The Anonymous Widower

Welsh Firm Wins £300K BEIS Grant To Advance Hydrogen Fuel Tech

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Wales247.

This is the first two paragraphs.

A gasification pioneer aims to seal the UK’s low-carbon future after winning a Government grant worth nearly £300,000 to develop waste-to-hydrogen production technology, innovation funding specialist Catax can reveal.

Compact Syngas Solutions (CSS), based in Deeside, Wales, has secured £299,886 from the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) with the help of Catax. The funding comes from the Low Carbon Hydrogen Supply 2 Programme, which is part of the Net Zero Innovation Portfolio.

Note.

  1. The objective is produce syngas or green hydrogen from waste that would normally be sent to landfill.
  2. Syngas, or synthesis gas, is a fuel gas mixture consisting primarily of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and very often some carbon dioxide.
  3. Syngas can be used as a fuel in internal combustion engines.

The name of the company; Compact Syngas Solutions could indicate that the company aim to have a compact system to produce syngas or green hydrogen.

I have come across other companies looking at waste diverted from landfill to create aviation fuel, diesel or hydrogen.

I have invested in one; Velocys, through the Stock Market, as I feel this area of technology will be big in the future.

Compact Syngas Solutions seem to have a different take. However like many other, I suspect catalysts are involved.

Conclusion

I think, this will be a company to watch.

May 23, 2022 Posted by | Energy | , , , , , | 1 Comment

Velocys’s Waste-To-Fuel Project Moves Forward

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Let’s Recycle.

This is the first paragraph.

Velocys says it has completed works at its Altalto plant in Immingham, North East Lincolnshire, in preparation for a future connection to the East Coast Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) cluster.

In partnership with British Airways, Velocys is developing a facility that could convert up to 500,000 tonnes of municipal solid waste into fuel for planes and cars each year.

At last, this very interesting and important project is underway.

I believe that plants like this could be the way we keep flying until hydrogen-powered planes are developed.

April 9, 2022 Posted by | Energy | , , , , | Leave a comment

With Southwest Airlines Deal, Velocys Presells 100% Of The Output From Its US Biobased Jet Fuel Project

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on the American Chemical Society.

This is the first paragraph.

The biofuel maker Velocys has signed jet fuel purchase agreements with Southwest Airlines and International Airlines Group. Velocys says it now has agreements for the entire output of the facility it plans to open in Mississippi in 2026. The plant, known as Bayou Fuels, will use gasification and Fischer-Tropsch chemistry to make the fuel from wood waste. It will be fitted with carbon-capture equipment from Oxy Low Carbon Ventures, making its fuel net-negative in CO2 emissions. The two airlines have also agreed to buy the resulting greenhouse gas.

Note that the technology is net-negative in carbon dioxide emissions.

This must be a short-term route to decarbonise existing aviation.

 

November 22, 2021 Posted by | Energy | , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Velocys Announces Long-Term Clean Avgas Deals With Airline Behemoths

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on the Energyst.

This is the first paragraph.

Fuel-from-waste pioneer Velocys has made the world’s biggest sustainable aviation fuel (SAF) plant more investible, as it detailed massive likely long-term supply deals to two big airline groups.

The share price seemed to benefit from the announcement.

I’m not bothered, as I have a small investment.

 

 

November 12, 2021 Posted by | Energy, Finance | , , | Leave a comment

Velocys Welcomes US Government SAF Policy Support

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on London South East.

This is the first paragraph.

Velocys plc – Oxford, England-based fuels technology company – Welcomes US government announcement last week of a set of comprehensive new policy actions in support for Sustainable Aviation Fuel production in the US. Notes Velocys is cited in a White House briefing paper setting out the Biden administration’s plans to incentivise commercial scale supply of SAF in the US to meet decarbonisation objectives while stimulating economic growth.

I hope that being cited by the White House is a good thing.

I do think though, that Velocys have the technology, that could help us to keep flying until hydrogen-powered aircraft are developed.

September 15, 2021 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , , | 2 Comments

Velocys’ Fischer–Tropsch Tech Picked For E-fuels Project In Japan

The title of this post is the same as that of this article on Renewables Now.

Fischer–Tropsch technology has a chequered history, as it has been used by regimes like Nazi Germany and South Africa under apartheid to create the fuel they need.

But now Oxford University spin-out company; Velocys have improved the process, so that it can turn rubbish destined for landfill into sustainable aviation fuel.

This is the last paragraph from the article.

The developer says its FT reactor can enable the production of SAF from household waste and woody biomass. The end product is a high-quality version of existing fuels, requiring no changes to engines or infrastructure, Velocys says on its website.

This is surely a viable alternative to keep airlines flying, until  hydrogen-powered planes are developed.

August 29, 2021 Posted by | Energy, Transport/Travel | , , , , , | 3 Comments

Are Disposable Nappies A Wasted Resource?

I stated my views on disposable nappies in this post called Disposable Nappies, where this was the first sentence.

From a scientifically green point of view, in many places I’m against using disposable nappies, as they clog sewers, end up in landfill and I’ve even seen them in litter bins in parks. We used real nappies for all our three children in the seventies, washing them ourselves in a machine for the first and then using a nappy service for the last two.

But dirty nappies contain a lot of the ingredients, that can be used to make hydrocarbons.

This article from the Sunday Times in 2018 is entitled Syngas, The New Jet Fuel — Stinky Nappies And Coffee Cups.

These are the first two paragraphs of The Times article.

With their packed cabins and recycled air, long-haul passenger jets are the last place where you would want to encounter the whiff of a dirty nappy.

However, old nappies are to be used — along with other non-recyclable waste such as meal packaging and takeaway coffee cups — to power British Airways planes.

Syngas is a mixture of hydrogen, carbon monoxide and some carbon dioxide. Some countries without access to petroleum or diesel created syngas and then used the Fischer–Tropsch process to create the fuels they needed. The process doesn’t have a good reputation as the two main countries to use the process were Germany under the Nazis and South Africa during apartheid.

Why is the use of this process being revived to produce aviation biofuel or sustainable aviation fuel for British Airways?

According to Wikipedia, it can save between 20 and 98 % of carbon emissions compared to conventional jet fuel.

The same process can also make biodiesel for buses, trains and trucks

It’s certainly an area, where a lot of research is going on! Just type “syngas nappies” or “syngas diapers” into Google and you’ll get a lot of serious hits.

By my front door I have a well-designed blue bin.

This is for my food waste bin, which is collected once a week.

This page on the Hackney web site is entitled Food Waste Recycling, and this is said about where the food waste goes.

Food waste from households in Hackney is sent to an anaerobic digestion facility in south east England, where it’s turned into renewable energy to power homes and biofertiliser to be spread on local farmland to grow crops.

A similar bin of an appropriate size could be used for nappies.

The nappies would go to an appropriate recycling site, instead of down the toilet or into landfill.

 

 

July 4, 2021 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Technology Company Announces Deal That Could Produce Nearly 30 million Gallons Of Aviation Fuel In Mississippi

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on magnoliastatelive.

This is the first two paragraphs.

A technology company that has developed technology to turn household waste and forest waste into aviation fuel says it has signed an agreement that will help it produce 30 million gallons of fuel in Mississippi every year.

Velocys officials announced this week that they have signed a framework agreement with Koch Project Solutions to develop their biorefinery project which produces standard aviation fuel, in Natchez.

That all sounds good for the spin-out of Oxford University,

July 4, 2021 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , | Leave a comment

Velocys Technology Powers First Commercial Flight

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Biomass Magazine.

This is the first two paragraphs.

Velocys plc, the sustainable fuels technology company, is pleased to announce that sustainable aviation fuel (SAF) produced by the company’s proprietary technology using woody biomass residue feedstock has been used in a commercial flight by Japan Airlines.

Japan Airlines flight (JAL #515) from Tokyo to Sapporo was completed on June 17.

Note.

  1. From the picture, the aircraft appears to be an Airbus A350.
  2. Velocys is a sign-out from Oxford University.

Sustainable Aviation Fuel is definitely on its way.

June 22, 2021 Posted by | Energy, Transport/Travel | , , | Leave a comment

New Facility In Scotland To Turn Waste Plastic Into Hydrogen

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Hydrogen Fuel News.

This is the first paragraph.

Peel NRE, a part of Peel Land & Property, has unveiled its plans for a second waste plastic to hydrogen facility. This one will be installed on the River Clyde’s north bank at the Rothesay Dock in West Dunbartonshire.

A few relevant points from the article.

  • The facility will cost £20 million.
  • Input will be non-recyclable plastics, that otherwise would go to landfill.
  • There will be a hydrogen filling station at the site.
  • The facility can handle 13500 tonnes of plastic per year
  • The facility will use technology developed by the Powerhouse Energy Group.

It sounds like, we need more of these plastic to hydrogen facilities!

 

June 4, 2021 Posted by | Hydrogen | , , , , , , | 3 Comments