The Anonymous Widower

A Design Crime – The Average Smoke Detector

On Saturday Evening, the smoke detector in my bedroom decided to go off.

I was able to silence it about three times, but it refused to go off permanently.

I then decided to take it down, by standing on the bed.

Unfortunately, I slipped and broke the detector.

It is not the first altercation, I have had with the cheap and nasty smoke detectors in this house, which were probably bought in Istanbul market for a few pence.

  • In my view, there is a need for a superior type of smoke detector wired into a building in a better way.
  • It should be possible to replace a failed detector, like I had on Saturday in a simple operation without any tools.
  • There should also be a master switch in the house, that switches off all the smoke detectors.
  • Instructions on how to deal with the smoke detectors in case of failure should be in an obvious place in the house, like on the door of the meter cupboard.

Smoke detectors are too important, to be designed down to the cheapest possible station and most are a true design crime.

March 31, 2020 Posted by | World | , , , , , | 4 Comments

Marks And Spencer In Dalston Was On The Ball

This morning, I walked to Marks and Spencer in the Kingsland Road for essential supplies.

I got more than I needed and now have enough food in the fridge and my cupboards for the next ten days.

The hold-up in the store were the tills, but one of the assistants had taken control of the situation, by marshalling customers to spare self-service tills, scanning goods and helping to get the customers out of the store as fast as possible.

It was real East End spirit in action.

Remember that the BBC soap, was nearly shot in a real square close to Dalston and in some ways the chivvying and banter could have been transposed.

Is EastEnders dealing with COVID-19? I doubt it!

March 31, 2020 Posted by | Health, World | , , | 4 Comments

This Is My Second Lockdown

I can’t be the only person, but in the 1970s, I has locked myself away for nearly a year before. I did it to write the first version of the Project Management software; Artemis.

There are some differences between my situation then and my situation now.

  • My wife was alive then and we saw each other for perhaps two days a week.
  • I could drive and I occasionally went down the Clopton Crown for the odd pint and meal!
  • I hadn’t been diagnosed as a coeliac, as that happened in 1997.
  • There was no Internet or social media.
  • There was no Radio 5 Live.
  • I am a better cook now, than I was then.
  • I am within walking distance of a Marks and Spencer Simply Food store.

I think the rules for surviving are as follows.

  • Eat and drink enough.
  • Have entertaining radio or television on.
  • Break the day up with a bit of exercise.
  • Get a good night’s sleep.
  • Arrange good weather.

Let’s hope this lockdown turns out as well as the last.

March 31, 2020 Posted by | Computing, Health, World | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Our Social Distancing Is Working, Says Sir Patrick Vallance

This is a headline on the front of today’s Times.

Sir Patrick is the government’s chief scientific adviser and I doubt he would use words like that lightly.

He noted these points.

  • Hospital admissions are increasing by a stable amount each day.
  • The NHS is coping as numbers have stopped accelerating.
  • He felt that reductions in travel were working.
  • Public transport usage has severely reduced.

He indicated that more of the same was needed.

I wouldn’t be surprised to see that by the end of this week, we’ll be able to make much better predictions on the progress of the COVID-19 virus through the UK population.

Here in the UK, we could be approaching the End of the Beginning!

 

 

March 31, 2020 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Proudly South African Hydrogen Breakthrough With Shell’s Backing

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Creamer Media’s Mining Weekly.

This is the introductory paragraph.

At this time of huge coronavirus uncertainty, the chests of a group of engineers here must surely be bulging with pride following their major Proudly South African world breakthrough that could speed up the global deployment of hydrogen as a competitive universal and environment-friendly energy carrier.

I think it got a bit jumbled in the typing.

Reading the article it does seem that various developments are coming together in South Africa.

  • A much simple electrolyser to produce hydrogen.
  • South Africa’s platinum for catalysts.
  • Large amounts of renewable energy.

The aim is to produce hydrogen at a comparable price with petrol.

This paragraph stands out.

South Africa has the combined solar and wind potential to produce competitive hydrogen, which can meet the world’s new environmental requirements.

The article talks about exporting hydrogen to Japan.

Conclusion

South Africa is a country that needs all the good news it can get.

This looks like it could be some of the best.

But how many other hot countries can take advantage of what looks like a breakthrough in the electrolysis of water to produce hydrogen for a fuel?

March 31, 2020 Posted by | World | , , , | 2 Comments

Testing Of Greater Anglia’s New Electric Trains Continues Amid Coronavirus Outbreak

The title of this post is the same as that of this article on itv.com.

These are the first paragraphs of the report.

Greater Anglia is continuing to test it’s new electric trains amid the coronavirus outbreak.

The company says they are following all government guidelines to ensure that the workforce is kept as safe as possible.

One of the new electric trains completed its maiden voyage to Liverpool Street recently – a journey the company says was a success.

Hopefully, the testing program won’t be delayed too long.

March 31, 2020 Posted by | Transport | , , | Leave a comment