The Anonymous Widower

Scotland’s Largest Offshore Wind Farm Entering Home Stretch

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on offshoreWIND.biz.

This the the sub heading.

75 per cent of the jacket foundations have been installed at the Seagreen offshore wind farm, according to the latest social media update by one of the project’s developers, SSE Renewables.

These are other points from the article.

  • So far, there are 89 jacket foundations and 74 wind turbines installed at the project’s construction site.
  • The three-legged jacket foundations, each weighing around 2,000 tonnes, are being placed in depths up to 58 metres off the Angus coast.
  • Besides being the largest Scottish wind farm, Seagreen is also the world’s deepest project of this kind using bottom-fixed foundations.
  • TotalEnergies is the other partner in the development.
  • The project’s total installed capacity will be 1,575 MW.

The development of Seagreen wind farm,  seems to have been relatively pain-free.

December 5, 2022 Posted by | Energy | , , , , | 2 Comments

The Lincolnshire Wind Powerhouse

In August 2022, reports started to appear about the Outer Dowsing Wind Farm, like this article on offshoreWIND.biz, which is entitled Corio, Total Submit Scoping Report For 1.5 GW Outer Dowsing Offshore Wind Project.

There is now a web site.

  • Outer Dowsing Offshore Wind  is a 1.5GW project located approximately 54km off the Lincolnshire coast.
  • It is a joint project between TotalEnergies and Corio Generation.

This map from the Outer Dowsing Wind Farm web site, shows the location of the wind farm.

These are the sizes of the various windfarms, that are shown on the map.

  • Dudgeon – 402 MW
  • Hornsea 1 – 1218 MW
  • Hornsea 2 – 1386 MW
  • Hornsea 3 – 2852 MW
  • Hornsea 4 – 1000 MW – Not shown on map.
  • Humber Gateway – 219 MW
  • Lincs – 270 MW
  • Lynn and Inner Dowsing – 194 MW
  • Norfolk Vanguard West – No information, but Norfolk Vanguard is 1800 MW
  • Outer Dowsing – 1500 MW
  • Race Bank – 580 MW
  • Sheringham Shoal – 317 MW
  • Sheringham Shoal and Dudgeon Extensions – 719 MW
  • Triton Knoll – 857 MW
  • Westernmost Rough – 210 MW

Note that these total up to 11724 MW, but with Norfolk Vanguard the total is 135224 MW.

Gas-Fired Power Stations

There are also several active gas-fired power stations.

  • Immingham – 1240 MW
  • Keadby – 734 MW
  • Keadby 2 – 893 MW
  • Keadby 3 – 910 MW – Planned to be fitted with carbon capture.
  • Saltend – 1200 MW
  • South Humber Bank – 1365 MW
  • Spalding – 860 MW
  • Sutton Bridge – 819 MW

Note that these total up to 8021 MW.

Viking Link

The Viking Link is a 1.4 GW interconnector, that links Bicker Fen in Lincolnshire and Denmark, that should be operational at the end of 2023.

Gas Storage

There are two major gas storage facilities in the rea.

Both will eventually be converted to store hydrogen, which could be used by local industrial users or the proposed hydrogen power station at Keadby.

November 21, 2022 Posted by | Energy, Hydrogen | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

First Power At Scotland’s Largest Offshore Wind Farm

The title of this post, is the same as that of this press release from Seagreen wind farm.

These two paragraphs summarize the project and its start-up.

TotalEnergies and its partner SSE Renewables, has announced first power generation from the Seagreen offshore wind farm, 27km off the coast of Angus in Scotland.

The first turbine of a total of 114, was commissioned in the early hours of Monday morning. The aim is for the 1075 MW farm to be fully operational in the first half of 2023. The £3bn Seagreen project will be Scotland’s largest offshore wind farm and the world’s deepest fixed bottom wind farm as it is being developed in up to water depths of 59 meters.

It looks like 1075 MW cost £3billion, so I suspect it’s reasonable to say that offshore fixed-foundation wind farms cost about £2.79billion per GW.

The press release also says this about yearly output.

When fully operational, the site will produce around 5 terawatt hours (TWh) of renewable electricity per year, enough to power the equivalent of 1.6 million households.

That looks like an expected capacity factor of 53.1 %.

August 23, 2022 Posted by | Energy | , , , | Leave a comment