The Anonymous Widower

Delivering Hydrogen For Vehicles

In Friday’s copy of The Times, there is an article entitled Hydrogen Lifts Off: An Old Fuel Showing New Promise.

The article talks about Shell’s plans to create a network of filling stations for hydrogen-powered vehicles.

This is a paragraph.

A potential alternative is electrolysis, the method that Shell’s partner ITM Power is using to produce hydrogen at the Gatwick site. There, in a yard behind the refuelling pump, temporary buildings house equipment that purify tap water and convert AC electricity from the grid to DC current. This is used to split the water through electrolysis into hydrogen and harmless waste oxygen, which is vented out.

Note.

  1. Electrolysis is an alternative to the use of steam reforming of methane, which produces a lot of carbon dioxide.
  2. If the electricity is from renewables like solar, wind or tidal, then the hydrogen produced can be considered green.
  3. They is also a quote from Shell, which says that as renewable power gets cheaper and electrolysis more efficient, this will be the standard way to produce hydrogen.

It does seem to me that we could see hydrogen stations all over the place, as each is stand-alone and only needs tap water, an electricity feed and customers.

Who is iTM Power?

iTM Power are a company based in Sheffield.

Read more about them on their Wikipedia entry or their web site.

They claim to have the world’s largest PEM electrolyser factory.

They are also developing a network of hydrogen filling stations.

Currently opened include.

  • Beaconsfield Services Hydrogen Station
  • Gatwick Refuelling Station
  • Rainham Solar Hydrogen Station, Essex
  • Rotherham Wind Hydrogen Station
  • Shell Cobham Services Hydrogen Station
  • Swindon Hydrogen Station
  • Teddington Hydrogen Station

And these are currently planned.

  • Birmingham Bus
  • Birmingham Passenger Vehicle
  • Pau Bus, France

Note.

  1. Some as you can see are to support hydrogen buses.
  2. Some are powered directly by renewable electricity.
  3. Birmingham’s two stations are co-located.
  4. Two; Beaconsfield and Cobham are at motorway service areas.
  5. Pau is probably  to support the hydrogen-powered busway that is being created in the town. There is more on that in this article on rfi, which is entitled Amid Transport Chaos, France Rolls Out World-First Hydrogen Bus Fleet.

It’s looks to me that iTM are working to a sensible plan.

  • They can supply a system for a range of purposes.
  • They can be placed on fairly small sites.
  • They don’t need connection to a hydrogen grid.
  • Is it sensible to put one in for a fleet of buses, trucks or vans first?
  • Systems for buses and other vehicles can be co-located.

I can see in a few years, that everyone will be within sensible reach of a hydrogen filling station.

As the range of a hydrogen-powered car is in the hundreds of miles. it looks to me that the range anxiety of battery vehicles will be overcome.

I don’t drive or have a car, but if I needed one, I’d buy hydrogen over battery, when there was a filling station in my part of London.

 

January 19, 2020 Posted by | Transport | , , , | 5 Comments

The New Warrington West Station

These pictures show the new Warrington West station.

The station looks to have a similar layout to Maghull North station, which I described in Maghull North Station – 29th June 2018.

The two stations have a lot in common.

  • The cutting and the contours of the land are used to create a simpler station.
  • Provision for car-parking.
  • Links to the bus network.
  • Enough car-parking. Warrington West has 387 spaces, with 156 spaces at Maghull North.
  • Fully step-free.
  • A separate amenity building, with a booking office, waiting area and toilets.

Surprisingly, the two stations were designed by different architectural practices.

The Major Problem

The major problem is that Warrington West station only has two trains per hour (tph), in the Off Peak.

  • The route connects Liverpool Lime Street to Manchester Airport and Manchester Oxford Road stations alternately.
  • Manchester Airport services also call at Manchester Piccadilly station.
  • All services call at Deansgate station for the Manchester Metrolink.
  • There are links to Merseyrail’s Wirral Line at Liverpool Lime Street.
  • There are links to Merseyrail’s Northern Line at Liverpool South Parkway and Hunts Cross.
  • Liverpool South Parkway, Warrington West and Birchwood stations are already step-free.
  • Hunts Cross, Irlam, and Manchester Oxford Road stations are in the queue for step-free access.
  • Most of the services on Liverpool’s Merseyrail network have four tph.
  • There is a lot of housing and other development on this route,

I’m sure that four tph and full step-free access will be needed on this route before too long.

Possible Electrification

It could be argued that this route between Liverpool Lime Street and Manchester Oxford Road stations, should be fully-electrified.

Currently, just over twenty-eight miles of the route between Manchester Oxford Road and Liverpool South Parkway stations is not electrified.

  • Between Liverpool South Parkway and Liverpool Lime Street stations has 25 KVAC overhead electrification.
  • Between Hunt’s Cross and Liverpool Central station is part of Merseyrail’s Northern Line and has 750 VDC third-rail electrification.
  • Manchester Oxford Road station has 25 KVAC overhead electrification.
  • The bay platform at Manchester Oxford Road station could be electrified or fitted with a fast charging station for battery trains.
  • Battery trains can easily do forty miles after a charge of perhaps ten minutes, as I wrote in Retired London Underground Train Travels Forty Miles Solely On Battery Power.

I think, that the route between Manchester and Liverpool via Warrington is a very suitable route for running using battery-electric trains.

  • It is electrified at both ends.
  • The section without electrification is less than thirty miles.
  • Charging can be performed using the existing electrification or with a charging station at Manchester Oxford Road station.
  • Northern’s Class 331 trains, which are being built by CAF. I suspect that battery-electric versions are possible as CAF have successfully built battery-electric Urbos trams for Luxembourg, Seville and the West Midlands.
  • Merseyrail’s new Class 777 trains, can be converted to battery-electric operation.
  • The route is not busy.
  • There aren’t many freight trains on the route.

Using battery-electric trains would probably cause a lot less disruption, than full electrification of the route.

Possible ways to increase trains on the route include.

  • Merseyrail could extend Northern Line trains from Hunt’s Cross to Manchester Oxford Road.
  • The Manchester Metrolink could even be connected to the route at somewhere near Pomona and run tram-trains to Liverpool.
  • Northern could run battery-electric trains on the route.

There must also be the possibility of running hydrogen-powered trains on the route.

Negotiations between Liverpool and Manchester over who provides the extra services will be tough.

Conclusion

It is a neat new station, that will attract passengers.

The station could be an important link in improved rail services between Liverpool and Manchester via Warrington.

  • This route could probably handle at least six tph in both directions.
  • Would turning back four tph in the bay platform at Manchester Oxford Road station, ease the pressure on the Castlefield corridor.
  • It serves the important stations of Liverpool Lime Street, Liverpool South Parkway, Manchester Oxford Road, Manchester Piccadilly and Manchester Airport.
  • It connects Merseyrail’s to Northern and Wirral Lines and the Manchester Metrolink.
  • An increasing number of stations on the route are step-free.

I suspect too, that it could be an important feeder line for High Speed Two.

 

January 19, 2020 Posted by | Transport | , , , | 1 Comment

How Good Is ‘Freezing Air’ The Solution For Electricity?

The title of this post is the same as that for this article on Energy News 24.

The article discusses Highview Power’s proposed 400 MWh installation in Vermont, where they are installing lots of renewable power sources and need a way to store the energy, which is partly wasted.

Read the article and especially the last sentence.

Vice President Jason Burwen Energy Storage Association said the capacity of the plant would be “on par with today’s largest grid energy storage projects under construction.” He said it would be the equivalent electricity needed “to power maybe 50,000 homes for eight hours.”

Are the British coming?

The Highview Power system to me is a blindingly obvious simple idea, based on proven technology, that has been used for many decades. Add in clever computing technology to control it and blend it with renewable energy and every wind or solar farm, tidal power station and sizeable town or city should have one, where there is a site the size of a football pitch.

January 19, 2020 Posted by | Energy Storage | , , , , | Leave a comment