The Anonymous Widower

Green Hydrogen For Scotland

The title of this post, has been taken from this press release from ITM Power, which is entitled ‘Green Hydrogen For Scotland’ To Help Reach Net Zero Targets: First Project To Deliver A 10MW Electrolyser To Glasgow Facility.

This is the introductory paragraph.

A pioneering Strategic partnership has been established to create new green hydrogen production facilities with clusters of refuelling stations across Scotland, supporting the country’s efforts to achieve net zero by 2045. ‘Green Hydrogen for Scotland’ – a partnership of ScottishPower Renewables, BOC (a Linde company) and ITM Power – brings together industry-leading names in the renewables and clean fuel industries to offer an end-to-end market solution for reducing vehicle emissions through the provision of green hydrogen.

Other details include.

  • The green hydrogen production facility located on the outskirts of Glasgow will be operated by BOC.
  • ITM Power will deliver a 10 MW electrolyser.
  • Electricity will come from , wind and solar produced by ScottishPower Renewables.
  • The project aims to supply hydrogen to the commercial market within the next two years.

This ITM Power infographic outlines Green Hydrogen for Scotland.

Surely it should be called tartan hydrogen. Does anybody know a tartan containing the blue of Scotland, the white of Yorkshire and the black, red and gold of Germany?

September 16, 2020 Posted by | Energy, Hydrogen, Transport | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

JCB Unveils World’s First Hydrogen Digger

The title of this post is the same as that of this article on International Vehicle Technology.

The signs have been there for some time.

  • JCB are one of the backers of ITM Power, who make large scale electrolysers in Rotherham.
  • Jo Bamford has a hydrogen company called Ryse.
  • Jo Bamford took over Wrightbus and is saying he’ll be building thousands of hydrogen buses a year.
  • Ryse have planning permission for a giant hydrogen electrolyser at Herne Bay.

To me, it is totally logical, that JCB build a hydrogen-powered digger.

And it appears they have got there first!

July 2, 2020 Posted by | Hydrogen | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

What Does the Future of Offshore Wind Energy Look Like?

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Real Clear Energy.

These topics are covered.

  • Improved efficiency
  • Aerodynamic blades
  • Sturdiness and durability
  • Big data, the cloud and artificial intelligence
  • Drones
  • Floating turbines and deeper waters
  • Complicated coastal climate zones of which North America has eight.

Some topics weren’t covered.

The author finishes with this statement.

The integration of wind energy, in any form, can ultimately benefit all 50 states in the US by 2050 if it starts now.

In 1962, Bob Dylan, wrote this famous phrase.

The answer, my friend, is blowin’ in the wind.

Fifty-eight years later he’s been proven right, in a big way!

 

July 2, 2020 Posted by | Energy | , , , | Leave a comment

South Korea Is On The Hunt For An Overseas Hydrogen Production Location

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Hydrogen Fuel News.

It is an interesting article, which talks about how both South Korea and Japan are looking to source hydrogen from another country and how Australia is in prime position.

This Wikipedia entry, which is entitled Energy In South Korea, has this breakdown of electricity production in South Korea.

  • Thermal – 65.3%
  • Nuclear – 31.1%
  • Hydro – 1.6%
  • Other – 2%

Note that at the time of writing the UK is producing 39.0% of electricity from renewables and 15.9% from low-carbon sources.

Consider.

  • As South Korea imports a lot of liquified natural gas and has no oil or gas resources of its own, importing hydrogen is just replacing a carbon-dioxide producing fuel with a zero-carbon one, that is produced from renewables.
  • Other than Australia, other possible sources of hydrogen mentioned include Saudi Arabia and the United States, but is their hydrogen produced from renewables or steam-reforming of methane?
  • I suspect another could be South Africa, as they can develop a lot of wind power around the Cape.

I think we’ll see more countries going down the same route as Japan and South Korea and importing large quantities of hydrogen.

  • Countries with lots of renewables like geothermal, hydro, solar and wind will benefit.
  • Countries with plenty of gas can use steam-reforming to create hydrogen.

But surely, the biggest beneficiaries will be world-class companies, like ITM Power in Rotherham, who build electrolysers.

 

June 25, 2020 Posted by | World | , , , | Leave a comment

Do We Need A UK Lithium-Ion Battery Factory?

My post, Gore Street Acquires 50MW Ferrymuir Battery Project, Eyes More In Scotland and the article on the Energyst with the same name, got me thinking.

It was this statement about Gore Street Energy Fund, that really started the thought.

The fund said the addition takes its portfolio built or under development to 293MW and added that is has options for a further 900MW.

Gore Street obviously have the money to build all of this energy storage.

  • I have also looked at some of their projects on Google Maps and there are still plenty of sites on green- or brown-field land close to electricity sub-stations, where energy storage would be easy to connect.
  • I suspect, they have some good engineers or electricity marketing specialists available.
  • My worry, would be, with many countries going the energy storage route, is there enough capacity to build all the batteries we need.

We have three routes, we could easily take in this country.

  • Convert suplus energy to hydrogen using electrolysers from ITM Power in Rotherham.
  • Develop some BALDIES (Build Anywhere Long Duration Intermittent Energy Storage). British technology is available as the CRYObatteryfrom Highview Power, who signed to build their first full-size plant in the UK, last week.
  • Build a lithium-ion battery factory. Preferably of the next generation, so that battery vehicles will go further on a charge.

It is my view, that we should do all three!

Will Gore Street, add a BALDIES to their portfolio of lithium-ion energy storage.

I think the decision makers at Gore Street would sleep comfortably in their beds if they bought a CRYObattery for a location, that needed a larger battery.

Conclusion

As to the answer to my question, the answer is yes, as mobile application will need more and better batteries and on balance, we should have our own supply.

 

 

June 24, 2020 Posted by | Energy Storage | , , , | 2 Comments

The World’s First Bi-Mode Hydrogen-Electric Train

This news page on the University of Birmingham web site is entitled HydroFLEX Secures Funding For Hydrogen-Powered Train Design.

The page is mainly about the new funding from Innovate UK, that I wrote about in First Of A Kind Funding Awarded For 25 Rail Innovation Projects, but it also includes this significant paragraph.

As well as being the UK’s first hydrogen-powered train, HydroFLEX is also the world’s first bi-mode electric hydrogen train. It will be undergoing mainline testing on the UK railway in the next few weeks.

One of my disappointments in the design of the Alstom Coradia iLint, is that, it is designed as a hydrogen-power only train, where it could surely have had a pantograph fitted, for more efficient working.

Consider.

  • I suspect many hydrogen-powered trains will only be doing short distances, where electrification is not available, so daily distances under hydrogen power could be quite short.
  • In the UK, a smaller hydrogen tank would certainly ease the design problems caused by a large fuel tank.
  • There have been improvements in hydrogen storage in recent years.

The funding award to the project talks about raft production, so are the engineers, aiming to design a hydrogen power-pack on rafts, that could be fitted underneath the large fleets of retired electric multiple units, that are owned by Porterbrook.

Now that would be a game changer.

  • Porterbrook have thirty-seven Class 350 trains, that will be replaced in the next few years by new trains. The electric trains are less than a dozen years old and Porterbrook have been talking about fitting batteries to these trains and creating a battery/FLEX train. Would making these trains bi-mode hydrogen-electric trains be better?
  • Birmingham wants to open up new rail routes in the city on lines without electrification. What would be better than a hydrogen powered train, designed in the city’s premier university?
  • Routes from Birmingham to Burton-on-Trent, Hereford, Leicester, Shrewsbury, Stratford-on-Avon and Worcester would be prime candidates for the deployment of a fleet of bi-mode hydrogen-electric trains.
  • Birmingham have already asked ITM Power to build a hydrogen filling station in the city for hydrogen buses.

 

June 18, 2020 Posted by | Transport | , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

A Trading Update From ITM Power

ITM Power issued a Press Release entitled Trading Update, this morning.

It is a document, that is a must-read about the future of hydrogen.

There are some interesting statements on various topics.

The Future Of Hydrogen Production

The Press Release says this.

Alongside the predicted growth trajectory for electrolysis, the cost outlook for green hydrogen is also positive. The Hydrogen Council expects green hydrogen to become cost competitive with grey hydrogen by 2025 assuming a €50 per ton CO2 price.  An 80GW electrolyser target for Europe by 2030 has been proposed, where electrolysers feed into a hydrogen transmission network that interconnects the renewable energy resources of the North Sea, Morocco and Ukraine with the demand centres of Europe.  Further afield, Australia is actively pursuing opportunities to export green hydrogen and has estimated that 69 per cent of the 2025 global market for hydrogen will lie in its four target markets of China, Japan, Korea and Singapore.

Note.

  1. Green hydrogen is produced by a zero-carbon process like electrolysis using renewable electricity.
  2. Grey hydrogen is produced by a process that releases carbon-dioxide like steam reforming of methane.

It looks like green hydrogen will be the future.

Governments And Green Hydrogen

The Press Release says this.

Governments are increasingly recognising the role of green hydrogen as a decarbonisation tool.  The U.K. government has introduced an overarching net zero target and placed an early focus on decarbonising industrial clusters that will lead to progressively larger deployments of electrolysers. In the Netherlands, the Dutch government has recently presented its green hydrogen vision for achieving a sustainable energy system that is reliable, clean and affordable.  A total of three European governments have now stated explicit electrolyser targets for 2030: Germany 5GW, Holland 3-4GW and Portugal 2GW.

It looks like a lot of electrolysers will be built.

The Germans And Hydrogen

The Press Release says this.

The German government announced in its stimulus package of 3 June 2020 that it will present a national hydrogen strategy in the short term. Accordingly, a programme for the development of hydrogen production plants will be developed to demonstrate industrial-scale production of up to 5GW total output in Germany, operational by 2030. For the period up to 2035, but until 2040 at the latest, an additional 5 GW will be added if possible. To implement all these measures, the German government will invest €7bn.

Not only is hydrogen zero-carbon, it also means they will buy less of Putin’s gas.

Conclusion

Hydrogen has a very long term future.

June 8, 2020 Posted by | World | , , , , , | 1 Comment

UK’s Largest Solar Park Cleve Hill Granted Development Consent

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Solar Power Portal.

These are the two introductory paragraphs.

Cleve Hill Solar Park, set to be the largest in the UK, has been granted development consent by the energy secretary.

The colossal 350MW project will include 880,000 panels along with battery storage, and sit just one mile northeast of Faversham, in Kent, situated close to the village of Graveney.

Other points from the article.

  • Cleeve Hill Solar Park is a £450million project.
  • It is the first solar project to be considered a Nationally Significant Infrastructure Project.
  • It is being developed as a joint venture between Hive Energy and Wirsol.
  • It is due to be operational by 2022.
  • To complete the project 700 MWh of energy storage will be added later.

The article also contains this quote from Solar Trade Associations chief executive Chris Hewett.

Solar has a significant role to play in boosting the economy in the wake of the coronavirus crisis. With the right policies we can expect to see an 8GW pipeline of solar projects unlocked and rapidly deployed, swiftly creating a wealth of skilled jobs and setting us on the path towards a green recovery.

8 GW of intermittent energy will need a lot of storage.

As Cleeve Hill’s developers are planning to provide 700 MWh of storage for 700 MW of solar panels, it would appear that 8 GW of solar panels could need up to 16 GWh of energy storage.

As our largest energy storage system is the pumped storage Electric Mountain in Snowdonia with a capacity of 9.1 GWh and most of the large solar developments are towards the South of England, the UK needs to develop a lot more energy storage, where the solar is generated and much of the energy is used.

I can see the following environmentally-friendly developments prospering.

  • Highview Power‘s CRYOBattery, which uses liquid air to store energy. Systems have a small footprint and up to a GWh could be possible.
  • Electrothermal energy storage like this system from Siemens.
  • Using electrolysers from companies like ITM Power to convert excess energy into hydrogen for transport, steelmaking and injecting into the gas main.
  • Zinc8‘s zinc-air battery could be the outsider, that comes from nowhere.

Developers could opt for conservative decision of lithium-ion batteries, but I don’t like the environmental profile and these batteries should be reserved for portable and mobile applications.

Floatovoltaics

One concept, I came across whilst writing was floatovoltaics.

The best article about the subject was this one on Renewable Energy World, which is entitled Running Out of Precious Land? Floating Solar PV Systems May Be a Solution.

A French company call Ciel et Terre International seem to be leading the development.

Their web site has this video.

Perhaps, some floatovoltaics, should be installed on the large reservoirs in the South of England.

  • The Renewable Energy World article says that panels over water can be more efficient due to the cooling effect of the water.
  • Would they cut evaporative losses by acting as sunshades?
  • As the French are great pecheurs, I suspect that they have the answers if anglers should object.

This Google Map shows the reservoirs to the West of Heathrow.

Note.

  1. Wraysbury Reservoir has an area of two square kilometres.
  2. King George VI Reservoir has an area of one-and-a-half square kilometres.
  3. Using the size and capacity of Owl’s Hatch Solar Farm, it appears that around 65 MW of solar panels can be assembled in a square kilometre.
  4. All these reservoirs are Sites of Special Scientific Interest because of all the bird life.
  5. Heathrow is not an airport, that is immune to bird-strikes.

Could floatovoltaics be used to guide birds away from the flightpaths?

Incidentally, I remember a report from Tomorrow’s World, probably from the 1960s, about a porous concrete that had been invented.

  • One of the uses would have been to fill reservoirs.
  • The capacity of the reservoir would only have been marginally reduced, as the water would be in the voids in the concrete like water in a sponge.
  • Soil would be placed at the surface and the land used for growing crops.

I wonder what happened to that idea from fifty years ago!

June 5, 2020 Posted by | Energy Storage | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Joint Venture With Linde AG And £38M Strategic Investment

The title of this post, is the same as that as this Press Release from ITM Power.

This is the first paragraph.

ITM Power plc  is pleased to announce its intention to raise at least £52.0 million (before expenses) through (i) a strategic investment of £38.0 million at 40 pence per share by Linde UK Holdings No. 2 Limited, a member of the Linde AG group (Linde) (the Share Subscription); and (ii) a conditional placing of £14.0 million at 40 pence per share (the Firm Placed Shares) with certain existing and new institutional investors (the Firm Placing).   The Group has also entered into a 50/50 joint venture with Linde (the Joint Venture) which will focus on delivering green hydrogen to large scale industrial projects, principally those with an installed electrolyser capacity of 10 Megawatts (“MW”) and above.

There is all the usual financial stuff and these sentences.

The net proceeds of the fundraising will be used principally to enhance the manufacturing capabilities of the Group, particularly for the development and production of large scale 5MW electrolysers, to facilitate product standardisation and manufacturing cost reduction.

The Joint Venture will focus on delivering green hydrogen to large scale industrial projects (generally being opportunities with installed electrolyser capacities of 10 Megawatts and above)

As ITM Power are constructing the largest electrolyser factory in the world, at Bessemer park in Sheffield, it appears to me that ITM Power are going for the larger scale hydrogen market.

Recently, I wrote these three posts.

News stories generated about the company or the production of hydrogen seem to require large electrolysers in excess of 5 MW.

It looks like ITM Power are setting themselves up to tap this market substantially.

How Much Hydrogen Would A 5 MW Electrolyser Create In A Day?

I found the key to the answer to this question on this page of the Clean Energy Partnership web site.

To produce hydrogen by electrolysis directly at the filling station, the CEP currently requires about 55 kWh/kg H2 of electricity at an assumed rate of efficiency of > 60 percent.

To produce 1 kg of hydrogen, nine times the amount of water is necessary, i.e. nine litres.

I will use that figure in the calculation.

  • A 5MW electrolyser will consume 120 MWh in twenty-four hours.
  • This amount of electricity will produce 2,182 Kg or 2.182 tonnes of hydrogen.
  • It will also consume 19.64 tonnes of water.

In Surplus Electricity From Wind Farms To Make Hydrogen For Cars And Buses, I described how Jo Bamford and his company; Ryse Hydrogen, have applied for planning permission to build the UK’s largest electrolyser at Herne Bay in Kent.

  • It will produce ten tonnes of hydrogen a day.
  • The hydrogen will be sent by road to London to power buses.

So could the electrolyser be a 25 MW unit built of five 5 MW modular electrolysers?

Linde and their UK subsidiary; BOC, must have a lot of knowledge in transporting tonnes of hydrogen by road. I can remember seeing BOC’s trucks behind ICI’s Castner-Kellner works in the 1970s, where they collected hydrogen to see to other companies.

 

May 29, 2020 Posted by | Transport, World | , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

H2OzBus Project: Deploying Hydrogen Fuel Cell Bus Fleets For Public Transport Across Australia

The title of the this post, is the same as that of this Press Release from ITM Power.

This is the introductory paragraph.

ITM Power, the energy storage and clean fuel company, is pleased to announce the formation of the H2OzBus Project (“the Project”) and the signing of a memorandum of understanding with strategic partners (“the Consortium”).  The Consortium comprises Transit Systems, part of the SeaLink Travel Group, Ballard Power Systems, BOC Limited, Palisade Investment Partners and ITM Power.  The Consortium partners have signed a memorandum of understanding as a further step in evaluating and demonstrating the concept of hydrogen fuel cell electric buses for use in public bus transport in Australia.

Some further points from the Press Release.

  • Initially, a hundred buses will be deployed.
  • The buses appear to be being built in Australia.
  • Ten locations are being considered for the buses.

It looks to be a very sensible project.

May 25, 2020 Posted by | Transport | , , , | 1 Comment