The Anonymous Widower

Step-Free Provision On Elizabeth Line West Of Paddington

The stations may be step-free between street and platform, but West of Paddington, there does not appear to be step-free access between the platform and the train.

These pictures show a selection of stops.

Compare these steps of a few inches, with those I showed in Step-Free Access Between Train And Platform On The Elizabeth Line.

These pictures were taken between Woolwich and Paddington stations and show first class step-free access between train and platform.

The step-free access on the Western branch of the Elizabeth Line does not appear to be up to the standard expected of a world class railway.

Is The Current Arrangement Only Temporary?

I took these pictures at Padding Station today of a Class 345 train alongside Platform 10.

Note.

  1. There are large gaps.
  2. I had a chat with a station guy, who’d just unloaded two wheelchair passengers from the train using a ramp.
  3. He felt things could be improved.
  4. I feel that level access for the Elizabeth Line at Paddington is important.

But when the Elizabeth Line is fully connected, it will be connected to a series of Central London stations, including Paddington, that will have full step-free access between the train and the platform.

So the current arrangement will be improved dramatically in a few months.

The Visitor To London In A Wheel-Chair

The Central London section of the Elizabeth Line between Paddington and Whitechapel or Woolwich stations is step-free between street and train.

So a visitor to London in a wheel-chair might choose to stay in a hotel on this easy section of the Elizabeth Line to make the most of their stay.

But because of the lack of step-free access between train and platform outside of the Central London section, would they have trouble visiting places like Windsor, which would require a change of trains at Slough?

Would It Be Possible To Separate Elizabeth Line and Great Western Railway Services?

Consider.

  • Great Western Railway services between Paddington and Didcot Parkway use the Elizabeth Line platforms at Ealing Broadway, Hayes and Harlington, West Drayton, Slough, Maidenhead, Twyford and Reading.
  • In addition, some express trains stop at Slough and Ealing Broadway.
  • There are also freight trains passing through.

It might be sensible to move the Paddington and Didcot Parkway service to the Elizabeth Line and adjust platform heights appropriately.

June 22, 2022 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , | 7 Comments

A Walk Around Woolwich – 15th June 2022

I went to Woolwich station on the Elizabeth Line today and had a walk around.

Note.

  1. Woolwich station is a simple station with only three escalators at one end direct to the platforms, which are in a tunnel.
  2. Both platforms have platform edge doors and a similar decor to some platforms on the Jubilee Line Extension.
  3. The escalator shaft and the booking hall are lined in brick.
  4. Next to the station is a very large Marks & Spencer Food store.
  5. Outside the station is large green with a pub on one side.
  6. Over the top of the station are a lot of flats.

Is this the way that modern housing developments should be designed? It’s certainly better than some I’ve seen.

It’s certainly come on a lot, since I wrote Exploring The Woolwich Station Box, which has a gallery of what the station looked like in February 2013.

The Woolwich Foot Tunnel

My walk continued under the Thames, through the Woolwich foot tunnel.

It was the first time I’d used this tunnel.

On the other side, I got a bus to London City Airport, from where I got the Docklands Light Railway back to Woolwich Arsenal and then walked back to the Elizabeth Line station to come home.

I Doubt I’ll Use The Marks & Spencer At Woolwich Much!

The store was not designed in a way I liked.

  • Many of the goods, were behind glass doors, which meant I needed three hands to put items in my basket.
  • There weren’t many staff in the store.
  • It was difficult finding the goods I needed.
  • It was all self-service tills of the type I didn’t like.

These may be only personal preferences, but then there must be many like me who have a gammy hand for some reason.

It’s a pity really, as it is such a convenient location for a store. The only other M & S store close to the Elizabeth Line is the one at Paddington, which I use regularly.

June 15, 2022 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , , , , | 2 Comments

How Would Opening Crossrail Affect The Covids In London?

There seems to be very little on the Internet about this, that I can find, Partly because if you search for Crossrail and Covid-19 you get lots of articles about how the virus is delaying construction.

These are a few of my thoughts.

The Class 345 Trains

Crossrail’s Class 345 trains are 205 metres long and can hold 1500 passengers.

  • The passenger density is 7.3 passengers per metre, but the trains have three doors per car, as opposed to others like the Class 700 trains, which have a similar passenger density and only two doors.
  • Would the space and the wide doors, make social-distancing easier at all times?
  • I’ve ridden these trains several times during the pandemic and their full air-conditioning for the tunnels, would surely be ideal to help keep the trains free of the virus, by changing the air regularly.
  • The trains are walk-through, which means you can walk-away from someone who looks dodgy.

There will probably be some better trains to reduce the spreading of the virus, but I doubt there will be that many.

The Stations

I’ve only been in two Crossrail stations.

These are pictures taken in the Woolwich station box.

October 15, 2020 Posted by | Design, Health, Transport/Travel | , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Legal & General Has Acquired One Of The Last Major Crossrail Development Sites

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on City AM.

There have been several stories like this is recent months and I think it shows how Crossrail will generate new housing an business developments across London.

July 4, 2018 Posted by | Transport/Travel, World | , , , | Leave a comment

Development At The Royal Arsenal

The historic Royal Arsenal site at Woolwich is being developed.

Wikipedia gives a good summary of present day developments.

This is the summary.

The sprawling Arsenal site is now one of the focal points for redevelopment in the Thames Gateway zone, but the links to its historic past are not lost. Many notable buildings in the historic original (West) site are being retained in the redevelopment; the site includes Firepower – The Royal Artillery Museum telling the story of the Royal Artillery, and Greenwich Heritage Centre which tells the story of Woolwich, including the Royal Arsenal. Parts of the Royal Arsenal have been used to build residential and commercial buildings. One of the earliest developments was Royal Artillery Quays, a series of glass towers rising along the riverside built by Barratt Homes in 2003.

Underneath the latest developments is the new Woolwich station for Crossrail.

These are some pictures I took.

According to Wikipedia it is one of the biggest concentrations of Grade I and Grade II listed buildings converted for residential use.

This aerial picture shows the site from the South East.

woolwichstation

The station is behind the towers along the main road.

Woolwich Station As An Interchange

Woolwich station has not been designed as an intended interchange, but it is only a short walk away from Woolwich Arsenal station, which has connections to Southeastern and DLR services.

As the walking connection passes several useful shops including a large Marks and Spencer food store, who knows how people will use the interchange?

 

 

 

 

January 27, 2017 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , | 2 Comments

Exploring The Woolwich Station Box

Berkeley Homes had the excellent idea of having an open day to show those that wanted the inside of the new Crossrail station box at Woolwich.

It was a very professionally organised visit and we had met in the Dial Arch pub and then walked down into where in a few years, trains will be either rushing through at up to 100 kph or stopping to drop off and pick up passengers.

I have called the two ends of the box, London and Kent.  The former is the western end and the next station is Canary Wharf, whereas the other is the eastern end that leads to Abbey Wood.

There are going to be some stunning pictures here, when the tunneling machines break through on their way from Plumstead to Canary Wharf.

February 27, 2013 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , , , | 5 Comments