The Anonymous Widower

North Seas Countries Commit To 260 GW Of Offshore Wind By 2050

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Renewables Now.

This is the first two paragraphs.

The nine member countries of the North Seas Energy Cooperation (NSEC) on Monday committed to at least 260 GW of offshore wind energy by 2050.

The NSEC aims to advance offshore renewables in the North Seas, including the Irish and Celtic Seas, and groups Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Ireland, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden and the European Commission.

Note.

Intermediate targets are 76 GW by 2030 and 193 GW by 2040.

The UK has a target of 50 GW by 2030, of which 5 GW will be floating offshore wind.

The UK is not mentioned, but has joint projects with the Danes, Germans, Irish, Norwegians, Spanish and Swedes.

There is nothing about energy storage or hydrogen!

On the figures given, I think we’re holding our own. But then we’ve got more sea than anybody else.

September 13, 2022 Posted by | Energy | , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Hexicon Wins UK’s First Ever CfD Auction For Floating Offshore Wind

The title of this post, is the same as that of this press release from Hexicon.

This is the first paragraph.

Today (7th of July) the UK Government confirmed that Hexicon AB’s TwinHub project in the Celtic Sea was successful in the latest Contracts for Difference (CfD) Allocation Round (AR4). It has been awarded a CfD for its 32MW floating wind project at a strike price of £87.30/MWh (2012 real prices) taking the project a significant step closer to completion.

This image shows one otheir TwinWind turbine installation being towed into place.

The Twinhub home page has a title of The First Floating Offshore Wind Project in The Celtic Sea.

This is the description on the page.

The TwinHub offshore wind demonstration project intends to prove how Hexicon’s innovative design with two turbines on one floating foundation can further reduce the Levelized Cost of Energy (also referred to as LCoE) before large scale commercialisation. The TwinHub project is a stepping stone to help kick-start floating wind in the Celtic Sea, an area identified as a hotspot for floating wind by the UK Government. It will pave the path for larger and larger projects to help support The Crown Estates’ ambitious target of 4GW of floating wind in the Celtic Sea.

Scroll the page down and there is a short video of a pair of wind turbines in operation.

  • It appears that when there is no wind, it automatically goes into a safe parked mode.
  • As the wind rises, one turbine starts up.
  • The second turbine starts up and the float turns so they face the wind.

It appears to be a classic example of disruptive innovation.

I did the calculations for floating and reusable oil and gas platforms in the 1970s, that were designed by two Cambridge University professors, which would have been launched horizontally and upturned when in position. This experience leads me to believe that the Swedish designers of this type of platform have been able to verify that this is a workable design.

This document from the Department of Business, Industry and Industrial Strategy indicates that the demonstration is for 32 MW.

Does that indicate, that this installation is twin 16 MW wind turbines?

16 MW seems to be the size of the largest wind turbines in the world.

There is a lot to like about this Swedish design.

  • As the video shows, it appears to balance itself with the wind.
  • I suspect from the calculations I did in Cambridge, that the twin design with its higher weight is more stable than a floating single turbine design.
  • The float and its two turbines can be assembled alongside a dock with a large stable onshore dockside crane.
  • Servicing would also be done in a dock.
  • Working onshore is much safer and easier, than working offshore.
  • The twin design allows more power to be generated in a given area of sea.

This is a brilliant concept and it will give Putin, the Sheikhs and the other oil dictators, the most terrible of nightmares.

The initial site chosen for this design in the UK, will be in the sea at Hayle in Cornwall.

This map shows the location.

Hayle is in the North-East corner of the map, by the sandy beach.

A 32 MW turbine could probably provide enough electricity for 15,000 houses.

July 8, 2022 Posted by | Energy | , , , , , | 5 Comments

How A British-Made Missile Launcher Helped Keep Vladimir Putin’s Army At Bay

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on The Telegraph.

This is the sub-title.

The Anglo-Swedish next-generation light anti-tank weapon (NLAW) has achieved cult status in Ukraine.

But not perhaps in Russia! Unless they worship the devil!

Seriously, though, we may be watching the war, which marks the beginning of the end of the tank.

  • A general of my acquaintance told me about ten years ago, that tanks were a nightmare for army commanders, unless the terrain was very tank-friendly. He should have known, as he’d once run the Army Survey, which gives geographical information to the British Army.
  • Defenders like the jolly Ukrainian in the video in the Telegraph article, will get better missiles and do more damage to tanks.
  • Satellites and drones will get more watchful and intelligent and will direct the firepower of defenders to the inch.
  • Tanks could get bigger, but then they would be more likely to get stuck.

My only worry, is will the death of the tank, make chemical, biological or nuclear war more likely?

April 1, 2022 Posted by | World | , , , , , , , | 8 Comments

Is This Weapon Helping The Ukranians?

In The Times today, there is an article, which gives a list of what weapons have been supplied to the Ukrainians.

Included are.

But there is no mention of the MBT LAW. This is the introduction to the Wikipedia entry for the weapon.

The Main Battle Tank and Light Anti-tank Weapon (MBT LAW), also known as the NLAW, is a joint British and Swedish short-range fire-and-forget anti-tank missile system. Designed for use by infantry, the MBT LAW is shoulder fired and disposable, firing once before being disposed of. It is currently in use with the military forces of the United Kingdom, Finland, Luxembourg, Ukraine, and Sweden, among others.

There is a lot of interesting information in the Wikipedia entry.

  • It is fired once and the launcher is thrown away.
  • It has a soft-launch, which allows it to be fired from an enclosed space.
  • It is designed to be fired at moving targets.

I also think, that it could be a weapon, where a dummy version could be built that would be a superb training simulator.

  • The trainee would sit on the range with his dummy weapon and go through the process of identifying a target and pulling the trigger.
  • The dummy could even simulate the forces of launching a real missile.
  • The simulator would calculate the trajectory of the missile and tell the trainee and his instructor, if they had hit the target.

The missile would not be fired and there would be no damage to the target.

This is said about deliveries to Ukraine.

At least 2,000 NLAW units are known to be supplied to Ukraine by the United Kingdom by 19 January 2022 and more shipments, including by other supporters, can be assumed amid the Russian invasion of Ukraine.

The Times says this about the training of Ukrainian forces and British Army tactics.

Since 2015 about 22,000 Ukrainian troops have been trained by the British Army as part of Operation Orbital.

Price said anti-armour ambushes of the sort deployed by Ukrainian forces were pretty much the bread and butter of the British infantry, adding: “If you have a classic column of 10 to 20 tanks and you’ve got a wide field of fire then you can knock two or three of them out and then the rest are sitting ducks and they can’t reverse out. Then you finish them off,” he said.

Note that Price is Kevin Price a former British Army major.

It sounds like a few well-trained soldiers sitting in a protected bunker armed with this missile could play havoc with a tank formation.

 

 

 

February 28, 2022 Posted by | World | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Infection, Mortality And Severity Of Covid-19 In Coeliac Disease – Prof Jonas Ludvigsson

The title of this post is the same as that of this presentation on the Coeliac UK web site.

If you are coeliac and worried about catching the Covids, I suggest you watch the presentation.

The presentation is about eighteen minutes long and this is the last-but-one screen.

Coeliac Disease and Covid-19

  • No increased risk of death from Covid-19
  • No increased risk of ICU for Covid-19
  • No increased risk of any (!) Covid-19

THEN: Coeliac patients with Covid-19, have no increased risk of death compared to other patients with Covid-19.

Conclusion

The professor concludes it is good news and there is no need for coeliac patients to get the jab earlier than other people.

I would also like to add my fourpennyworth!

The professor was only analysing diagnosed coeliacs, who were probably on a long-term gluten-free diet.

My son was an undiagnosed coeliac, who lived the rock and roll lifestyle, generally living on ciggies, high-strength cannabis and Subways. His immune system, probably gave him all the protection of a plastic colander.

He died at just 37 from pancreatic cancer.

 

December 25, 2021 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Alstom’s Coradia iLint Hydrogen Train Makes Its Swedish Debut

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Global Railway Review.

This picture shows a hydrogen-powered Alstom Coradia iLint train near Hamburg

If you’re ever in Hamburg, take a ride to Buxtehude and take a ride to Cuxhaven.

These trains are now in service in Germany and have been ordered in quantity in Germany and have been demonstrated in Austria, Italy and The Netherlands.

August 26, 2021 Posted by | Hydrogen, Transport/Travel | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Norrbotniabanan Final Phase To Go Ahead

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on the Railway Gazette.

This is the first two paragraphs.

The government has decided to press ahead with completion of the Norrbotniabanan coastal railway linking Umeå and Luleå via Dåva and Skellefteå.

Recognising that ongoing investment in industrial development across the north of the country would drive demand for improved transport links, Infrastructure Minister Tomas Eneroth has instructed Trafikverket to continue planning work for the new line.

If you get your maps out, you’ll find that the Norrbotniabanan or North Bothnian Line is at the North of the Baltic Sea.

  • It’s also planned as a high speed line with an operating speed of 160 mph, which is faster than the East Coast Main Line in the UK.
  • It is also 170 miles long.
  • Journey time between Umeå and Luleå will be ninety minutes as opposed to four hours today.

Wikipedia also says this about connections at the Northern end.

Currently, the area is served by the Main Line Through Upper Norrland, which is located inland and with branch lines connected to various towns along the coast. To the north, the line will connect with the Main Line Through Upper Norrland and onwards along the Haparanda Line to connect to the Barents Region and the Finnish railway network. It will also connect to the Iron Ore Line.

Sounds like it will be a great place to go for a rail-oriented holiday.

 

 

August 11, 2021 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , | Leave a comment

United Airlines To Buy 100, 19-seat Electric Planes from Heart Aerospace

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Reuters.

This is the first paragraph.

United Airlines said on Tuesday it would buy 100 19-seat ES-19 electric planes from Swedish start-up Heart Aerospace, as the U.S. carrier eyes battery-powered aircraft for regional routes.

It looks fairly conventional, except that you don’t find many four-engined propeller driven aircraft these days.

This page on the Heart Aerospace web site, gives more details of the company and its plane.

I suggest you read the FAQ, as the last five sections give details on the use of the planes, as short-haul airliners and island hoppers.

What’s A Typical Route That The ES-19 Will Fly In 2026?

In answer to this question, the FAQ says this.

Our early adopter market will be very short flights where there is high demand. This will include island-hopping and flying over mountainous terrain, where the flight distance is significantly less than the road routes available.

I can certainly see these planes and other 19-seaters  island hopping and on cross-country routes all over the British Isles.

Other 19-seater Aircraft You May Have Flown

I have only flow in one and that was an Embraer Bandeirante from Norwich to Stavanger.

Others will have flown in a De Havilland Canada Twin Otter or the Britten-Norman Trilander.

Conclusion

This well-backed Swedish design could be a very widely-used airliner, if it meets the ambitious in-service date of 2026.

There are other designs being developed including the more unusual Faradair Aerospace BEHA.

Unlike the ES-19 it is not fully electric, but is powered by a small Honeywell gas turbine running on sustainable aviation fuel.

But the ES-19 looks the best yet!

 

N

July 15, 2021 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , | 3 Comments

Crossrail’s Inclined Lifts

This page on variably, shows the inclined lifts on Crossrail, at Liverpool Street station.

Take a look, as they are impressive. To my built-in video camera with an enormous instant-access store, they look like modern versions of the first inclined lift, I ever saw, which was on the Stockholm Metro.

If I remember correctly, the Swedish one was installed on if not an Angel-sized set of escalators, certainly one of a good length.

It looks like it was at Duvbo station.

Enjoy the video.

It’s not this set of escalators at Duvbo, as it is the other way round, but it certainly is very similar.

Are they available in bronze for the Northern reaches of the Piccadilly Line, where I suggested inclined lifts for step-free access in Thoughts On Step-Free Access At Manor House Station.

One could be built in like this short one at Greenford station.

I shall replace this picture with a better one.

June 17, 2021 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Massless Energy Storage: The Next Step In Battery Technology

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on AZOCleanTech.

This is the introductory paragraph.

In this environmentally conscious world, fossil fuels are being shunned in favor of renewables for electricity generation and transportation. Due to their periodic nature, excess energy generated by renewables is frequently stored in batteries. However, these often add extra weight to the cars and consumer electronics they power.

To solve the problem, researchers in Sweden have developed a structural battery.

Sounds like a good idea to me!

April 9, 2021 Posted by | Design, Energy, Energy Storage | , | Leave a comment