The Anonymous Widower

I Don’t Generally Take Pain Killers

I have taken pain killers rarely in my life, but only when I get serious pain.

But since the cataract operation, I have felt a bit of light pain in my left eye.

So I’ve resorted to taking three of these large pain-killers.

Usually, I dunk them in cup of tea.

I’ve always liked ginger and they have been my favourite biscuits since I was about six.

I also used to see a Jamaican nurse in a former GP practice for my B12 injections and she was fulsome in her praise for the spice and what it can do.

Dr. Google also finds evidence that they help.

However, who cares, so long as I think they work.

December 29, 2021 Posted by | Food, Health | , , , , , | 1 Comment

Wandering Around King’s Cross – 20th December 2021

I took these pictures, whilst I wandered around King’s Cross.

The unfinished building is Google’s large groundscraper.

I took these pictures as I wandered.

King’s Cross is on the up.

December 29, 2021 Posted by | World | , , | 1 Comment

Green Trains On Their Way To Power One Of The World’s Most Abundant Mining Regions

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on the Australian Broadcasting Corporation.

It is a comprehensive article, with maps, pictures and background information about the project I wrote about in Anglo American And Aurizon Look To Hydrogen-Powered Trains, that will create hydrogen-powered freight locomotives for Australia.

It should be noted that Aurizon operates a few hundred diesel-electric locomotives, so switching to hydrogen, would probably cut a lot of carbon emissions.

December 29, 2021 Posted by | Hydrogen, Transport/Travel, World | , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Old Hackney Town Hall

These pictures show the Old Hackney Town Hall.

It is now a pub and Grade II Listed.

Behind the building is the Grade I Listed St.Augustine’s Tower, which is all that remains of the 16th Century parish church of St. Augustine.

December 29, 2021 Posted by | World | , , , | 4 Comments

Hackney Central Station New Entrance – 24th December 2021

The new entrance at Hackney Central station is moving on.

Parts of the structure can now be seen behind the hoardings.

This picture shows the new entrance from Graham Road.

And this picture shows the entrance from above.

It does not look like step-free access is provided, but I suspect it could be added later.

Strangely, although Hackney Central station is to the East of where I live on the other side of Dalston Junction, it will be on a route, I might take, when I want to go West on the North London Line. I would just take a 38 bus direct to this entrance and then take a train to Richmond or Clapham Junction station as appropriate.

If Hackney Council put a light-controlled crossing over Graham Road, this will make it easy for me to come home from Stratford.

December 29, 2021 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , | Leave a comment

Walking The Line

A friend asked, if I’d like to accompany her on a walk along the tunnels of the Post Office Railway.

I said yes, went along and took these pictures.

Note.

  1. The tracks are only two-foot gauge.
  2. The trains were driverless and electrically powered.
  3. The two modern trains with the plastic roofs; one of which is red and the other green, are used to take Postal Museum visitors along the tunnels.
  4. The yellow train was painted that colour for its part in the Bruce Willis film; Hudson Hawk.
  5. A large number of the sleepers had plaques on them, indicating their sponsors. The sleeps looked to be nearly all original.
  6. The paintings on the wall show the Twelve Days of Christmas and date from when Christmas parties for children were held in the tunnels.
  7. The tunnels were dug by hand using a Greathead Shield.
  8. There was no evidence of rodents.

It is a unique railway that is well worth a visit.

A few other facts and thoughts.

New Tunnels

Most modern tunnels like Crossrail, High Speed Two and the Thames Tideway are now dug by tunnel boring machines or TBMs. These pictures show Millicent and Ursula preparing to start boring the Thames Tideway.

Not all tunnels though use a TBM. Recently, the new running tunnel at Bank and pedestrian tunnels at Paddington and possibly Moorgate have been dug in the traditional way, but probably with the aid of some of the likes of JCB’s finest.

There was also the innovative way, that Whitechapel station was built, that I described in Coal Mining in Whitechapel.

Tunnel Life Research

This is a paragraph from the Wikipedia entry for the Post Office Railway.

A team from the University of Cambridge has taken over a short, double track section of unused Post Office tunnel near Liverpool Street Station, where a newly built tunnel for Crossrail is situated some two metres beneath. The study is to establish how the original cast-iron lining sections, which are similar to those used for many miles of railway under London, resist possible deformation and soil movement caused by the new works. Digital cameras, fibre optic deformation sensors, laser scanners and other low-cost instruments, reporting in real time, have been installed in the vacated tunnel. As well as providing information about the behaviour of the old construction materials, the scheme can also provide an early warning if the new tunnel bores are creating dangerous soil movement

This is worthwhile research, as there have been some problems with London’s older tunnels.

Building The Paddington Bakerloo Line Link Project

This was done in and around the Paddington end of the Post Office Railway.

There is a link to a professional presentation about this complex project in Paddington Bakerloo Line Link Project, London.

Royal Mail Group assets at Paddington helped in the comstruction of the link.

December 29, 2021 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , , | 2 Comments