The Anonymous Widower

A Lump Near My Liver

In A Mysterious Attack On My Body, I explained how I ended up in the Royal London hospital after my hand stopped working, probably due to an infection.

A couple of weeks afterwards my GP called me in to the surgery and repeated the blood tests on my liver, as the first taken in the hospital, weren’t quite what they should be!

These blood tests didn’t show the improvement they should have done, so I went to Homerton Hospital for an ultrasound on my liver.

This didn’t satisfy the GP, so he arranged for a CT-Scan at Homerton hospital.

After the scan, but before the results were known I saw a consultant, who told me about the lump.

He said it could be benign or something nasty and hopefully after he reviews the CT-Scan next week, we’ll know.

He said an endoscopy will probably sort out what it is!

The weird thing, is that, I’m not in any pain.

Except that is, for the lower back pain, I’ve had since I was about twenty.

As I can never sit comfortably in a car and my mother told me, my spine turns the wrong way, that probably explains that.

When I’m working at the computer, about every half-hour, I lie flat on my back on the floor and that seems to sort it.

Why did I get such an odd body?

Any advice gratefully accepted.

July 4, 2021 Posted by | Health | , , | 1 Comment

Are Disposable Nappies A Wasted Resource?

I stated my views on disposable nappies in this post called Disposable Nappies, where this was the first sentence.

From a scientifically green point of view, in many places I’m against using disposable nappies, as they clog sewers, end up in landfill and I’ve even seen them in litter bins in parks. We used real nappies for all our three children in the seventies, washing them ourselves in a machine for the first and then using a nappy service for the last two.

But dirty nappies contain a lot of the ingredients, that can be used to make hydrocarbons.

This article from the Sunday Times in 2018 is entitled Syngas, The New Jet Fuel — Stinky Nappies And Coffee Cups.

These are the first two paragraphs of The Times article.

With their packed cabins and recycled air, long-haul passenger jets are the last place where you would want to encounter the whiff of a dirty nappy.

However, old nappies are to be used — along with other non-recyclable waste such as meal packaging and takeaway coffee cups — to power British Airways planes.

Syngas is a mixture of hydrogen, carbon monoxide and some carbon dioxide. Some countries without access to petroleum or diesel created syngas and then used the Fischer–Tropsch process to create the fuels they needed. The process doesn’t have a good reputation as the two main countries to use the process were Germany under the Nazis and South Africa during apartheid.

Why is the use of this process being revived to produce aviation biofuel or sustainable aviation fuel for British Airways?

According to Wikipedia, it can save between 20 and 98 % of carbon emissions compared to conventional jet fuel.

The same process can also make biodiesel for buses, trains and trucks

It’s certainly an area, where a lot of research is going on! Just type “syngas nappies” or “syngas diapers” into Google and you’ll get a lot of serious hits.

By my front door I have a well-designed blue bin.

This is for my food waste bin, which is collected once a week.

This page on the Hackney web site is entitled Food Waste Recycling, and this is said about where the food waste goes.

Food waste from households in Hackney is sent to an anaerobic digestion facility in south east England, where it’s turned into renewable energy to power homes and biofertiliser to be spread on local farmland to grow crops.

A similar bin of an appropriate size could be used for nappies.

The nappies would go to an appropriate recycling site, instead of down the toilet or into landfill.

 

 

July 4, 2021 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Technology Company Announces Deal That Could Produce Nearly 30 million Gallons Of Aviation Fuel In Mississippi

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on magnoliastatelive.

This is the first two paragraphs.

A technology company that has developed technology to turn household waste and forest waste into aviation fuel says it has signed an agreement that will help it produce 30 million gallons of fuel in Mississippi every year.

Velocys officials announced this week that they have signed a framework agreement with Koch Project Solutions to develop their biorefinery project which produces standard aviation fuel, in Natchez.

That all sounds good for the spin-out of Oxford University,

July 4, 2021 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , | Leave a comment