The Anonymous Widower

The Lincolnshire Wind Powerhouse

In August 2022, reports started to appear about the Outer Dowsing Wind Farm, like this article on offshoreWIND.biz, which is entitled Corio, Total Submit Scoping Report For 1.5 GW Outer Dowsing Offshore Wind Project.

There is now a web site.

  • Outer Dowsing Offshore Wind  is a 1.5GW project located approximately 54km off the Lincolnshire coast.
  • It is a joint project between TotalEnergies and Corio Generation.

This map from the Outer Dowsing Wind Farm web site, shows the location of the wind farm.

These are the sizes of the various windfarms, that are shown on the map.

  • Dudgeon – 402 MW
  • Hornsea 1 – 1218 MW
  • Hornsea 2 – 1386 MW
  • Hornsea 3 – 2852 MW
  • Hornsea 4 – 1000 MW – Not shown on map.
  • Humber Gateway – 219 MW
  • Lincs – 270 MW
  • Lynn and Inner Dowsing – 194 MW
  • Norfolk Vanguard West – No information, but Norfolk Vanguard is 1800 MW
  • Outer Dowsing – 1500 MW
  • Race Bank – 580 MW
  • Sheringham Shoal – 317 MW
  • Sheringham Shoal and Dudgeon Extensions – 719 MW
  • Triton Knoll – 857 MW
  • Westernmost Rough – 210 MW

Note that these total up to 11724 MW, but with Norfolk Vanguard the total is 135224 MW.

Gas-Fired Power Stations

There are also several active gas-fired power stations.

  • Immingham – 1240 MW
  • Keadby – 734 MW
  • Keadby 2 – 893 MW
  • Keadby 3 – 910 MW – Planned to be fitted with carbon capture.
  • Saltend – 1200 MW
  • South Humber Bank – 1365 MW
  • Spalding – 860 MW
  • Sutton Bridge – 819 MW

Note that these total up to 8021 MW.

Viking Link

The Viking Link is a 1.4 GW interconnector, that links Bicker Fen in Lincolnshire and Denmark, that should be operational at the end of 2023.

Gas Storage

There are two major gas storage facilities in the rea.

Both will eventually be converted to store hydrogen, which could be used by local industrial users or the proposed hydrogen power station at Keadby.

November 21, 2022 Posted by | Energy, Hydrogen | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Caledonia Wind Farm

Another of the ScotWind wind farms, that I described in ScotWind Offshore Wind Leasing Delivers Major Boost To Scotland’s Net Zero Aspirations, has been given a name and a web site.

This map shows the various ScotWind leases.

Note, that the numbers are Scotwind’s lease number in their documents.

9 is now Caledonia.

  • It has grown from a 1,000 MW fixed foundation wind farm and is now 2,000 MW.
  • A completion date of 2030 is now given.

The wind farm will be the fourth development in the area, after the 598 MW Beatrice, the 950 MW Moray East and the 882 MW Moray West wind farms. That is a total of nearly 4,500 MW.

Caledonia’s Unique Advantages

On the About Caledonia page on the Caledonia Wind Farm web site, there is a section called Caledonia’s Unique Advantages, which has four sections.

Water Depths

Caledonia’s water depths are 40 to 100 m. Three-quarters of the site is at depths that allow for fixed (rather than floating) foundations.

This means the majority of the site can be built using the same type of jacket foundations which Ocean Winds optimised at Moray East, seeing Caledonia implement a proven, low-risk, low-cost engineering solution.

Wind

The wind resource at Caledonia is proven through the experience of previous projects and is of a magnitude more usually associated with deeper waters, further from shore. This means Caledonia will benefit from an excellent wind resource, yielding a higher output at lower costs.

Distance from Shore

Caledonia is around 40km from shore and 70km from the nearest National Grid connection point. Beyond distances of approx 120km, DC technology becomes a necessity for subsea transmission. This means the additional costs associated with installing AC-DC convertors offshore and DC-AC convertors onshore can be avoided and the onshore substation will be smaller so will require less land and have a lesser impact on the surrounding environment.

Environment

The Moray Firth is the home of commercial-scale offshore wind generation in Scotland. Caledonia neighbours the Moray East, Moray West, and Beatrice sites, and Ocean Winds have had a presence here from the beginning of the area’s offshore wind development.

Conclusion

It does appear that if you do your planning well on projects like these, there are benefits to be reaped in terms of size, construction, capacity and financial returns.

November 21, 2022 Posted by | Energy | , , , , , | 1 Comment

MingYang Turbines to Spin on Hexicon’s Floating Offshore Wind Project

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on offshoreWIND.biz.

This is the sub-heading, which outlines MingYang’s part in the project.

Hexicon has selected China-headquartered Mingyang Smart Energy (Mingyang) as the preferred turbine supplier for its flagship 32 MW TwinHub floating offshore wind project in the UK.

These two paragraphs add more detail.

Hexicon has also awarded Mingyang the wind turbine generator Front-End Engineering Design (FEED) contract for the project, which is located 16 kilometres off the coast of Cornwall, England.

TwinHub will use Hexicon’s TwinWind floating foundation technology which will allow two of Mingyang’s MySE 8.0-180 wind turbines to be placed on a single foundation, which could enable more energy to be generated in a given area while reducing the environmental impact compared with a single foundation.

It’s rather a pity, that Swedish company; Hexicon should be using Chinese turbines and design contracts.

  • I’m sure that one of the European manufacturers could have supplied 8 MW turbines.
  • Some might even have parts made in the UK.

Perhaps, Hexicon see China as a major market for their TwinHub floating foundation technology.

On the other hand, I have experience of doing the floatation mathematics for large structures from my work with Balaena Structures in the 1970s and feel they are not as straightforward as some might think. But Hexicon may feel their design doesn’t hold any secrets!

November 21, 2022 Posted by | Energy | , , , , , , , | 3 Comments