The Anonymous Widower

Completing The Bank Station Upgrade

I’m writing this post for two reasons.

The first is to inform people that in the Summer of 2021, there is going to be a closure of the Bank Branch of the Northern Line for several months.

The second, is to illustrate, how in a large transport system like London, good project management can carry out major works, without too much inconvenience to passengers.

This article on IanVisits is entitled Behind The Scenes At London Underground’s Bank Tube Station upgrade.

I suggest you read the article, to get the scale of the project.

In the Summer of 2021, a section of the Bank branch of the Northern line will close for roughly 3 months.

The main reason is so that the New Southbound tunnel can be joined to the existing Southbound tunnel, North and South of Bank station. Think of it as installing a by-pass round a village. Except it’s a railway and it’s around forty metres below ground.

Ian says this about what else will happen, whilst the Northern Line is closed.

While that’s going on, at Bank station, the old southbound tunnel will have it’s tracks filled in and turned into a new large concourse, while the currently hidden new side passages are cut through into the old northbound platform and finished off.

Come roughly September 2021, after a few months of closure, people will arrive at Bank station and see these huge new tunnels, the new escalators down to the DLR, the travolator to the Central line.

This approach is very common on the railways.

If a line has to be closed completely for a few months, say because a tunnel is being repaired, then during the closure, you do all the other tasks you can.

At Bank, where a new track is being connected, there will be no trains through the station for a few months. So all the other jobs will be done in this window.

There may also be other advantages. At Bank station, the Northbound track itself is not being radically changed, so it might be possible to use battery locomotives to bring in supplies and take out rubbish.

Summer 2021 Is Two And A Half Years Away

Project Planners have calculated and it will probably take until the end of 2020, for everything to be ready before the closure can take place, so that the joining of the tracks can begin.

But there could  other reasons, for the 2021 date.

Bank station is an important station on the Northern Line and closing it will cause a lot of inconvenience for passengers, many of whom will still be commuting to the City of London.

Some Big Projects Will Be Complete Before The Closure

Before Summer 2021, these big projects should have been completed.

  • One completed on Friday, when the new Bank Station entrance on Walbrook opened.
  • Crossrail will have opened.. On current forecasts nearly two years earlier.
  • The Northern City Line will be running new Class 717 trains into Moorgate station.
  • Travellers will have learned to use Thameslink as part of the Underground.

All of these projects will help passengers to cope with the Northern Line Closure at Bank station.

Bank Station Will Still Be Partially Open For Business

Bank station will not be fully-closed.

  • The Central Line will be working at Bank station, to something like full capacity.
  • The Waterloo & City Line will be working normally using the new Wallbrook entrance.
  • The Docklands Light Railway will be working, as is possible around all the work.
  • Some new and refurbished routes will connect the Central Line and Docklands Light Railway to the myriad station entrances around Bank Junction.
  • The Circle and District Lines will be working normally, through Monument station.

In addition, the City of London will have improved walking and cycling in the Square Mile.

Where Will Northern Line Trains Run During The Closure?

For a start, all Northern Line trains through Charing Cross station will be running normally.

The Northern Line Extension to Battersea might even have opened, which would give an extra Southern terminal to the Northern Line, which would help operation of the Charing Cross Branch.

Looking at the detailed tracks on carto.metro.free.fr, it appears that trains from the North can turn back at Euston and Moorgate.

Consider.

  • Euston will be in the throws of rebuilding for High Speed Two.
  • The Northern Line is the preferred route between Euston and the City.
  • Moorgate will be a fully step-free rebuilt station with connections to Crossrail and the Central Line.
  • Many people can walk to most parts of the Square Mile from Moorgate.

It looks to me, that it is most likely that Northern Line services will terminate at Moorgate during the closure of the Northern Line through Bank.

Northern Line trains approaching the City from the South have no such convenient turn back between Kennington and Bank stations.

I think the best direct service passengers from the Morden Branch to the City can expect will be a not-very-frequent shuttle service to London Bridge.

Most who need to go to Bank station from the South will find alternative routes and there are several.

  • Travel to London Bridge and walk across the river.
  • Change to the Waterloo and City Line at Waterloo.
  • Change to the Circle and District Lines at Embankment.
  • Change to the Central Line at Tottenham Court Road
  • Change to Crossrail at Tottenham Court Road and walk from Moorgate.

It should also be remembered, that as the closure is taking place in the Summer holidays, travellers should cope.

Conclusion

As Project Managers always seem to say.

You must get your ducks in a row!

So in this example, I would have felt that to have rebuilt Bank station without completion of the following projects.

  • Crossrail
  • Bank Station Walbrook Entrance

Would have been a lot harder.

This example also means that you must get your large projects in the right order, so they help each other to be delivered on time.

London has several large station interchange projects in the pipeline.

  • Camden Town station
  • East Croydon station
  • Holborn station.
  • Oxford Circus station
  • Victoria station

Which I believe should be done in the optimal order, so that travellers suffer the least disruption.

Smaller projects like a second entrance At Walthamstow Central station should probably be done at a time, when money and resources are available.

 

December 2, 2018 Posted by | Transport | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Just Before The First Rush Hour At The New Bank Station Walbrook Entrance

I took these pictures just before four this evening.

One station guy told me that the low levels of passengers were to be expected and predicted that Tuesday would see a large increase of passengers, as word spread that the entrance was open.

November 30, 2018 Posted by | Transport | , , | Leave a comment

The Bank Station Walbrook Entrance Opened Today

I was there at ten o’clock this morning to see the new Walbrook Entrance to Bank station open.

There are various features of the design that are excellent.

  • It looks like the entrance has been designed to be able to handle the full capacity of the uprated Waterloo & City Line, running higher capacity new trains with a higher capacity and possibly a higher frequency.
  • The stairs are wide and built to a standard, that will tempt  fit people to use them at busy times.
  • They will also be very safe in emergencies.
  • The route from the pedestrianised Walbrook to the gateline is clear and level, so it should handle very large numbers of passengers in safety.

It should be noted that those I spoke to, liked the entrance.

Conclusion

London and other cities need more entrances to subways and underground railways like this.

It must be one of the best in London, ranking alongside these stations on the Jubilee Line.

  • Canary Wharf
  • Canada Water
  • North Greenwich
  • Westminster

And the new entrances at Bond Street, Kings Cross St. Pancras and Victoria.

 

November 30, 2018 Posted by | Transport | , , , , | 4 Comments

Bank Station Walbrook Entrance – 28th November 2018

I took these pictures this morning.

Note.

  1. Judging by the dates on the poster, which says that there will be a closure of the Waterloo & City Line on the weekend of December 1/2, so that work can be done on the passageway, I wouldn’t be surprised to see the entrance opened in early December
  2. I also had a good look at the white board and it looks like a TV screen. Rather upmarket for the London Underground!
  3. Looking through the open door, I could see that the lights on the ticket machines were on!

On a second visit, I was told that the entrance opens at 10:00 on Friday.

November 28, 2018 Posted by | Transport | , , | Leave a comment

The New Entrance To Bank Station Underneath The Bloomberg Building

It looks like everything is now ready on Walbrook for the new entrance to Bank station to be opened, with all the barriers cleared away.

I couldn’t work out, whether the white screen was a video display or just a picture frame for a tube map. It was certainly quality and not one of the the usual.

There is still nothing on the Internet about when it opens.

November 27, 2018 Posted by | Transport | , , | 2 Comments

Is London Going To Get A Christmas Present From Michael Bloomberg?

I took this picture in June of the fire doors that connect to the new station entrance under the Bloomberg building from the travelator, the connecting tunnel and the Waterloo and City Line platforms.

I took this picture today.

It looks like the entrance is nearer to completion.

I did ask a station-man and he thought it would open in a couple of weeks.

November 24, 2018 Posted by | Transport | , , , | Leave a comment

New Bank Tube Station Entrance In Final Stages Ahead Of Opening

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on IanVisits.

Ian suggests that the new entrance under the Bloomberg Building, which will give better access to the Waterloo and City Line, will open in August 2018.

This picture shows the covered Underground roundel on the side of the Bloomberg Building.

Note the workers putting scaffolding on the truck behind.

Underground, these fire doors, which lead to the new escalators and lifts, look ready to be opened for passengers in the area between the travelator, the connecting tunnel and the Waterloo and City Line platforms.

IWill the area be tiled or just painted?

described the tunnel to the left with the blue entrance rail in The New Tunnel Under Bank Station.

This picture was taken from the tunnel on the left, looking at this area.

The tunnel takes passengers right into the heart of the station.

Other Developments

The new entrance at Bank station is the first of several major transport developments, that will happen in the next few years.

New Trains On The Northern City Line In Autumn 2018

The Northern City Line is London’s forgotten train line, with a history coloured by the tragic accident at Moorgate in 1975.

The first development, a year or so ago, saw the Northern City Line introduce seven days a week working.

Now, the Class 313 trains, which are some of the oldest in the UK, are being replaced with new Class 717 trains, that will offer increased capacity, frequency and passenger comfort.

The Northern City Line terminus at Moorgate station will also be linked directly to Crossrail, when that line opens.

For many travellers in the Northern part of London and Hertfordshire, their route to the City will be much improved.

The final frequency has not been published, but it looks like there will be at least twelve tph on the Northern City Line to and from Moorgate station.

With a step-free cross-platform interchange at Highbury & Islington station, effectively Moorgate station will become a second Southern terminus of the Victoria Line.

Crossrail Between Paddington And Abbey Wood Stations In December 2018

This will be the first phase to be delivered and Crossrail will initially provide a twelve trains per hour (tph) service between Paddington and Abbey Wood stations from December 2018.

This will mean that the double-ended Jumbo Crossrail station, which will serve Moorgate station at its Western end and Liverpool Street station at its Eastern end, will open a short walking distance to the North of Bank station.

For those not wanting to walk, the link will also be one stop on the Central or Northern Lines.

Crossrail Between Paddington And Abbey Wood Stations In May 2019

This will be the second phase to be delivered and Crossrail will initially be provided a twelve tph service between Paddington and Shenfield stations from May 2019.

Crossrail To Heathrow And Reading In December 2019

The full Crossrail service will open in December 2019 and will provide the following services from Moorgate-Liverpool Street.

  • Six tph to Heathrow
  • Two tph to Reading
  • Two tph to Maindenhead
  • Twelve tph to Abbey Wood
  • Twelve tph to Shenfield

In the Central section, there will be twenty-four tph between Padsdington and Whitechapel stations.

Bank Station Upgrade In 2022

Bank station is being upgraded and this is said in Wikipedia.

TfL is also retunnelling and widening the Northern line platforms, and adding lifts and new entrances on King William Street and Cannon Street. The work, agreed in 2015, will be carried out from 2016 to 2022 and will boost capacity by 40%, with 12 new escalators, 3 new lifts and a new travelator (or moving walkway) to connect the Northern Line and DLR to the Central Line.

It is a massive upgrade, as this visualisation shows.

Note that the two larger diameter tunnels at the left of this visualisation are the tunnels and platforms for the Central Line. The third tunnel is the pedestrian tunnel that links the Waterloo and City Line to the main station.

The capacity upgrade at Bank station, will surely mean more people will be drawn to the area.

Bank Junction Improvements

The City of London has a project called All Change At Bank, which aims to improve the roads and pedestrian routes at Bank Junction.

Their web site gives these objectives.

  • Reduce casualties by simplifying the junction
  • Reduce pedestrian crowding levels
  • Improve air quality
  • Improve the perception of place, as a place to spend time in rather than pass through.

At present Bank Junction is restricted to buses and cyclists on Monday to Friday, between 0700 and 1900.

I wouldn’t be surprised to see this restriction increased, especially as more pedestrians are drawn to the City at weekends and in the evening.

The Future Of The City As A Leisure And Tourist Destination

When I lived in the City in the early seventies, nothing happened in the City in the evenings or at the weekends.

Over the years, the City has started to use these freer times for other activities.

  • The Barbican Arts Centre and Tate Modern have opened.
  • Quality shopping has greatly increased and improved.
  • Pubs, bars and restaurants have often increased their hours.
  • Better walking routs along and over the Thames have opened.

With its superb transport links, I can see the City of London becomes a much more important leisure and tourist destination.

Conclusion

The City of London is becoming a 24/7 area of London and the Waterloo and City Line must go with the flow.

It should run seven days a week, as do all other Underground lines.

Eventually, there will be a need for a Night Drain!

 

 

June 20, 2018 Posted by | Transport | , , , , , | 4 Comments

Improvements At Bank Station

As I passed Bank station, there was a lot going on in the area and in the short walk to Cannon Street station.

What is happening on the surface, is only small beer compasred to what is going on under the ground.

This visualisation, shows what the new Bank station will look like.

Completion dates look like 2017 for the Walbrook entrance and 2021 for the completed Bank station.

I think that this development will have one of the largest effects of any transport-related project in London.

September 27, 2016 Posted by | Transport | , , , , | 1 Comment

The Walbrook Entrance To Bank Station

This press release from TfL is entitled BANK STATION: WORK STARTS ON A NEW ENTRANCE.

It describes how work has started to fit out the new Walbrook entrance, which will give step-free accress  to the Waterloo and City Line.

So I went to have a look.

I didn’t see an obvious entrance, but is it actually on the north-west corner where Walbrook joins Cannon Street.

This Google Map shows the area.

The New Walbrook Square Entrance At Bank Station

The New Walbrook Square Entrance At Bank Station

Cannon Street station is the brown and white roofed building at the bottom, which is south-east of the junction of Walbrook and Cannon Street. The big bare site on the opposite quadrant of the junction, now contains Walbrook Square, with the station entrance to be built on or close to the junction on the Walbrook side of the building.

Note the three other main entrances to Bank station.

  • The roundel at the top in the middle is main entrance under the major road junction called Bank.
  • The roundel at the bottom-right indicates the Monument entrance.
  • The McDonald’s on Cannon Street will be replaced by the new Cannon Street entrance.

The station certainly has the area covered, when you add in all the smaller entrances.

I returned a few days later on a Sunday in the sun. This picture from the hoardings outside the construction side, shows the corner of the building opposite Cannon Street station.

The Walbrook Entrance To Bank Station

The Walbrook Entrance To Bank Station

That looks like a square with a cafe to me.

I assume the Walbrook entrance to Bank station is somewhere behind.

 

January 7, 2016 Posted by | Transport | , , , | 1 Comment