The Anonymous Widower

Can The UK Have A Capacity To Create Five GW Of Green Hydrogen

This article in The Times today is entitled Net Zero By 2050: Bold Aims Are An Example To Other Nations.

It is an analysis of the Government’s plans for a greener future.

This is a paragraph.

Only a few small-scale green hydrogen plants exist globally, and so five gigawatts of low-carbon hydrogen generation by 2030 is a bold commitment. For context, BP recently announced that it was building its first full-scale green hydrogen facility, in Germany — with a 50-megawatt capacity.

I don’t think from the tone, that the writer thinks it is possible.

Onn the other hand I do believe it is possible.

ITM Power

ITM Power are the experts in electrolysis and have the largest electrolyser factory in the world, which is capable of supplying 1 GW of electrolyser capacity per annum.

It would appear they can supply the required five GW of electrolyser capacity in time for 2030.

The Herne Bay Electrolyser

Ryse Hydrogen are building the Herne Bay electrolyser.

  • It will consume 23 MW of solar and wind power.
  • It will produce ten tonnes of hydrogen per day.
  • The hydrogen it produces will be mainly for hydrogen buses in London.
  • Delivery of the hydrogen will be by truck.

To produce five gigawatts of hydrogen would require nearly 220 electrolysers the size of Herne Bay.

ITM Power and Ørsted: Wind Turbine Electrolyser Integration

But ITM Power are working on a project with Ørsted , where wind turbines and hydrogen electrolysers are co-located, at sea to produce the hydrogen offshore.

ITM Power talks about the project in this press release on their web site.

This is the introductory paragraph.

ITM Power, the energy storage and clean fuel company, is pleased to share details of a short project sponsored by the Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy (BEIS), in late 2019, entitled ‘Hydrogen supply competition’, ITM Power and Ørsted proposed the following: an electrolyser placed at the wind turbine e.g. in the tower or very near it, directly electrically connected to the DC link in the wind turbine, with appropriate power flow control and water supplied to it. This may represent a better design concept for bulk hydrogen production as opposed to, for instance, remotely located electrolysers at a terminal or platform, away from the wind turbine generator, due to reduced costs and energy losses.

The proposed concept is also described.

  • A marine environment capable electrolyser
  • ‘Type IV’ wind turbine generators and their ‘DC link’ have the potential to power the electrolyser directly
  • This enables fewer power conversion steps and thereby reduces both energy losses and electrolyser footprint
  •  Readily abundant cooling capacity via the sea water
  •  Energy in the form of Hydrogen gas supplied to shore by pipe rather than via electricity
  •  Connecting one electrolyser with one turbine wind generator
  •  Other avoided costs of this concept include permitting, a single process unit deployment

Note.

  1. I can’t find a Type IV wind turbine generator, but the largest that Ørsted have installed are about 8 MW.
  2. This size would require 750 turbines to provide the UK’s five gigawatts of hydrogen.
  3. 12 MW turbines are under development.

The Hornsea wind farm is being developed by Ørsted

  • Hornsea 1 has a capacity of 1.2 GW and was completed in 2020.
  • Hornsea 2 will have a capacity of 1.8 GW and will be completed in 2022.
  • Hornsea 3 will have a capacity of 2.4 GW and will be completed in 2025.
  • Hornsea 4 will have a yet-to-be-determined capacity and could be completed in 2027.

This wind farm will probably supply over 6 GW on its own, when the wind is blowing.

Bringing The Hydrogen Ashore

This has been done since the 1960s in UK waters and it will be very traditional projects for the UK’s engineers.

  • Some of the existing pipes could be repurposed.
  • Worked out gas fields could probably be used to store the hydrogen or carbon dioxide captured from gas- or coal-fired power stations.

I’m fairly sure that by the use of valves and clever control systems, the pipes linking everything together could be used by different gases.

Conclusion

Producing 5 GW of green hydrogen per year by 2030 is possible.

 

 

November 19, 2020 Posted by | Hydrogen | , , , , | 6 Comments

Ireland’s First Green Hydrogen Project To Come On Stream ‘In Weeks’

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on the Irish Times.

This is the first two paragraphs.

Belfast is set to receive Ireland’s first hydrogen-powered double-decker buses in coming weeks using fuel coming from wind energy generated in nearby north Antrim.

The initiative is the first “green hydrogen” project on the island of Ireland and the first step to decarbonise Northern Ireland’s public transport by 2040, according to Mark Welsh, energy services manager with Energia, which is generating the hydrogen at its wind farm near Ballymena.

Green hydrogen is produced by an electrolyser powered by renewable electricity.

The article gives a good summary of the use of hydrogen in Ireland in the future.

But isn’t all hydrogen created and used on the island of Ireland green?

November 4, 2020 Posted by | Energy, Hydrogen, Transport | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Green Hydrogen For Scotland

The title of this post, has been taken from this press release from ITM Power, which is entitled ‘Green Hydrogen For Scotland’ To Help Reach Net Zero Targets: First Project To Deliver A 10MW Electrolyser To Glasgow Facility.

This is the introductory paragraph.

A pioneering Strategic partnership has been established to create new green hydrogen production facilities with clusters of refuelling stations across Scotland, supporting the country’s efforts to achieve net zero by 2045. ‘Green Hydrogen for Scotland’ – a partnership of ScottishPower Renewables, BOC (a Linde company) and ITM Power – brings together industry-leading names in the renewables and clean fuel industries to offer an end-to-end market solution for reducing vehicle emissions through the provision of green hydrogen.

Other details include.

  • The green hydrogen production facility located on the outskirts of Glasgow will be operated by BOC.
  • ITM Power will deliver a 10 MW electrolyser.
  • Electricity will come from , wind and solar produced by ScottishPower Renewables.
  • The project aims to supply hydrogen to the commercial market within the next two years.

This ITM Power infographic outlines Green Hydrogen for Scotland.

Surely it should be called tartan hydrogen. Does anybody know a tartan containing the blue of Scotland, the white of Yorkshire and the black, red and gold of Germany?

September 16, 2020 Posted by | Energy, Hydrogen, Transport | , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Solar To Hydrogen Efficiency Record Broken By Australian National University Researchers

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Hydrogen Fuel News.

The traditional route to produce green hydrogen from solar panels, is to create electricity and then use electrolysis to create the hydrogen.

This process goes direct and an improvement in efficiency of 17.6 %.

August 13, 2020 Posted by | Energy, Hydrogen | , , , | Leave a comment

Ryse Hydrogen Wants To Make The North East Of Scotland A World Leader In Hydrogen

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on H2 View.

This is the introductory paragraph.

Ryse Hydrogen has pledged to work with the Scottish Government and local authorities to make the North East of Scotland a world leader in hydrogen.

I think this is both a laudable and a very sensible aim.

  • Large offshore wind farms are being built both around Aberdeen and the Far North of Scotland.
  • Production of hydrogen is a sensible way to use spare renewable electricity.
  • That area of Scotland is not short of wind.
  • Aberdeen will be taking delivery of hydrogen buses later this year.
  • With their experience of the oil industry, there would not be a shortage of people with the necessary expertise.

The article also details Jo Bamford’s plans for hydrogen buses.

June 13, 2020 Posted by | Transport, World | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Gas Network Operators And Energy Suppliers Urge Government To Promote Hydrogen-Fueled Recovery

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Business Green.

This is the introductory paragraph.

In a letter to Chancellor Rishi Sunak, Siemens Energy, Engie, National Grid, and Ryse Hydrogen call for the government to emulate its successful approach to offshore wind development and set an official cost reduction target for green hydrogen.

I think they’re right.

There has also been lots of comment in recent days on The Times web site arguing for more hydrogen.

Points from the Business Green article include.

  • Develop a policy  for carbon capture, usage and storage (CCUS), that was promised in its manifesto.
  • Carbon capture and storage would allow the production of zero-carbon blue hydrogen from natural gas.
  • The signatories have £900 million ready to invest in a zero-carbon gas grid in the UK.
  • Plans will be unveiled before the COP26 conference.
  • More emphasis by government on hydrogen buses and HGVs is needed.

The government and the gas industry must work together to deliver an economy, that is as near to zero-carbon as possible.

 

June 12, 2020 Posted by | Transport, World | , , , , , | 1 Comment

A Trading Update From ITM Power

ITM Power issued a Press Release entitled Trading Update, this morning.

It is a document, that is a must-read about the future of hydrogen.

There are some interesting statements on various topics.

The Future Of Hydrogen Production

The Press Release says this.

Alongside the predicted growth trajectory for electrolysis, the cost outlook for green hydrogen is also positive. The Hydrogen Council expects green hydrogen to become cost competitive with grey hydrogen by 2025 assuming a €50 per ton CO2 price.  An 80GW electrolyser target for Europe by 2030 has been proposed, where electrolysers feed into a hydrogen transmission network that interconnects the renewable energy resources of the North Sea, Morocco and Ukraine with the demand centres of Europe.  Further afield, Australia is actively pursuing opportunities to export green hydrogen and has estimated that 69 per cent of the 2025 global market for hydrogen will lie in its four target markets of China, Japan, Korea and Singapore.

Note.

  1. Green hydrogen is produced by a zero-carbon process like electrolysis using renewable electricity.
  2. Grey hydrogen is produced by a process that releases carbon-dioxide like steam reforming of methane.

It looks like green hydrogen will be the future.

Governments And Green Hydrogen

The Press Release says this.

Governments are increasingly recognising the role of green hydrogen as a decarbonisation tool.  The U.K. government has introduced an overarching net zero target and placed an early focus on decarbonising industrial clusters that will lead to progressively larger deployments of electrolysers. In the Netherlands, the Dutch government has recently presented its green hydrogen vision for achieving a sustainable energy system that is reliable, clean and affordable.  A total of three European governments have now stated explicit electrolyser targets for 2030: Germany 5GW, Holland 3-4GW and Portugal 2GW.

It looks like a lot of electrolysers will be built.

The Germans And Hydrogen

The Press Release says this.

The German government announced in its stimulus package of 3 June 2020 that it will present a national hydrogen strategy in the short term. Accordingly, a programme for the development of hydrogen production plants will be developed to demonstrate industrial-scale production of up to 5GW total output in Germany, operational by 2030. For the period up to 2035, but until 2040 at the latest, an additional 5 GW will be added if possible. To implement all these measures, the German government will invest €7bn.

Not only is hydrogen zero-carbon, it also means they will buy less of Putin’s gas.

Conclusion

Hydrogen has a very long term future.

June 8, 2020 Posted by | World | , , , , , | 1 Comment

Hydrogen Gas From Biogas

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Finance News Network.

This is the introductory paragraph.

Managing Director and CEO Geoff Ward talks about the Hazer process for low emissions hydrogen gas and high purity graphite production from biogas, CAPEX approval to proceed with the company’s commercial demonstration plant and offtake discussions.

The process doesn’t create any CO2, as it extracts the carbon as a crystalline graphite. So are there two worthwhile products from the biogas?

According to this page on Graphene Info, the graphite can be made to create graphene.

May 27, 2020 Posted by | World | , , , | Leave a comment

‘World First’: SGN Launches Bid For 300 Green Hydrogen Homes Project In Fife

This title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Business Green.

This is the introductory paragraph.

Around 300 homes in Scotland could soon have their heating and cooking powered by green hydrogen produced from renewable electricity under proposals for “the world’s first green hydrogen-to-homes network” unveiled today by SGN.

A few points from the article.

  • Construction could start in the winter of 2020/21.
  • The project will take two or three years.
  • The modified houses appear to be in Levenmouth.
  • The project has been dubbed H100 Fife.
  • The hydrogen will be produced by electrolysis using electricity generated by offshore wind.

The article also gives a round-up of the state of hydrogen in the UK.

Could This Have Other Implications For Levenmouth?

In Scottish Government Approve £75m Levenmouth Rail Link, I discussed the rebuilding of the Levenmouth Rail Link.

I suggested that the route could be run by Hitachi Class 385 trains with batteries, which Hitachi have stated are being developed. I covered the trains in more detail in Hitachi Plans To Run ScotRail Class 385 EMUs Beyond The Wires.

If there were to be a source of hydrogen at Levenmouth, could hydrogen-powered trains be used on the route?

The Levenmouth Rail link could be a prototype for other short rail links in Scotland.

 

In

 

 

May 21, 2020 Posted by | Transport, World | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Highview Power Keeping Up Momentum

The title of this post is the same as that of this article on Gas World.

This is the introductory paragraph.

It’s full steam ahead for Highview Power as the energy storage provider’s CEO and President today updated on operations.

It does look thatHighview are optimistic since their partnership with Sumitomo Heavy Industries was announced, that I wrote about in Japanese Giant Sumitomo Heavy Invests In Liquid-Air Energy Storage Pioneer.

I am optimistic too!

  • Highview’s system uses no difficult technology or rare materials.
  • The system can provide large amounts of storage, which we are going to need with all the wind farms we are developing.
  • From my Control Engineering and mathematical modelling experience, I believe, these systems can be used to boost power, where it is needed, in the same way gas-fired power stations do.

But above all, Highview Power has created a standalone energy storage system for the Twenty-First Century, that catches the needs and moods of the Age!

Our energy system is changing and it not expressed any better, than in this article on Physics World, which is entitled Does The UK Need 40 GW Of Firm Capacity?

This is the opening sentence.

Whether it comes from nuclear plants or fossil fuel-fired power stations with carbon capture and storage (CCS), the UK will need 30-40 GW of new “firm” low-carbon baseload generation by 2050 to meet the net-zero emissions target, Greg Clark reportedly said.

I don’t think that the country will allow any Government of the UK to build that much nuclear capacity and I have my doubts about the feasibility of large scale CCS. I also don’t think, the public will allow the building of large coal-fired power stations, even with CCS. And they don’t like nuclear either!

On Wikipedia, Wind Power in the UK, says this about the current Round 3 of proposals for wind farms.

Following on from the Offshore wind SEA announced by the Government in December 2007, the Crown Estate launched a third round of site allocations in June 2008. Following the success of Rounds 1 and 2, and important lessons were learnt – Round 3 was on a much bigger scale than either of its predecessors combined (Rounds 1 and 2 allocated 8 GW of sites, while Round 3 alone could identify up to 25 GW).

If you think UK politics is a lot of wind and bluster, that is pussy-cat’s behaviour compared to the roaring lions around our shores.

Wikipedia then lists nine fields, with a total power of 26.7 GW, but some are not being built because of planning.

But we ain’t seen noting yet!

Wikipedia says this about Round 4.

Round 4 was announced in 2019 and represented the first large scale new leasing round in a decade. This offers the opportunity for up to 7GW of new offshore capacity to be developed in the waters around England and Wales.

The Agreements for Lease will be announced in 2021.

Wikipedia then makes these points.

  • Nuclear power stations have funding and technical problems.
  • Since the Fukushima nuclear disaster public support for new nuclear has fallen
  • The UK government increased its previous commitment for 40 GW of Offshore wind capacity by 2030, in the Queen’s Speech in December 2019.
  • In 2020, this represents a 355% increase in ten years.
  • It is expected the Crown Estate will announce multiple new leasing Rounds and increases to existing bidding areas throughout the 2020-2030 period to achieve the governments aim of 40 GW.
  • The Scottish Government has plans to chip in 6 GW.

I will add these feelings of my own

  • I have ignored the contribution, that better wind-power technology will make to get more GW for each billion pounds of investment.
  • I can see a day, in the not too distant future, when on a day in the summer, no electricity in the UK comes from fossil fuel.
  • There will be a merging between wind power and hydrogen generation, as I described in ITM Power and Ørsted: Wind Turbine Electrolyser Integration.
  • Traditional nuclear is dead, although there may be applications for small nuclear reactors in the future.
  • In parallel to the growth of wind power, there will be a massive growth of solar power.

But we will need to store some of this energy for times when the wind isn’t blowing and the sun isn’t shining.

  • Pumped storage hydroelectric schemes, as at Electric Mountain in Snowdonia may have a part to play as I described in The New Generation Of Pumped Storage Systems. But sadly, the UK doesn’t have the terrain for another 9.1 GWh scheme.
  • A lot of electricity will be converted to hydrogen to power industrial processes and augment and possibly replace natural gas in the UK’s gas network.
  • Some electricity will be stored in batteries in houses and vehicles, when it is most affordable and used, when it is more expensive.
  • Companies and funds, like Gresham House Energy Storage Fund will fund and build storage facilities around the UK.
  • Traditional lithium-ion batteries require a lot of expensive raw materials controlled by the Chinese!
  • But if we develop all these options, and generate tens of GWs using renewables, the UK will still need a substantial amount of GW-scale affordable energy storage systems.

It is my belief, that Highview Power is the only practical GW-scale affordable energy storage system.

My only worry about their system, is that the idea could be ripped off, by an unscrupulous country with a solid process plant industry!

 

 

 

May 2, 2020 Posted by | Energy, Energy Storage | , , , , , | 1 Comment