The Anonymous Widower

High Speed Two Publish Rural Footbridge Design

High Speed Two have published their rural footbridge design on this page of their web site.

This image from High Speed Two shows an artist’s impression of the bridge.

 

This is High Speed Two’s own thoughts on the design.

Made of weathering steel, the sides of the lightweight bridges will lean outwards to maximise views of the sky and improve the experience of people crossing the railway.

Weathering steel – which ages naturally to a russet brown colour – was chosen to help match the tone of the surrounding countryside, while the plates that form the structure of the bridges will be angled to appear narrower and lighter.

To emphasise the sense of lightness, each span will be slightly higher in the middle so that they appear to leap over the railway. Most of the bridges will consist of just one 42m span, with extra spans added where necessary to create bridges of up to 102m long.

The design of the bridge would appear to be a good compromise between accessibility, cost, ease of construction and installation and practicality.

The article also covers other topics.

Step-Free

This paragraph explains how the bridges will be step-free.

In order to improve efficiency of manufacturing and assembly, all the bridges will have the same basic form, with the approach paths built into the earthworks on either side of the bridge. This also means that all the footbridges will effectively be step-free.

I can see bridges of this type being built at other rural locations.

A Single-Platform Station

These images show James Cook station in Middlesbrough.

High Speed Two’s rural bridge design could be used as part of a design for a step-free station on a rural line.

Bridleways

The footbridge can be used for a bridge on a bridleway.

Designed with guidance from the British Horse Society, the bridges which carry bridleways will follow the same basic pattern, with a recycled, non-slip rubber deck and the structure acting like a baffle to stop horses being distracted by passing trains.

Footbridges will be 2.5m wide, while bridleways will be 3.5m wide to allow two horses to pass comfortably and safely.

It should be remembered, that horses are flight animals and if they are startled they run, so if say a train went under the bridge, when they were on top, they would most likely go forward and cross the bridge quickly.

I would happily have ridden  my stallion; Vague Shot over a bridge like this.

I also think, the design of the bridge in the landscape should allow riders to approach to a safe distance from the bridge and perhaps watch a train or two go through.

Other Animals

I can see other animals like badgers, foxes and hares using a bridge like this.

I also think, that on classic railways, bridges like these could be used to allow farmers to move sheep or possibly cattle over a railway, with some simple design changes.

Conclusion

This bridge has more applications, than the initial one, for which it was designed.

July 22, 2022 Posted by | Design, Transport/Travel | , , , , , | 2 Comments

Stone Crossing Station – June 27th 2022

I changed trains yesterday at Stone Crossing station and took these pictures.

Note.

  1. It is a basic station with two long platforms.
  2. There is a bridge at one end.
  3. More houses are being built nearby, behind the trees.

It needs upgrading to the Twentieth Century.

A Second Visit To Stone Crossing Station

As I wanted to look at the footbridge, I went back again today.

This looks very much like an interim design to get passengers and pedestrians across the line safety.

A Crossrail To Ebbsfleet Station

This station will need to be made step-free, if Crossrail is extended to Ebbsfleet station.

The station will be handling ten trains per hour (tph) in both directions.

 

 

June 28, 2022 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , , | 1 Comment

Network Rail Invest In A New Footbridge For Goring-by-Sea

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Rail Technology Magazine.

It describes work being done at Goring-by-Sea station, which includes.

  • Platform lengthening.
  • Refurbishment of the footbridge.

This Google Map shows the station.

 

Note the footbridge, by the level crossing, at the Western end of the station.

It would appear, that the platform lengthening is being done to support a new timetable, whilst Gatwick Airport station is upgraded.

I wouldn’t be surprised to see the Arundel Chord built, as has been proposed as a Beeching Reversal project, which I wrote about in Beeching Reversal – Arundel Chord.

I visited on the 8th of December 2020 and took these pictures.

Note.

  1. It appears the Eastbound platform has been extended.
  2. From what I could see of the footbridge, it is certainly showing its age and needs a make-over.
  3. Whilst I was there, the level crossing by the station, was shut for thirteen minutes.

Are Network Rail going to do something about the level crossing?

 

 

December 7, 2020 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , | 1 Comment

Composite Footbridge Under Development

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Railway Gazette.

This is the introductory paragraph.

Network Rail has become a Tier 1 member of the National Composites Centre as part of the Futura project to develop a composite footbridge based on a concept designed by Marks Barfield Architects and COWI.

This picture shows the concept.

Network Rail seem to spend a lot of time and money on footbridge designs.

There was the Network Rail/RIBA Footbridge Design Competition, which resulted in this winning design.

I wrote Winner Announced In The Network Rail Footbridge Design Ideas Competition in April 2019.

All now seems to be very quiet on this footbridge design.

Are Network Rail engineers members of the Institute of Meetings Engineers?

I was first introduced to the existence of this august body around 1971.

I am very Marxist (Groucho tendency) on the subject of clubs and institutes and would never join any, that would have me as a member.

Let’s Get Busy!

Both these bridges can be fitted into many stations, by the following sequence of simple operations.

  • Create a level space on either side of the tracks.
  • Add any necessary services like an electricity supply for lift and lighting and any necessary drainage.
  • Lift the bridge into place from a spcial train with a crane.
  • Connect any electrical supply for lifts and test.

These types of bridges can surely be installed quickly in scores of locations.

In Garforth Station To Go Step-Free, I discuss how such a bridge could be installed quickly at Garforth station.

This is surely, the sort of project we need to stimulate the economy after we give the covids, the proverbial boot.

 

 

 

 

 

September 21, 2020 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , | Leave a comment

Eridge Station – 23rd June 2020

Eridge station is going to have a makeover, which starts this weekend.

So I went to have a look and took these pictures.

Note.

  1. The station certainly needs a new footbridge.
  2. The builders were clearing a work site to get access to the station.
  3. The station will be kept open throughout the work according to this article on Crowborough Life.

The station could end up as a good mix of ancient and modern.

June 24, 2020 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , | Leave a comment

Syon Lane Station – 26th May 2020

These pictures show the current state of Syon Lane station.

A few questions.

Is The Station Complete?

The stairs are blocked off, but most appears complete. Perhaps, serious testing of the lifts are needed.

Has the testing been held up by COVID-19?

Will There Be A Second Lift Tower?

As the walkway is still closed off, I couldn’t check at the top, but it does look there is space for a second lift tower on the London-bound platform.

What Is Happening Behind The London-Bound Platform?

Behind the London-bound platform is a patch of waste land and some scruffy garages.

Is the site being cleared? And to what purpose?

 

May 28, 2020 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , | 2 Comments

Syon Lane Station – 24th February 2020

These pictures show the current state of the new footbridge at Syon Lane station.

In my last post on the 4th of January, I said this.

I  would have thought, it could have been more integrated with the road bridge. Perhaps that is to be replaced?

It does look like the footbridge is being integrated with the road bridge.

  • The entrance will lead to a walkway to the lifts and across the tracks.
  • The tower, lift and stairs on the Hounslow-bound platform have been installed.
  • Note the brackets on the steel-work, where the walkway across the tracks will connect.
  • Stairs will lead down from the walkway on the London-bound platform.
  • I would assume that a tower and lift will be built for the London-bound platform on the opposite side to the tracks. It looks like foundations could be being dug!

I think it is one of those designs that could be filed under Not Very Pretty, But It Works!

I also feel that the design of the footbridge has been influenced by the need to build it easily, as in constructing most bridges of this type, the towers are often built first.

But with this bridge, the second tower might get in the way of installing the walkway across the tracks.

February 24, 2020 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , | Leave a comment

Syon Lane Station – 28th October 2019

Work seems to be progressing slowing on the footbridge at Syon Lane station.

The foundations seem substantial, which perhaps indicates that the bridge won’t be a simple prefabricated one, but more one with brick towers and a heavy steel bridge.

Could this bridge be being built in the same style as the new bridge at Ewell West station, which I described in Ewell West Station Has A New Step-Free Footbridge?

October 28, 2019 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , | Leave a comment

Ewell West Station Has A New Step-Free Footbridge

Ewell West station has a new step-free footbridge.

As the pictures show it is a high-quality structure.

There are some pictures of the station in Before Crossrail 2 – Ewell West, which is dated as 23rd July, 2015.

I finished that post, with this statement.

It is not a station, that needs much work for Crossrail 2 except for a modern enclosed footbridge with lifts and a refurbishment.

I don’t think the station building has been refurbished yet, but the platforms and their accessories are high quality and a new posh bike facility has been built.

Is Ewell West station now ready for Crossrail 2?

Conclusion

Should the first phase of Crossrail 2 or any other rail project for that matter, be to refurbish all existing stations and track, that will be used in the project?

  • Existing passengers get some benefit early and are perhaps more amenable to the disruption caused by some later phases of the new project.
  • If the main project gets delayed, at least something has been delivered.
  • The cash flow of the project is spread over a more manageable time-scale.
  • Ridership might be increased.

If other Crossrail 2 stations or suburban stations in Birmingham, Leeds, Manchester or Sheffield are refurbished to this standard, I’m sure that few will complain.

 

October 28, 2019 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , | 1 Comment

The Footbridges Over The Railway At Lincoln

Both footbridges at Lincoln station over the railway are now complete.

This Google Map shows their location.

These pictures show the bridge at the High Street level crossing, which is the nearest one to the station.

It is not your average footbridge with lifts across a railway.

These pictures show the bridge at the Brayford Wharf East level Crossing, which is the one further to the West.

I like this unusually-designed bridge.

It is not step-free, but it does offer shelter whilst you wait for the level crossing to open.

Conclusion

Lincoln has now got two unusual footbridges over the railway.

 

October 25, 2019 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , | Leave a comment