The Anonymous Widower

The Great Bus Robbery

Transport for London (TfL) obviously don’t like people where I live in the Northern part of De Beauvoir Town in the London Borough of Hackney.

When I moved here, ten years ago there were six bus routes that passed through the traffic lights where the Balls Pond Road (It is not a made-up-name from Round The Horne) and Southgate Road/Mildmay Park meet.

  • 21 – Newington Green and Lewisham Shopping Centre
  • 30 – Marble Arch and Hackney Wick (From the sublime to the ridiculous?)
  • 38 – Victoria station and the romantic Clapton Pond
  • 56 – Bart’s Hospital and Whipps Cross (You’d be cross, if you’d been whipped!)
  • 141 – London Bridge Station and Palmers Green North Circular Road (Surely, another romantic destination!)
  • 277 – Highbury & Islington Station and Crossharbour

Note.

  1. We had two bus routes to and from Highbury & Islington station for Dear Old Vicky!
  2. We had two bus routes to and from Moorgate, Bank and the City of London.
  3. We had four bus routes to and from Dalston Junction station and the cultural attractions of Hackney Central.
  4. We had a direct bus to Canary Wharf.

TfL looked at the name of the district and thought the posh French name, meant we were all had expensive vehicles or Hackney carriages and said we had too many buses.

So in June 2018,  the 277 bus was cut back to Dalston Junction station and TfL promised that the frequency of the 30 bus would be increased. We’re still waiting for extra services.

Now, if you want to go to Highbury & Islington station, according to TfL’s Journey Planner, it’s often quicker to take a 38 or 56 bus to Essex Road station and take a train.

To make matters worse the 30 bus route now has cheap and nasty Egyptian-built buses with more steps than Russia. All buses should have flat floors like the New Routemasters.

What is TfL’s latest crime?

The 21 and 271 buses are going to be combined into a new route between Lewisham and Highgate, which will go nowhere near the Balls Pond Road.

So we’ll just have the one bus route to the City of London.

On past form, if TfL say they will increase the frequency, I wouldn’t believe them.

I think that TfL have ignored some problems.

The Elderly And Disabled

Between Newington Green and Englefield Road, a higher proportion of the passengers getting on the 21 and 141 buses seem to be in these groups.

  • As it’s a nice place to live, I suspect many elderly people have just stayed on.
  • I believe that North of the Balls Pond Road, there are some care homes and sheltered housing.

Have TfL analysed their passengers?

Not Everybody Has Cars

There are several blocks of social housing on the Newington Green and Englefield Road stretch and you see a lot of passengers who don’t look like car owners.

The lack of parking and the Low Traffic Neighbourhoods don’t help.

Access To Waterloo

My quickest way to Waterloo, which is London’s busiest rail terminal, is to take a bus to Bank and then get the Drain.

A halved service to Bank station will probably force me to take longer routes.

Tradition

When I was a child in the 1950s, the 141 was the 641 trolley bus, which ran between Winchmore Hill and Moorgate.

People, who live in Wood Green, Turnpike Lane and Manor House still commute to the City by bus, as people have done for over a hundred years.

I suspect a lot of commuters change from the Piccadilly Line to the 141 bus at Manor House station. I certainly use that route if I’m going to Southgate or Cockfosters.

The 21 bus starts at Newington Green, which means if you want to go from Balls Pond Road to Bank, you’ll usually get on a 21 bus, as the 141 buses are full with passengers from further North.

So it looks like to get to Moorgate, we’ll need to get a bus to Angel and then get the Northern Line, after the rerouting of the 21 bus.

Crossrail

This will have a big effect.

Suppose you live in Wood Green and want to get to Crossrail.

There is no obvious connection, but tradition will mean your preferred route will be to take a 141 bus between Manor House and Moorgate.

There will also be a quick route between Moorgate and Liverpool Street station, that I wrote about in London’s First Underground Roller Coaster.

We will need the 21 bus to provide us with a route to Crossrail, as the 141 buses will be full.

Conclusion

The 21 bus is needed where it is and mustn’t be stolen.

 

 

November 22, 2021 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

De Beauvoir Square

This is my local square, which is about fifteen minutes walk.

Note.

  1. C and I tried to buy one of the Dutch style houses in the square from the screenwriter; Alun Owen in about 1971.
  2. It would have cost just £7,500. Now a hundred times that, wouldn’t buy it!
  3. There was a gardener at work.

De Beauvoir Town is not what you’d expect in Hackney.

April 9, 2020 Posted by | World | | Leave a comment

Walking Through De Beauvoir Town

I took these pictures as I walked through de Beauvoir Town, as I walked through today on my way to and from the doctor’s to get my hand dressed.

There wasn’t many people about and I perhaps only got within three metres to one person and her dog.

What would help would be a few seats, so that elderly people like me could take a break.

March 23, 2020 Posted by | World | , | Leave a comment

The Need For Small Offices In London

The De Beauvoir Block is a block near me, that contains several dozen small office units.

As the pictures show, the offices in the extension, seem to be all spoken for.

Brexit may or may not be happening, but London still seems to be going its own way!

May 1, 2019 Posted by | Business | , | Leave a comment

Dalston Goes French

I know that De Beauvoir Town, where I live, is next to Dalston’s Kingsland Road, which is the local High Street, but surely for the local Marks and Spencer to sell sandwiches labelled in French is going a bit far.

What would the Rees-Moggies say of this?

August 17, 2018 Posted by | Food | , , , | Leave a comment

Why I’m In Favour Of Cycling Superhighways

Near me there is a junction, which drivers access, like Lewis Hamilton going into the pits at Silverstone.

It means they can get through to the City quicker.

But over the last few weeks, the number of drivers taking the bend quickly and putting pedestrians in danger has dropped significantly. I’ve also seen drivers go hurtling off doiwn the road only to come back a couple of minutes later, with faces like thunder.

I just give them a knowing look!

So why has a dangerous junction become a lot safer?

Cycling Superhighway 1, goes across the rat-run and it has been used to choke off the rats, as the pictures show.

I’m now very much in favour of the Cycling Superhughways despite being told by every taxi-driver I use, that they are a complete pain!

But then I don’t drive!

December 24, 2016 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , | 2 Comments

Is This How To Do Small Business?

Opposite Ed’s Shed in De Beauvoir Town is an old factory block of indeterminate age, with little architectural merit.

So what is happening?

It is being turned into a series of units for small businesses called the De Beauvoir Block.

Surely, we need more initiatives like this?

I should say, that although De Beauvoir Town is mainly residential, tucked into lots of the nooks and crannies , there are small business units.

Like the De Beauvoir Block, many have been created by the landowner, the Benyon Estate.

The estate are not distant, like many of the owners of large parts of our cities, but seem to want to create a vibrant and prosperous community.

After all, modern economics says they would make more money by flattering the block and building tower blocks of buy-to-leave flats.

The biggest tragedy of the area is that parts of De Beauvoir Town were demolished in the 1960s to build anonymous local authority housing, some of which has already been rebuilt.

The good thing though, is that there are still more nooks, crannies and factories to do some more creative development.

July 1, 2016 Posted by | World | , | Leave a comment

Ed’s Shed

This house is in the heart of De Beauvoir Town, which is the area of London, where I live on the Northern edge.

Ed's Shed

Ed’s Shed

It is an unusual modern house to sit amongst all the Georgian ones. It is not the only one in the Conservation Area.

It’s called Ed’s Shed and there is a web site.

I like it!

Why don’t we get more adventurous modern houses? Architects are creating the future and we don’t want uniformity!

July 1, 2016 Posted by | World | , , | 1 Comment

Walking From De Beauvoir Town To London Fields

This walk follows the route that I traced in Cycling Across De Beauvoir Town.

I’ll show the Google Map from that post

Cycling Across De Beauvoir Town

Cycling Across De Beauvoir Town

The route, which I started on Southgate Road is traced by the blue line. I continued up Middleton Road to London Fields.

These are pictures I took on the way.

It is an absolutely flat route, except for the dip under the railway. This will surely encourage people to walk and cycle along it.

November 15, 2015 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , | 1 Comment

Cycling Across De Beauvoir Town

When I wrote Walking From Haggerston Station To Mare Street, I hadn’t realised how the scheme to effectively convert Middleton Road into a car-free route, would affect De Beauvoir Town.

Look at this Google Map, which shows the car-free route across London Fields.

Car-Free Route Through London Fields

Car-Free Route Through London Fields

The map is rather vague about what happens when it crosses the Kingsland Road and all it shows is a wavy line, which if you enlarge it and use a magnifying glass, has something like Northchurch Road written on it. This Google Map shows the area from Southgate to Kingsland Roads.

Cycling Across De Beauvoir Town

Cycling Across De Beauvoir Town

I think as Middleton Road links up to the South Side of De Beauvoir Square, that the downward kink in the route is De Beauvoir Square, so the route goes past St.Peter’s Church and then up Northchurch Road. For the first part of Northchurch Road, the route is following the route of the Cycle Superhighway CS1, that goes up Culford Road.

The two cycling routes are marked in blue on the map.

If the traffic scheme in London Fields is made permanent, I think I will be pleased, as it would give me a car-free cycle route from my house to the Cultural Quarter of Hackney.

If there were Boris Bike stations in De Beauvoir and London Fields, I wouldn’t even have to buy a bike.

On the other hand the London Fields scheme could generate a lot of cycling traffic through De Beauvoir Town.

Others might not be so pleased!

Later I walked the route and there are photographs of it in Walking From De Beauvoir Town to London Fields

November 15, 2015 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , , | 1 Comment