The Anonymous Widower

The New Warrington West Station

These pictures show the new Warrington West station.

The station looks to have a similar layout to Maghull North station, which I described in Maghull North Station – 29th June 2018.

The two stations have a lot in common.

  • The cutting and the contours of the land are used to create a simpler station.
  • Provision for car-parking.
  • Links to the bus network.
  • Enough car-parking. Warrington West has 387 spaces, with 156 spaces at Maghull North.
  • Fully step-free.
  • A separate amenity building, with a booking office, waiting area and toilets.

Surprisingly, the two stations were designed by different architectural practices.

The Major Problem

The major problem is that Warrington West station only has two trains per hour (tph), in the Off Peak.

  • The route connects Liverpool Lime Street to Manchester Airport and Manchester Oxford Road stations alternately.
  • Manchester Airport services also call at Manchester Piccadilly station.
  • All services call at Deansgate station for the Manchester Metrolink.
  • There are links to Merseyrail’s Wirral Line at Liverpool Lime Street.
  • There are links to Merseyrail’s Northern Line at Liverpool South Parkway and Hunts Cross.
  • Liverpool South Parkway, Warrington West and Birchwood stations are already step-free.
  • Hunts Cross, Irlam, and Manchester Oxford Road stations are in the queue for step-free access.
  • Most of the services on Liverpool’s Merseyrail network have four tph.
  • There is a lot of housing and other development on this route,

I’m sure that four tph and full step-free access will be needed on this route before too long.

Possible Electrification

It could be argued that this route between Liverpool Lime Street and Manchester Oxford Road stations, should be fully-electrified.

Currently, just over twenty-eight miles of the route between Manchester Oxford Road and Liverpool South Parkway stations is not electrified.

  • Between Liverpool South Parkway and Liverpool Lime Street stations has 25 KVAC overhead electrification.
  • Between Hunt’s Cross and Liverpool Central station is part of Merseyrail’s Northern Line and has 750 VDC third-rail electrification.
  • Manchester Oxford Road station has 25 KVAC overhead electrification.
  • The bay platform at Manchester Oxford Road station could be electrified or fitted with a fast charging station for battery trains.
  • Battery trains can easily do forty miles after a charge of perhaps ten minutes, as I wrote in Retired London Underground Train Travels Forty Miles Solely On Battery Power.

I think, that the route between Manchester and Liverpool via Warrington is a very suitable route for running using battery-electric trains.

  • It is electrified at both ends.
  • The section without electrification is less than thirty miles.
  • Charging can be performed using the existing electrification or with a charging station at Manchester Oxford Road station.
  • Northern’s Class 331 trains, which are being built by CAF. I suspect that battery-electric versions are possible as CAF have successfully built battery-electric Urbos trams for Luxembourg, Seville and the West Midlands.
  • Merseyrail’s new Class 777 trains, can be converted to battery-electric operation.
  • The route is not busy.
  • There aren’t many freight trains on the route.

Using battery-electric trains would probably cause a lot less disruption, than full electrification of the route.

Possible ways to increase trains on the route include.

  • Merseyrail could extend Northern Line trains from Hunt’s Cross to Manchester Oxford Road.
  • The Manchester Metrolink could even be connected to the route at somewhere near Pomona and run tram-trains to Liverpool.
  • Northern could run battery-electric trains on the route.

There must also be the possibility of running hydrogen-powered trains on the route.

Negotiations between Liverpool and Manchester over who provides the extra services will be tough.

Conclusion

It is a neat new station, that will attract passengers.

The station could be an important link in improved rail services between Liverpool and Manchester via Warrington.

  • This route could probably handle at least six tph in both directions.
  • Would turning back four tph in the bay platform at Manchester Oxford Road station, ease the pressure on the Castlefield corridor.
  • It serves the important stations of Liverpool Lime Street, Liverpool South Parkway, Manchester Oxford Road, Manchester Piccadilly and Manchester Airport.
  • It connects Merseyrail’s to Northern and Wirral Lines and the Manchester Metrolink.
  • An increasing number of stations on the route are step-free.

I suspect too, that it could be an important feeder line for High Speed Two.

 

January 19, 2020 Posted by | Transport | , , , | 1 Comment

DfT Names Five Winners Of Fresh £16m Stations Fund

The title of this post is the same as an article in Rail Technology Magazine.

It announces the five winners of funding from the Second New Stations Fund.

Stations chosen are as follows.

  • Horden Peterlee in County Durham
  • Warrington West in Cheshire
  • Reading Green Park
  • Bow Street in Ceredigion, Wales
  • Portway Parkway near Bristol

Note the fund is for England and Wales only!

The stations will be described in the next few sections.

Horden Peterlee

Horden Peterlee station will be on the double-track Durham Coast Line, between Seaham and Hsrtlepool stations.

This Google Map shows the area of the proposed station close to South East View.

Wikipedia says this about the proposed station.

This station, if built, would have 2 platforms with waiting shelters, benches, lighting, help points and CCTV. The platforms would be linked by a covered footbridge and the station would have a car park with space for up to 100 cars as well as facilities for drop-off, taxis and bus services.

Let’s hope the lie of the land, enables the architects to design a good station.

Wikipedia also says this as the reason for building the station.

It was identified that one of the key benefits of reopening Horden station rather than any of the other closed stations on the line was its close proximity to Peterlee which has grown significantly since 1964 and thus, if constructed, a new station in Horden could allow 61,000 residents to benefit from improved access to employment opportunities across the region.

It sounds to me like this station is needed. I would hope to go when this station opens, as it could be a day to remember  in Horden.

Train Services

Looking at Passenger Services in the Wikipedia entry for the Durham Coast Line, it would appear that local services between Middlesbrough and Newcastle are a bit thin, at just hourly. An important local route like this deserves to have at least two trains per hour.

Grand Central and Virgin do run trains through the area to Sunderland, but I don’t think they will stop at Horden Peterlee station.

Certainly, a smart new station deserves to have a train service to natch.

Warrington West

Warrington West station will be on the southern Liverpool to Manchester Line between Sankey and Warrington Central stations.

This Google Map shows the area of the station.

It looks like the development site in the South East corner of the map could be Chapelford urban village, with the railway running East-West across the map.

This article in the Warrington Guardian gives more details of the station.

This is a visualisation of the station.

As this station is halfway between Liverpool and Manchester, I have a feeling, this could be a very busy station.

Train Services

Services at Warrington Central station has as many as eight trains per hour passing through.

There is a lot of scope to provide a quality southern service between Liverpool and Manchester calling at Liverpool South Parkway, Widnes and Warrington Central. Warrington West station could be a part of this and I could see it getting between two and four semi fast trains per hour

Reading Green Park

Reading Green Park station will be on the Reading to Basingstoke Line between Reading West and Mortimer stations.

This Google Map shows the area.

Note the Reading to Basingstoke Line down the Western edge of the map.

Train Services

It is expected that services will be at least two trains per hour at the station.

The Reading to Basingstoke Line has the following characteristics.

  • It is electrified with 25 KVAC overhead at the Reading end.
  • It is electrified with 750 VDC third rail at the Basingstoke end.
  • It has less than fifteen miles of line without electrification,

Consequently, I feel that in a few years, this line will be within the capability of a battery powered train, charging on the short lengths of electrification at either end.

Bow Street

Bow Street station will be on the Cambrian Line between Aberwrystwyth and Borth stations.

This article on the BBC gives more details.

Train Services

The Cambrian Line has approximately pne train per hour between Aberwrystwyth and Shrewsbury.

Portway Parkway

Portway Parkway station will be a one platform station on the Severn Beach Line adoining the Portway Park-and-Ride.

Train Services

Wikipedia describes the Services on the line.

Costs Summary

This article from Railway Gazette International has a detailed summary of the costs of the five stations.

Horden Peterlee, Warrington West and Reading Green Park are medium-sized schemes to support housing and business developents and make it easier to get to employment in nearby towns and cities. But they will cost an average of £15million a station.

Certainly, where I live in Dalston and all across North London, the improved North London Line has had several positive effects.

Bow Street and Portway Parkway are small one-platform schemes, which hopefully will provide better Park-and-Ride facilities. The averae cost is a lot less at £4.5million.

Conclusion

It is well-proven that new stations are a way of increasing train usage and they are generally welcomed by train companies, passengers, residents and businesses.

But as the costs for these stations show, medium-sized full-function stations don’t come cheap.

Surely, though on the right housing or business development, designing a station into the development, as at Warrington West or Reading Green Park, must give a payback to the developer in easier sales and rentals.

The two simpler schemes would seem to be part of a trend, where well-designed one-platform stations are built for Park-and-Ride facilities, hospitals, housing developments and sporting venues.

I discuss these stations in The Rise Of One-Platform Stations.

Bow Street and Portway Parkway stations will add two more one-platform stations.

 

 

 

 

July 29, 2017 Posted by | Finance, Transport | , , , , , , | 2 Comments