wulfdorf station.

The line from Buxtehude can be seen joining from the East.

The line is electrified to Bremerhafen HBf station.

So will the Coradia iLint trains change to overhead power at Bremerhafen Wulfdorf?

From Bremerhafen HBf To Cuxhaven

This Google Map shows Bremerhaven HBf station.

It looks to be a typical functional German station with four platforms, which are all electrified.

The electrification continues Northwards for a few kilometres, but once out of Bremerhaven, the line becomes single track without electrification.

I found this passing loop at the two-platform Dorum station, shown here on a Google Map.

Note how the tracks go either side of an island platform.

I suspect there are other places for trains to pass or they could easily be created.

The route ends at Cuxhaven station, shown in this Google Map.

In addition to the service to Buxtehude, there is also a another service on a shorter and more direct route to Hamburg along the estuary of the River Elbe.

Summing up this section of the route.

  • It is single-track with at least one passing loop.
  • There are just four stations.
  • It is electrified for a few miles at the Southern end.

I’ve also never seen a line with so many level crossings.

Services Between Cuxhaven And Buxtehude Via Bremerhaven HBf

The current service is hourly, with what looks to be these timings.

  • Buxtehude to Bremerhaven HBf  – 1:43 – Incldes 14 stops
  • Bremerhaven HBf to Buxtehude – 1:37
  • Bremerhaven HBf to Cuxhaven  0:51 – Includes 4 stops
  • Cuxhaven to Bremerhaven HBf – 0:44
  • Buxtehude to Cuxhaven – 2:34
  • Cuxhaven to Buxtehude – 2:21

Turnrounds are the following times.

Buxtehute – 28 minutes

Cuxhaven – 12 minutes

This gives a round trip of five hours and thirty-five minutes.

So it would appear that at least five Coradia Lint 41 trains are needed to provide the service.

Coradia Lint Trains

From what I can find on the Internet, the Coradia Lint trains are diesel-mechanical units, where the wheels are driven directly from the two diesel engines.

I’m not sure, but the engines may be mounted under the cabs!

Coradia iLint Trains

I suspect that the hydrogen-powered iLint trains could be driven by simply replacing the diesel engine, with a suitable traction motor.

What surprises me, is that there appears to be no plans to fit a pantograph  to the iLint, so that the intelligent brain on the train can use overhead electrification, when it exists.

This would mean that the range of the train on hydrogen would be increased, if the route was partially electrified.

Coradia iLint Trains Between Buxtehude to Cuxhaven

On the Buxtehude to Cuxhaven route, using electrification could be used to advantage to power the train and charge the batteries  through Bremerhaven, where about ten kilometres is electrified using 15 KVAC overhead wires.

Also, in Buxtehude station, which has 15 KVAC electrification on other lines, the bay platform that it appears will be used for the hydrogen-powered trains could be electrified to charge the batteries, during the  twenty-eight minutes, that the train is in the station. Perhaps, they could use a system such as I wrote about in Is This The Solution To A Charging Station For Battery Trains?

A similar system could be installed at Cuxhaven.

Surely, it is better to use the turnround times at each end of the route to charge the batteries, as this means less hydrogen will be consumed and the train’s range on a tankful will be increased!

There is an interesting comparison to be made here, with a route, I know well in the UK; Cambridge to Norwich.

  • Both routes are around 100 km.
  • Both routes are fairly flat and reasonably straight.
  • The operating speed of the UK line is 140 kph and I suspect the German line is about the same.
  • The UK line has six intermediate stops, whereas the German route has fourteen stops.
  • Both lines are run by diesel trains with similar operating speeds.

But the UK route is timed at one hour and nineteen minutes, as opposed to the two hours thirty-four minutes of the German one.

The German route does have twelve more stops, but even if two minutes is allowed for each stop, that doesn’t explain the difference.

The German route must be run at a slower speed than the UK one.

As the Germans improve the speed, journey times will surely reduce.

Conclusion

I am led to the conclusion, that Buxtehude to Cuxhaven route is an ideal route on which to test hydrogen-powered trains, but that as the trains develop, journey times will reduce substantially.

 

 

September 18, 2018 Posted by | Transport | , , , , , | 8 Comments