The Anonymous Widower

Google Buys Scottish Offshore Wind Power

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on offshoreWIND.biz.

This is the sub-heading and the first paragraph.

ENGIE and Google have entered into a 12-year, 100 MW corporate power purchase agreement (CPPA) supporting the Moray West offshore wind development in Scotland.

ENGIE will provide Google with more than 5 TWh of green power from the Moray West project, a nearly 900 MW offshore wind farm set to begin generating power from 2025.

Increasingly, it seems that large energy users are committing themselves to long-term energy deals.

One of Google’s senior people is quoted as saying.

People across the UK and Europe are increasingly worried about climate change and energy security. We share that concern and believe technology is an important part of the solution – both by reducing our own emissions, and by helping others to reduce their own.

I have a few thoughts.

How Much Of Moray West’s Output Is 5 TWh?

Consider.

  • Moray West has an maximum output of 882 MW.
  • This converts to 7.73 TWh.

If Google are buying all the electricity produced by the wind farm, that would mean that the capacity factor is around 64.7 %, which is quite reasonable, if a bit high for a fixed foundation wind farm.

If we are, it does surely reflect a desire for stability and security in a fast-changing world.

Are We Seeing More Corporate Power Purchase Agreements (CPPAs)?

November 24, 2022 Posted by | Computing, Energy | , , , | 1 Comment

The Caledonia Wind Farm

Another of the ScotWind wind farms, that I described in ScotWind Offshore Wind Leasing Delivers Major Boost To Scotland’s Net Zero Aspirations, has been given a name and a web site.

This map shows the various ScotWind leases.

Note, that the numbers are Scotwind’s lease number in their documents.

9 is now Caledonia.

  • It has grown from a 1,000 MW fixed foundation wind farm and is now 2,000 MW.
  • A completion date of 2030 is now given.

The wind farm will be the fourth development in the area, after the 598 MW Beatrice, the 950 MW Moray East and the 882 MW Moray West wind farms. That is a total of nearly 4,500 MW.

Caledonia’s Unique Advantages

On the About Caledonia page on the Caledonia Wind Farm web site, there is a section called Caledonia’s Unique Advantages, which has four sections.

Water Depths

Caledonia’s water depths are 40 to 100 m. Three-quarters of the site is at depths that allow for fixed (rather than floating) foundations.

This means the majority of the site can be built using the same type of jacket foundations which Ocean Winds optimised at Moray East, seeing Caledonia implement a proven, low-risk, low-cost engineering solution.

Wind

The wind resource at Caledonia is proven through the experience of previous projects and is of a magnitude more usually associated with deeper waters, further from shore. This means Caledonia will benefit from an excellent wind resource, yielding a higher output at lower costs.

Distance from Shore

Caledonia is around 40km from shore and 70km from the nearest National Grid connection point. Beyond distances of approx 120km, DC technology becomes a necessity for subsea transmission. This means the additional costs associated with installing AC-DC convertors offshore and DC-AC convertors onshore can be avoided and the onshore substation will be smaller so will require less land and have a lesser impact on the surrounding environment.

Environment

The Moray Firth is the home of commercial-scale offshore wind generation in Scotland. Caledonia neighbours the Moray East, Moray West, and Beatrice sites, and Ocean Winds have had a presence here from the beginning of the area’s offshore wind development.

Conclusion

It does appear that if you do your planning well on projects like these, there are benefits to be reaped in terms of size, construction, capacity and financial returns.

November 21, 2022 Posted by | Energy | , , , , , | 1 Comment