The Anonymous Widower

H2-Share Launches First Hydrogen Truck

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on H2-View.

These are the two introductory paragraphs.

H2-Share’s first hydrogen-powered rigid truck has hit the road in the Netherlands.

The European project aims to facilitate the development of a market for low-carbon heavy-duty vehicles that run on hydrogen for logistic application.

It looks a well-thought out project to develop a market for hydrogen trucks.

  • Looking at the picture, it appears that the project has taken an off-the-shelf DAF truck and modified it for hydrogen.
  • The truck is a two-axle 27 tonne truck.

I shall follow this project.

April 9, 2020 Posted by | Transport | , , | Leave a comment

Coming Or Going?

I took the pictures of this lorry carrying concrete staircases in the Balls Pond Road.

I like a good puzzle. So where were these three staircases going on a truck, that was obviously from Cornwall?

  • They look to be very well-made, with a quality finish.
  • Had they been made in Cornwall and were being delivered to a skyscraper in the City?
  • Had they been made in East London and were being taken to Cornwall?

The truck was facing Highbury Corner, so would the second be the most likely?

On the other hand, Google found a company called Cornish Concrete Products at Bissoe, only a few miles from Redruth.

April 9, 2020 Posted by | Transport | , , , , | Leave a comment

De Beauvoir Square

This is my local square, which is about fifteen minutes walk.

Note.

  1. C and I tried to buy one of the Dutch style houses in the square from the screenwriter; Alun Owen in about 1971.
  2. It would have cost just £7,500. Now a hundred times that, wouldn’t buy it!
  3. There was a gardener at work.

De Beauvoir Town is not what you’d expect in Hackney.

April 9, 2020 Posted by | Uncategorized, World | | Leave a comment

Queuing For Marks And Spencer In Dalston

I took this picture of the orderly queue waiting to get into Marks and Spencer in Dalston.

It does appear that everybody was obeying the rules and I only took twenty minutes to enter the store.

  • The store was well-stocked, although there were very few ready meals with long Best Before dates.
  • Gluten-free bread, biscuits and cereals were at near normal levels.
  • There were about a dozen bottles of Adnams low-alcohol beer on the shelves, which I reduced by a couple.
  • There were no gluten-free cakes. Not that I buy them often.
  • Some lines like gluten-free sandwiches seem to have been dropped. Not that I wanted any, as I won’t be travelling.
  • The staff were being very professional.

I was able to get enough food in my bag to get me through to the middle of next week.

April 9, 2020 Posted by | Food, Health, World | , , , , , | 1 Comment

Greater Manchester Police Warning After 660 Parties Shut Down

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on the BBC.

This is the introductory paragraph.

Greater Manchester Police has warned people not to breach lockdown rules over Easter after it had to break up 660 parties last weekend.

This was also reported.

  • There were 1,132 coronavirus-related breaches reported between Saturday and Tuesday.
  • Some of the 494 house parties had DJs, fireworks and bouncy castles.
  • There were also 166 street parties.
  • One woman in Bury was arrested.

The force also had to deal with 122 different groups gathering to play sports, 173 more gatherings in parks and 112 incidents of anti-social behaviour and public disorder.

There have been some similar reports in London, but not on this scale.

So why is it, that Manchester disobeyed the rules so much?

Is it because the BBC is in Manchester and it’s easy to report?

April 9, 2020 Posted by | Health | , , , | 5 Comments

A Bus For The Twenty-First Century

What puzzles me, is why bus drivers in London, seem to be suffering more from COVID-19 infection, than drivers elsewhere!

In London, all buses have two or three doors and contactless ticketing, whereas in many parts of the UK, there is often only one door and no contactless ticketing.

This must mean, that there is generally less interaction between the driver and passengers in the capital. So logic would say, that outside of London, there should be more passing of infections between everybody on the bus.

An Observation In Manchester

Ten years ago, I observed behaviour on a single-door Manchester bus going to Oldham, with a union rep for bus drivers, who by chance happened to be sitting beside me.

The scrum as passengers entered and left the bus by the same door was horrific and the rep told me, that the local riff-raff were always trying to nick the driver’s money.

He told me, that a London system based on contactless ticketing was union policy and would cut attacks on staff, which he said had virtually stopped in London.

A Bus For The Twenty-First Century

The government has said that millions will be available for new zero-carbon buses, powered by hydrogen. I doubt that batteries will be able to provide enough power for many years.

It is my belief that given the new circumstances, that the bus should also have the following features.

  • It should be as infection-unfriendly as possible, as COVID-19 won’t be the last deadly infection.
  • Contactless ticketing by credit card or pass.
  • Full CCTV  to identify non-payers or those with stolen cards.
  • Two doors with one in the middle for entry and one at the back for exit.
  • It would be possible on some routes for both doors to be used for entry and exit.
  • Wheelchairs would enter and leave by the middle door, where the ramp would be fitted.

I would put the stairs to the top deck on the left hand side of the bus, with the foot of the stairs leading directly into the lobby by the middle door.

The Van Hool ExquiCity

The Van Hool ExquiCity is an alternative solution, that is already running in Belfast, where it is named Glider.

It is probably best described as a double-ended articulated bus, that runs on rubber tyres, that thinks it’s a tram.

This press release from Ballard is entitled Ballard-Powered Fuel Cell Tram-Buses From Van Hool Now in Revenue Service in France, describes the latest hydrogen-powered version of the Exquicity, which is now in service in Pau in France.

  • Each bus appears to be powered by a 100 kW hydrogen fuel cell.
  • The buses are over eighteen metres long.
  • Twenty-four metre double-articulated tram-buses are available.
  • The buses seat 125 passengers
  • The buses have a range of 300 kilometres between refuelling.

I like the concept, as it brings all the advantages of a tram at a lower cost.

Here’s a video.

It certainly seems a quiet bus.

I desperately need to get to Pau to see these vehicles.

Conclusion

We could design a new bus for the twenty-first century, that tackles the problems facing the bus industry.

  • Climate change and global warming.
  • Control of deadly infections like COVID-19.
  • Efficient, fast ticketing.
  • Attacks on staff.
  • Petty crime.
  • Access to public transport for the disabled, the elderly and those with reduced mobility.

We certainly have the skills to design and manufacture a suitable bus.

April 9, 2020 Posted by | Energy Storage, Health, Transport | , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments