The Anonymous Widower

Walking Along Moorgate – 30th September 2020

I took these pictures as I walked from North to South along Moorgate today from the bus stop by Finsbury Square.

 

Note.

  1. I did cross the road three times.
  2. The building site behind the blue hoardings in some of the first pictures, looks like it could be another tall building.
  3. The tower looming in the background of several of the pictures is Citypoint, which was originally built in 1967 and refurbished in 2000.
  4. The new looking building, with the Barclays branch at street level, is not new but another refurbished building, that has been finished in the last few months.
  5. The older red and white building is Moorgate station. There is nothing to indicate that this building will be rebuilt.
  6. The odd shaped building to the South of the station is Moor House.
  7. A large new entrance to the station, with an office block on top is being built between the original station entrance and Moor House.
  8. Between the new station entrance and Moorgate, 101 Moorgate is being built.

There is certainly, a lot of all types of property development going on at Moorgate station, which after Crossrail opens will become the Western entrance to the Crossrail station at Liverpool Street station.

This 3D Google Map shows Moorgate.

101 Moorgate is marked with a red arrow.

A Crossrail Video Of Liverpool Street Station

This video shows the design of Crossrail’s Liverpool Street station.

This screen-capture from the video shows a possible future Moorgate.

Note the new buildings at 101 Moorgate and the current Moorgate station.

These are related posts on the design of the Crossrail station at Moorgate and Liverpool Street.

The station could become the major one for the City of London.

Extending the Northern City Line To The South

This was intended by the builders of the Northern City Line and they intended to take the route to just North of Bank station at Lothbury.

In the Wikipedia entry for Moor House, this is said.

Completed in 2004, it was the first building to be designed for the forthcoming Crossrail, with a ventilation shaft to the station underneath the building. When built, it had the deepest foundations in London, which reach down 57 metres (187 ft) and are specifically designed to withstand further tunneling below it in the future.

I suspect that could mean that Moor House won’t get in the way of any further railway development.

In the Wikipedia entry for the Northern City Line, this is said about possible developments planned after World War 2.

After the war there were proposals to extend the Northern City Line north and south. The London Plan Working Party Report of 1949 proposed several new lines and suburban electrification schemes for London, lettered from A to M. The lower-priority routes J and K would have seen the Northern City Line extended to Woolwich (Route J) and Crystal Palace (Route K), retaining the “Northern Heights” extensions to Edgware and Alexandra Palace. The lines would have run in small-diameter tube tunnels south from Moorgate to Bank and London Bridge. The “K” branch would have run under Peckham to Peckham Rye, joining the old Crystal Palace (High Level) branch (which was still open in 1949) near Lordship Lane. Nothing came of these proposals, and the Edgware, Alexandra Palace and Crystal Palace (High Level) branches were all closed to passengers in 1954. As a result, the Northern City Line remained isolated from the rest of the network.

Note.

  • The proposed J branch to Woolwich has been covered by Crossrail calling at both Moorgate and Woolwich.
  • The proposed K branch to Peckham Rye and Crystal Palace has been covered by Crossrail and the London Overground with a change at Whitechapel.

So why bother to open up the possibility by designing Moor House for more tunnels to be bored?

As the London Plan Working Party Report of 1949 indicated several more lines and electrification were proposed.

Also during the war several deep-level shelters were built under Underground stations. Wikipedia says this about the background to the shelters.

Each shelter consists of a pair of parallel tunnels 16 feet 6 inches (5.03 m) in diameter and 1,200 feet (370 m) long. Each tunnel is subdivided into two decks, and each shelter was designed to hold up to 8,000 people. It was planned that after the war the shelters would be used as part of new express tube lines paralleling parts of the existing Northern and Central lines. Existing tube lines typically had 11-foot-8.25-inch (3.56 m) diameter running tunnels and about 21 feet (6.4 m) at stations; thus the shelter tunnels would not have been suitable as platform tunnels and were constructed at stations the new lines would have bypassed. However, they would have been suitable as running tunnels for main-line size trains. (One existing tube, the Northern City Line opened in 1904, used a similar size of tunnel for this reason, although in fact main-line trains did not use it until 1976.)

Shelters were planned on the Northern Line at Belsize ParkCamden TownGoodge StreetStockwellClapham NorthClapham Common, and Clapham South on the Northern Line. Did London Transport do a full survey of the Northern Line before the war and leave documents saying where an express Northern Line could be easily built.

My mother told me about these plans and as her best friend worked in Personnel at London Transport, she probably knew more than the average suburban housewife, who worked part-time for my father as a book-keeper.

After Crossrail opens and Moorgate station and the Bank station Upgrade are completed will it be possible to bore two new full-size tunnels underneath the Northern Line and Moor House and other buildings on the route to create a Northern Line Express service?

Consider.

  • The tunnels would be very deep and suitable for full-size trains.
  • Moorgate, Bank and London Bridge stations will have all been rebuilt in the last twenty years, so hopefully, they have been built to allow tunnels for a Northern Line Express service to pass through.
  • The Northern Line Express would take the pressure off the City Branch of the Northern Line?
  • Initially, the line might terminate under London Bridge station in perhaps a two platform station.
  • Modern digital signalling would allow up to 24 trains per hour (tph) on the section between London Bridge and Alexandra Palace station and 12 tph on the Welwyn Garden City and Stevenage branches

It would be a lot easier to build than Crossrail 2 and would give some of the benefits.

An Extension To North Cheam?

The Wikipedia entry for Morden station has this paragraph.

A post-war review of rail transport in the London area produced a report in 1946 that proposed many new lines and identified the Morden branch as being the most overcrowded section of the London Underground, needing additional capacity. To relieve the congestion and to provide a new service south of Morden, the report recommended construction of a second pair of tunnels beneath the northern line’s tunnels from Tooting Broadway to Kennington and an extension from Morden to North Cheam. Trains using the existing tunnels would start and end at Tooting Broadway with the service in the new tunnels joining the existing tunnels to Morden. The extension to North Cheam would run in tunnel. Designated as routes 10 and 11, these proposals were not developed by the London Passenger Transport Board or its successor organisations.

Perhaps, the solution would be to bore two new deep full-size tunnels from Moorgate to Tooting Broadway.

  • The Northern Line Express trains couldn’t continue to Morden, as they would be too big for the existing tunnels.
  • So they would have to turn back at Tooting Broadway station.
  • The stations between Kennington and Morden, that are in need of improvement could be updated.
  • I would design the interchange between Northern Line Express and Northern Line trains at Tooting Broadway station as a step-free cross-platform interchange.

The Wikipedia entry for North Cheam station, describes the extension to the station.

  • It would have been in tunnel from Morden.
  • There would be an intermediate station at Morden South station.
  • It didn’t think much of the economics.
  • I would suspect that the tunnel would run under the A 24.
  • The tunnel would be just under three miles long.

I wonder, if the extra distance, made operation of the line easier.

I estimate that a train could go from Morden to North Cheam stations and back in under ten minutes.

  • This would allow 6 tph with a single tunnel and track between the two stations.
  • The two new stations; North Cheam and Morden South could be single platform.
  • The signalling could be simplified.

The extension could be more affordable.

 

 

September 30, 2020 Posted by | Transport | , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Plans For North Kensington Crossrail Station Back On Track

The title of this post is the same as that of this article on London News Online.

The first two paragraphs say it all.

Proposals for north Kensington to get its own station on the long-delayed Crossrail project have been put back on track.

Kensington and Chelsea council has confirmed it is in talks with Network Rail on producing a feasibility study that could lead to the “Kensal Portobello Station” being built.

According to Wikipedia, if this station is built it will be called Ladbroke Grove station. Wikipedia says this about its location.

In March 2017, it was announced TfL was considering a Crossrail station in Kensal on site of a former gasworks and would be between Old Oak Common and Paddington.

The article says this about the precise location and plans for the area.

Canal Way, near the Kensington Gas Works and a Sainsbury’s superstore, is being eyed up as a location for the station.

Meanwhile, the council’s 2019 Local Plan refers to the area as the ‘Kensal Canalside Opportunity Area’, and says 3,500 homes could eventually be built there.

This is a Google Map of the area.

Note.

  1. The Grand Union Canal curving East-West in the top half of the map.
  2. There looks to be a substantial amount of green algae in the canal.
  3. The Great Western Main Line passing East-West in the bottom half of the map.
  4. Kensington Gas Works, a cleared site and a Sainsbury’s superstore, lie between the canal and the railway.
  5. Canal Way threads itself through to the North of the railway.

Crossrail uses the Northern pair of tracks closest to Canal Way.

Access To The Kensal Canalside Opportunity Area

Consider.

  • Canal Way doesn’t appear to have easy access at the Western end of the site.
  • Canal Way connects at the Eastern end to a roundabout on Ladbroke Grove.
  • How many vehicle journeys are 3,500 homes going to generate?
  • I have walked along the towpath of the Grand Union Canal.

I would feel that a Crossrail station to serve the development would improve access by a substantial amount.

This Google Map shows Canal Way and the railway.

Note.

  1. The Southern part of Sainsbury’s car park is at the top of the map.
  2. It would appear that there is space for a station.
  3. There appears to be a development site on the other side of the railway. Would a foot-bridge over the railway be a good idea?

The station would probably be served by between six and ten trains per hour.

Exploring The North Side Of The Railway

These pictures were taken on the North Side of the Railway, as I walked up Ladbroke Grove and into the Sainsbury’s site.

Is the traffic congestion always this bad?

Ladbroke Grove Station Site From The Railway

I took these pictures from a Crossrail train, running towards Paddington.

There would appear to be space for a station.

Conclusion

Because of the number of homes proposed for the site and the limited access, I feel that a station at this location is essential. Especially, as cars and buses seemed to be taking fifteen minutes to enter and exit the site.

I also think, there needs to be a pedestrian bridge over the railway to separate the pedestrians from the traffic.

September 26, 2020 Posted by | Transport | , , , | 10 Comments

Another Space To Be Filled

This Google Map shows the City of London North of Moorgate station.

Note the crossroads, where South Place goes East from the A501, which has LEON and Boots on the West side and Barclays Bank on the East.

The South-East corner of the crossroads has been redeveloped and now it the time for the North-West corner to be redeveloped.

The pictures show that the site has been cleared.

  • At appears that the site will be a development called 20 Ropemaker Street.
  • It will be up to 27 stories high.
  • It will be 457,000 square feet of offices.
  • There will be retail premises along Finsbury Pavement opposite Gap and Marks & Spencer.
  • The building will be the new London headquarters for Linklakers LLP.

There are also hints on the Internet, that the main entrance will be opposite the entrance for Moorgate station, with all its connections to the following.

Circle Line

  • Crossrail
  • Hammersmith  & City  Line
  • Metropolitan Line
  • Northern Line
  • Northern City Line

It looks to me that the developers are taking advantage of the transport developments.

 

March 6, 2020 Posted by | Transport, World | , , , | Leave a comment

Paddington Square – 7th February 2020

Paddington Square is a new development springing up to the East of Paddington station.

This Google Map shows the location between the station and St. Mary’s Hospital.

The development will include the following.

  • A Twenty-storey tower.
  • Offices
  • Four floors of upmarket shops
  • A rooftop restaurant.
  • A new public square
  • A new entry into the Bakerloo Line, which will have a step-free connection to Crossrail.

It will certainly improve, what is rather a grotty area of Central London.

There is nothing much to see at the moment.

It’s just a big hole, which is surrounded by hoardings.

February 8, 2020 Posted by | Uncategorized | , | Leave a comment

Oxbourne House Is A Mixed-Use Retail And Residential Project Located On Europe’s Busiest Shopping Street

The title of this post is the same as that of this article on the Fletcher Priest web site.

This is the introductory paragraph.

The project includes high quality apartments and a prominent retail provision, as well as step-free access to Bond Street Underground and Crossrail Station below, where a new street-level station entrance has been constructed off Marylebone Lane.

Note that Fletcher Priest are the architects.

These pictures show the state of the building on December 29th, 2019.

This Google Map shows the location along Oxford Street.

Note.

  1. Oxbourne House is the building along Oxford street with the ribbed structure on its Western end.
  2. The pedestrianised Marylebone Lane, at the Eastern end of Oxbourne House,  running down towards Oxford Street.
  3. The recently built entrance to Bond Street station is hidden by Oxbourne House.
  4. The Radisson Blu Edwardian Berkshire hotel on the other side of Marylebone Lane.

This second Google Map shows the wider picture.

Note.

  1. Marylebone Lane and the Radisson Blu hotel are to the left of this map.
  2. Cavendish Square is in the North-East corner of the map.
  3. Debenhams, House of Fraser, John Lewis are in a line to the East of the entrance.

It looks to be a well-placed entrance.

It Gives Rear Entry To The Department Stores 

Will travellers for Debenhams, House of Fraser, John Lewis and Cavendish Square use the pedestrianised Marylebone Lane and Henrietta Place route, in preference to the crowded route along Oxford Street?

Perhaps if Henrietta Place were to be pedestrianised as well and the signage was clear, many savvy duck-and-divers may be tempted!

I describe the current walking route in Walking From Cavendish Square To The Marylebone Lane Entrance Of Bond Street Station.

Access To Harley Street

The Marylebone Lane/Henrietta Place route gives good access to Harley Street and all its consultants, clinics and facilities.

If as I suspect the route were to be pedestrianised or at least had the kerbs removed,, as the Marylebone Lane entrance to Bond Street station has step-free access to all platforms, Harley Street would have better step-free access to public transport, than many hospitals.

Access To The New Cavendish Square Development

This proposed Cavendish Square Development seems to be mainly upmarket shops and medical facilities like consulting rooms and probably expensive diagnostic equipment.

The access from Bond Street station will be better than to Harley Street.

  • the route will be built step-free.
  • There might only be one road to cross at most.
  • It will be shorter.
  • As an aside, I suspect taxis will be able to drop and collect visitors from inside the development.

I wonder how many consultants will move from Harley Street to the Cavendish Square development.

Conclusion

The new Marylebone Lane entrance to Bond Street station, gives step-free access to an area to the North of Oxford Street

The new entrance also acts as the foundation for Oxbourne House, whose development probably contributed to the creation of the new step-free entrance.

 

December 29, 2019 Posted by | Health, Transport | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Thoughts On Step-Free Access At Oxford Circus Station

The London Underground station most in need of step-free access is probably Oxford Circus, where the Bakerloo and Victoria Lines have a cross-platform step-free interchange, which connects to the Central Line.

  • Oxford Circus is the third-busiest station on the Underground.
  • The capacity of the station probably limits the capacity of the Victoria Line.

This map from carto.metro.free.fr, shows the lines through the station.

Note.

  1. The cross-platform interchange between the Bakerloo and Victoria Lines
  2. The Central Line running East-West under Oxford Street.
  3. Crossrail is shown by dotted lines, passing to the South of the station..

South of the Central Line, it would probably be difficult to squeeze in lifts and more escalators, but to the North, there may be space for another entrance building.

  • The great advantage of making either the Victoria or Bakerloo Lines at Oxford Circus step-free, is that the other one will get it as well.
  • I think it will probably depend on which of the buildings in the area, need to be replaced.
  • I also suspect that the areas under Oxford Circus, Oxford Street and Regent Street are well surveyed, as there has been continuous development of Oxford Circus station since the 1960s.

On the other hand, the opening of Crossrail, with a new entrance to Bond Street station in Hanover Square, may mean that passenger numbers reduce at Oxford Circus, thus allowing a simpler solution.

I wouldn’t be surprised to see a very innovative solution to provide step-free access at Oxford Circus station.

I feel that the Proposed Shopping Centre Under Cavendish Square could be the elephant in the room.

  • An upmarket shopping centre and medical centre needs good access for taxis, cars and public transport.
  • Cavendish Square was used to build the Victoria Line.
  • Tunnelling techniques have improved since the 1960s.

This Google Map shows Cavendish Square and the area between the square and Oxford Circus station.

Consider the four corners of the map..

  • Oxford Circus station is in the South-East corner.
  • Harley Street is just on the map at the North-West corner.
  • The BBC is just off the map in the North-East corner.
  • John Lewis’s flagship store occupies the South-West corner.

But perhaps the most interesting building is the former BHS flagship store, that lies to the East of John Lewis, with Cavendish Square to the North and Oxford Street to the South.

The proposed development under Cavendish Square will be upmarket and it will need high quality access to attract tenants, visitors and clients.

  • I doubt there will be masses of car parking, although they could probably dig up to a hundred metres below the square. Could there be an automatic car park, where vehicles are taken and stacked deep underground?
  • Good access for taxis, private hire vehicles and delivery trucks will be needed..I suspect that planning permission, would specify electric vehicles only.
  • The Bond Street station complex, with Crossrail, Central and Jubilee Lines is perhaps two hundred metres away. I feel the developers of Cavendish Square, will see access to Crossrail as being essential.
  • Oxford Street station is closer, but good access will be needed between the station and Cavendish Square.

Access to Bond Street and Oxford Circus stations would probably be via wide, deep tunnels with travelators as are being installed to solve the horrendous access problems at Bank station.

The former BHS building could be key in any design.

  • The BHS building has a superb location.
  • Tunnels between the two stations and the Cavendish Square complex could go via any development of the BHS building.
  • It might be possible to go higher on the site.
  • It might even be possible to put another station on the Central Line in the basement.

There is certainly a lot of scope for an innovative solution at Oxford Circus station.

December 29, 2019 Posted by | Transport | , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Galliard Homes To Develop £140m Luxury Flat Complex Above Crossrail Station

The title of this post is the same as that of this article on City AM.

This is yet another Crossrail related development.

November 13, 2019 Posted by | Transport, World | , , | Leave a comment

One Liverpool Street: City Of London Approves Crossrail Entrance Office Block

The title of this post is the same as that as this article on City AM.

This paragraph describes the financial structure of the development.

One Liverpool Street will be run by asset managers Aviva Investors, through a joint venture with Transport for London (TfL), and will replace an existing six-storey office block.

It is yet another development along the Crossrail route.

November 13, 2019 Posted by | Transport, World | , , | Leave a comment

Full Steam Ahead For Eric Parry’s Crossrail Scheme

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Building Design.

These points are made in the introduction.

  • Plans for a nine-storey Eric Parry scheme above a Crossrail station in the City of London have taken a significant step forward.
  • Transport for London inked a deal with Aviva for the overstation development at Liverpool Street station.
  • It is one of 12 developments TfL is planning above and around Crossrail sites.

It illustrates how Crossrail is leading to a vast amount of development along the route.

How many cities in the UK and around the world, could benefit from their own cross-city rail line?

Aberdeen, Birmingham, Cardiff, Edinburgh, Glasgow, Leeds, Liverpool and Newcastle have them of various standards, but in some cities getting across the city is a nightmare on public transport and people drive.

 

September 28, 2019 Posted by | Transport | , | Leave a comment

Farringdon Station – 3rd September 2019

These pictures show the Barbican station end of the Crossrail entrance at Farringdon station.

I showed this entrance in Farringdon Station – 7th July 2018.

September 3, 2019 Posted by | Transport | , , | 2 Comments