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February 3, 2023 Posted by | Design, Energy | , , , , , | Enter your password to view comments.

Another Renewable Power Idea From Sweden

I have posted some ideas from Sweden on this blog including.

And now there’s the SEATWIRL,  which the company says is the future of offshore wind.

In the Areas Of Use, there is a section with a heading of SeaTwirl For Niche Markets, where this is said.

SeaTwirl has now identified markets where wind turbines of the size of 1 MW can meet a clear market demand and sees a possibility to build a business aimed at these niche markets in parallel with its main target. That can mean revenues for the company sooner than was originally planned.

The niche markets that have been identified are islands and remote seaside villages, fish farms and desalination plants. These are business and places that today are run mainly on electricity from diesel generators, which is both expensive and emits CO2.

One of the places I would use these turbines, is on the apex of four-beam steel portal frame buildings. The original concept for these buildings had been developed at Cambridge University during World War Two and one of the team, had set up a business in Warwickshire, constructing these buildings for barns, factory units and other purposes.

He had programmed a simple computer program, which he ran on a time-shared computer system. I was hired to improve the computer program.

What surprised me was the strength of these buildings and I believe they could support vertical turbines like SeaTwirl along the apex.

I feel there are many other applications, especially if they are designed to be part pf a bigger system.

Conclusion

I like the concept of SeaTwirl.

January 8, 2023 Posted by | Energy | , , | 1 Comment

MingYang Turbines to Spin on Hexicon’s Floating Offshore Wind Project

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on offshoreWIND.biz.

November 21, 2022 Posted by | Energy | , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Is This The World’s Best Renewable Energy Video?

This is a promotional video from Minesto about their Deep Green technology.

Is it a serious proposition or is it just kite-flying?

After reading their web site in detail, I think they are serious.

Here’s why!

The Company Is A Well-Backed Spin-Out from Swedish Aerospace Company SAAB

These two paragraphs are from the About Us page.

Minesto is a marine energy technology developer, founded in 2007 as a spin-off from Swedish aerospace manufacturer Saab. Since then, Minesto has successfully developed its unique Deep Green technology.

The company has operations in Sweden, Wales, Northern Ireland and Taiwan, with headquarters in Gothenburg, Sweden. Main owners are BGA Invest and Midroc New Technology. The Minesto share is listed on the Nasdaq First North Growth Market in Stockholm.

A company rarely succeeds without appropriate and sufficient financial backing.

One Of Their Target Markets Is Powering Remote Islands

This page from World Atlas is entitled Which Countries Have The Most Islands?

These are the top five countries.

  • Sweden – 267,570
  • Norway – 239,057
  • Finland – 178,947
  • Canada – 52,455
  • United States – 18,617

Note.

  1. That’s a lot of islands.
  2. The United Kingdom is 26th with a thousand islands.
  3. Scandinavia has 685574 islands or 686993 if you include Denmark.

Sweden has a thousand inhabited islands, so that means that in Scandinavia alone, there are about 2,500 inhabited islands. How many need a reliable decarbonised power supply?

In the UK, we are developing Remote Island Wind to serve similar locations, which I wrote about in The Concept Of Remote Island Wind.

The UK and Minesto are both looking at the supply of power to remote islands.

One of Minesto’s projects is in the Faroe Islands and it is described in this page on the Minesto web site, which has a title of Faroe Islands – Tidal Energy To Reach 100% Renewable By 2030.

These are the first two paragraphs.

In the Faroe Islands, Minesto is part of one of the world’s most ambitious energy transition schemes.

Collaborating with the electric utility company SEV, Minesto is working to pave the way for tidal energy to become a core part of the Faroese energy mix, allowing them to reach 100% renewable energy by 2030.

Onshore wind and tidal could be an ideal combination, if they worked together.

At the bottom of the Faroe Islands page, the web site talks about The Deep Green Island Mode Project, where this is said.

In June 2019, Minesto was awarded a €2.5 million grant from the European Commission’s SME Instrument programme. The awarded funding will support the installation of Minesto’s technology in the Faroe Islands together with the utility company SEV. The aim of the project, called Deep Green Island Mode (DGIM), is to install Minesto’s first two commercially viable microgrid units in a production and customer environment.

Successful demonstration of DGIM will act as a first step to developing commercial ties with utilities across Europe, both for smaller-scale microgrid systems and as a catalyst for the market up take of larger utility-scale Deep Green systems.

This is also said about the number of installations in Europe.

15 million Europeans live on Europe’s 2,400 inhabited islands, at an average of approximately 1,500 households per island. As recognised by the European Commission, island energy is expensive, polluting, inefficient and dependent on external supply, with significant negative impacts on emissions, the competitiveness of businesses, and the economy.

It appears to me, that Minesto have researched their market well.

Minesto Can Provide Baseload Power

Another of Minesto’s projects is in Taiwan and it is described in this page on the Minesto web site, which has a title of Taiwan – Replacing Nuclear With Renewable Baseload.

These are the first two paragraphs.

In Taiwan, Minesto is carrying out site development with the purpose to establish the first tidal energy arrays with Minesto’s technology in Asia – and to demonstrate renewable baseload generation from the continuously-flowing Kuroshio current.

The conditions for extracting marine energy in Taiwan are very good due to access to both tidal streams and continuous ocean currents. Taiwan aims to produces 20% of electricity from renewable sources by 2025 and has decided to scrap its nuclear power capacity within the same timeframe. Today, 97.5 percent of the country’s total energy use comes from imported fossil fuels.

Taiwan has a well-developed industrial infrastructure and a number of stakeholders in the private and public sectors are active in marine energy.

Decarbonising Taiwan and removing nuclear is a tough ask!

Conclusion

Minesto may be kite-flying in an unusual way, but they appear to be a very serious Swedish company.

 

October 3, 2022 Posted by | Energy | , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

North Seas Countries Commit To 260 GW Of Offshore Wind By 2050

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Renewables Now.

This is the first two paragraphs.

The nine member countries of the North Seas Energy Cooperation (NSEC) on Monday committed to at least 260 GW of offshore wind energy by 2050.

The NSEC aims to advance offshore renewables in the North Seas, including the Irish and Celtic Seas, and groups Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Ireland, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden and the European Commission.

Note.

Intermediate targets are 76 GW by 2030 and 193 GW by 2040.

The UK has a target of 50 GW by 2030, of which 5 GW will be floating offshore wind.

The UK is not mentioned, but has joint projects with the Danes, Germans, Irish, Norwegians, Spanish and Swedes.

There is nothing about energy storage or hydrogen!

On the figures given, I think we’re holding our own. But then we’ve got more sea than anybody else.

September 13, 2022 Posted by | Energy | , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Hexicon Wins UK’s First Ever CfD Auction For Floating Offshore Wind

The title of this post, is the same as that of this press release from Hexicon.

This is the first paragraph.

Today (7th of July) the UK Government confirmed that Hexicon AB’s TwinHub project in the Celtic Sea was successful in the latest Contracts for Difference (CfD) Allocation Round (AR4). It has been awarded a CfD for its 32MW floating wind project at a strike price of £87.30/MWh (2012 real prices) taking the project a significant step closer to completion.

This image shows one of their TwinHub turbine installations being towed into place.

The TwinHub home page has a title of The First Floating Offshore Wind Project in The Celtic Sea.

This is the description on the page.

The TwinHub offshore wind demonstration project intends to prove how Hexicon’s innovative design with two turbines on one floating foundation can further reduce the Levelized Cost of Energy (also referred to as LCoE) before large scale commercialisation. The TwinHub project is a stepping stone to help kick-start floating wind in the Celtic Sea, an area identified as a hotspot for floating wind by the UK Government. It will pave the path for larger and larger projects to help support The Crown Estates’ ambitious target of 4GW of floating wind in the Celtic Sea.

Scroll the page down and there is a short video of a pair of wind turbines in operation.

  • It appears that when there is no wind, it automatically goes into a safe parked mode.
  • As the wind rises, one turbine starts up.
  • The second turbine starts up and the float turns so they face the wind.

It appears to be a classic example of disruptive innovation.

I did the calculations for floating and reusable oil and gas platforms in the 1970s, that were designed by two Cambridge University professors, which would have been launched horizontally and upturned when in position. This experience leads me to believe that the Swedish designers of this type of platform have been able to verify that this is a workable design.

This document from the Department of Business, Industry and Industrial Strategy indicates that the demonstration is for 32 MW.

Does that indicate, that this installation is twin 16 MW wind turbines?

16 MW seems to be the size of the largest wind turbines in the world.

There is a lot to like about this Swedish design.

  • As the video shows, it appears to balance itself with the wind.
  • I suspect from the calculations I did in Cambridge, that the twin design with its higher weight is more stable than a floating single turbine design.
  • The float and its two turbines can be assembled alongside a dock with a large stable onshore dockside crane.
  • Servicing would also be done in a dock.
  • Working onshore is much safer and easier, than working offshore.
  • The twin design allows more power to be generated in a given area of sea.

This is a brilliant concept and it will give Putin, the Sheikhs and the other oil dictators, the most terrible of nightmares.

The initial site chosen for this design in the UK, will be in the sea at Hayle in Cornwall.

This map shows the location.

Hayle is in the North-East corner of the map, by the sandy beach.

A 32 MW turbine could probably provide enough electricity for 15,000 houses.

July 8, 2022 Posted by | Energy | , , , , , | 9 Comments

How A British-Made Missile Launcher Helped Keep Vladimir Putin’s Army At Bay

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on The Telegraph.

This is the sub-title.

The Anglo-Swedish next-generation light anti-tank weapon (NLAW) has achieved cult status in Ukraine.

But not perhaps in Russia! Unless they worship the devil!

Seriously, though, we may be watching the war, which marks the beginning of the end of the tank.

  • A general of my acquaintance told me about ten years ago, that tanks were a nightmare for army commanders, unless the terrain was very tank-friendly. He should have known, as he’d once run the Army Survey, which gives geographical information to the British Army.
  • Defenders like the jolly Ukrainian in the video in the Telegraph article, will get better missiles and do more damage to tanks.
  • Satellites and drones will get more watchful and intelligent and will direct the firepower of defenders to the inch.
  • Tanks could get bigger, but then they would be more likely to get stuck.

My only worry, is will the death of the tank, make chemical, biological or nuclear war more likely?

April 1, 2022 Posted by | World | , , , , , , , | 8 Comments

Is This Weapon Helping The Ukranians?

In The Times today, there is an article, which gives a list of what weapons have been supplied to the Ukrainians.

Included are.

But there is no mention of the MBT LAW. This is the introduction to the Wikipedia entry for the weapon.

The Main Battle Tank and Light Anti-tank Weapon (MBT LAW), also known as the NLAW, is a joint British and Swedish short-range fire-and-forget anti-tank missile system. Designed for use by infantry, the MBT LAW is shoulder fired and disposable, firing once before being disposed of. It is currently in use with the military forces of the United Kingdom, Finland, Luxembourg, Ukraine, and Sweden, among others.

There is a lot of interesting information in the Wikipedia entry.

  • It is fired once and the launcher is thrown away.
  • It has a soft-launch, which allows it to be fired from an enclosed space.
  • It is designed to be fired at moving targets.

I also think, that it could be a weapon, where a dummy version could be built that would be a superb training simulator.

  • The trainee would sit on the range with his dummy weapon and go through the process of identifying a target and pulling the trigger.
  • The dummy could even simulate the forces of launching a real missile.
  • The simulator would calculate the trajectory of the missile and tell the trainee and his instructor, if they had hit the target.

The missile would not be fired and there would be no damage to the target.

This is said about deliveries to Ukraine.

At least 2,000 NLAW units are known to be supplied to Ukraine by the United Kingdom by 19 January 2022 and more shipments, including by other supporters, can be assumed amid the Russian invasion of Ukraine.

The Times says this about the training of Ukrainian forces and British Army tactics.

Since 2015 about 22,000 Ukrainian troops have been trained by the British Army as part of Operation Orbital.

Price said anti-armour ambushes of the sort deployed by Ukrainian forces were pretty much the bread and butter of the British infantry, adding: “If you have a classic column of 10 to 20 tanks and you’ve got a wide field of fire then you can knock two or three of them out and then the rest are sitting ducks and they can’t reverse out. Then you finish them off,” he said.

Note that Price is Kevin Price a former British Army major.

It sounds like a few well-trained soldiers sitting in a protected bunker armed with this missile could play havoc with a tank formation.

 

 

 

February 28, 2022 Posted by | World | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Infection, Mortality And Severity Of Covid-19 In Coeliac Disease – Prof Jonas Ludvigsson

The title of this post is the same as that of this presentation on the Coeliac UK web site.

If you are coeliac and worried about catching the Covids, I suggest you watch the presentation.

The presentation is about eighteen minutes long and this is the last-but-one screen.

Coeliac Disease and Covid-19

  • No increased risk of death from Covid-19
  • No increased risk of ICU for Covid-19
  • No increased risk of any (!) Covid-19

THEN: Coeliac patients with Covid-19, have no increased risk of death compared to other patients with Covid-19.

Conclusion

The professor concludes it is good news and there is no need for coeliac patients to get the jab earlier than other people.

I would also like to add my fourpennyworth!

The professor was only analysing diagnosed coeliacs, who were probably on a long-term gluten-free diet.

My son was an undiagnosed coeliac, who lived the rock and roll lifestyle, generally living on ciggies, high-strength cannabis and Subways. His immune system, probably gave him all the protection of a plastic colander.

He died at just 37 from pancreatic cancer.

 

December 25, 2021 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Alstom’s Coradia iLint Hydrogen Train Makes Its Swedish Debut

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Global Railway Review.

This picture shows a hydrogen-powered Alstom Coradia iLint train near Hamburg

If you’re ever in Hamburg, take a ride to Buxtehude and take a ride to Cuxhaven.

These trains are now in service in Germany and have been ordered in quantity in Germany and have been demonstrated in Austria, Italy and The Netherlands.

August 26, 2021 Posted by | Hydrogen, Transport/Travel | , , , , , , | Leave a comment