The Anonymous Widower

Blood Testing At The Royal London Hospital

The Royal London Hospital is still trying to get to the bottom of my health incident, that I wrote about in The Hour Change Has Completely Knocked Me Out.

On Monday, I had a serious liver scan by ultrasound at Barts Hospital and today, I was phoned up by the Royal London to invite me to take a blood test to check against those that they took a couple of weeks ago.

They said to turn up any day before five and they would do it there and then.

As I was going past the hospital this afternoon, I turned up about two-thirty, without a prior appointment.

I logged myself into a queuing system, which was more McDonalds or Leon, than NHS and sat for about fifteen minutes, whilst the patients in front of me were tested.

As I sat there, I was approached by a doctor doing research. He asked if I would give a couple of extra vials of blood for his research.

As I knew that this would only delay me for a few more seconds, I said yes and filled in his form, which asked no important ethical questions.

Is the system in use at the Royal London Hospital research-friendly?

Suppose, a researcher is looking into the frequency of a particular gene in a population. They could just ask patients for a sample.

November 24, 2022 Posted by | Health | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Beware Of Getting Hospital Appointments Wrong

On Monday, I had an appointment for an ultrasound examination on my liver at the local hospital at 09:40.

The appointment had been arranged by telephone and I also had a text which included the phrase “Please refer to your letter for pre-attendance advice and instructions.” I had been given basic instructions over the telephone, but I did not receive the letter. This is not the hospital’s fault, as I have received many letters in the past from the hospital and its Trust.

But my post has been very erratic these last few weeks and I suspect the letter is delayed somewhere.

As it happened, it didn’t matter, as the basic instructions sufficed and the ultrasound was a success all round.

Perhaps, in these days of problems with the Royal Mail, it may be prudent to include minimum instructions in the text message reminder.

November 23, 2022 Posted by | Health | , , | 1 Comment

Should Hospitals Be The Power Backup Locations?

I was reading an article in The Times about how protestors were blocking roads in Central London and they’re inadvertently stopped an ambulance.

So this question occurred to me. Why I don’t know, but my mind has always jumped about and put thoughts together?

Consider.

  • The latest generation of energy storage that could be used to back up the grid are coming down in physical size.
  • Hospitals have complex power systems, as they use a lot of electricity.
  • Hospitals need emergency power backup.
  • Because of their high electrical use, hospitals will have a high capacity connection to the National Grid.
  • Some modern treatments need a lot of electricity.
  • Will ambulances be battery-powered and will need to be charged up, whilst delivering patients?
  • Many bus routes terminate at the local hospital, so if the buses are battery-powered, these could be charged as well.

As an Electrical and Control Engineer, I feel that to put a town, city or are’s back-up battery at the hospital would be a sensible idea.

Hospitals should be designed to be health, energy and transport hubs for their communities.

October 11, 2022 Posted by | Energy, Energy Storage, Health, Transport/Travel | , , , | Leave a comment

Ukraine Maternity Hospital ‘Destroyed’ By Russian Shelling

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on the BBC.

These are the first two paragraphs.

Russian forces surrounding the southern port city of Mariupol have destroyed a maternity hospital, Ukraine says.

President Volodymyr Zelensky said children were under the wreckage, and called on Western leaders to impose a no-fly zone.

This Wikipedia entry is entitled Russian–Syrian Hospital Bombing Campaign.

The campaign may have been started by the Syrians, but the Russians joined in later in 2015-2018, as this paragraph from Wikipedia describes.

After Russia began military operations in Syria, aerial bombardment intensified. In 2015, there were more than 300 attacks on medical facilities by Syrian and Russian forces. From May to December 2016, medical facilities were attacked about 200 times by Russian and Syrian forces.

It does look to me, that the Russians consider bombing hospitals to be a legitimate tactic. It is not, as it is a war crime.

March 9, 2022 Posted by | World | , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Hydrogen-Powered Ambulance Drives Into Glasgow Ahead Of London Trial

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on New Atlas.

This is the first paragraph.

Back in February, ULEMCo and industry partners announced plans to design an electric rapid response ambulance for the UK’s NHS Trust that would run on batteries and hydrogen fuel cells. Now, the working prototype has driven into Glasgow to give global leaders attending the UN’s COP26 climate summit a closer look at the technology.

Surely, this is a good application of hydrogen power.

Could they be used in the scenario I proposed in Big London Hospital Was Close To Running Out Of Oxygen?

Hospitals would have an electrolyser, which would produce the following.

  • High grade oxygen for the hospital.
  • Hydrogen to power the vehicles and especially the ambulances.

Note.

  1. There would be no oxygen delivery problems.
  2. The excess hydrogen could be stored to use as an emergency power supply.
  3. Would it improve the air quality by the hospital?

I have checked with the world’s premier electrolyser company; ITM Power of Sheffield and my idea is feasible.

 

November 3, 2021 Posted by | Health, Hydrogen, Transport/Travel | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

A Lump Near My Liver

In A Mysterious Attack On My Body, I explained how I ended up in the Royal London hospital after my hand stopped working, probably due to an infection.

A couple of weeks afterwards my GP called me in to the surgery and repeated the blood tests on my liver, as the first taken in the hospital, weren’t quite what they should be!

These blood tests didn’t show the improvement they should have done, so I went to Homerton Hospital for an ultrasound on my liver.

This didn’t satisfy the GP, so he arranged for a CT-Scan at Homerton hospital.

After the scan, but before the results were known I saw a consultant, who told me about the lump.

He said it could be benign or something nasty and hopefully after he reviews the CT-Scan next week, we’ll know.

He said an endoscopy will probably sort out what it is!

The weird thing, is that, I’m not in any pain.

Except that is, for the lower back pain, I’ve had since I was about twenty.

As I can never sit comfortably in a car and my mother told me, my spine turns the wrong way, that probably explains that.

When I’m working at the computer, about every half-hour, I lie flat on my back on the floor and that seems to sort it.

Why did I get such an odd body?

Any advice gratefully accepted.

July 4, 2021 Posted by | Health | , , | 1 Comment

An Unusual Hospital Appointment

I have just been sent an appointment from the local hospital for a routine echocardiogram.

What is unusual is that the appointment is for 18:40!

I am 73 and I’ve never had an appointment at a hospital outside of the normal working day.

How unusual?

I suppose it’s just that the hospital is catching up on work, delayed by the covids.

February 5, 2021 Posted by | Health | , , | 3 Comments

Nightingale Plan To Keep Hospitals Free From Coronavirus

The title of this post is the same as that of this article on The Times.

This is the introductory paragraph.

Britain’s Nightingale hospitals are being lined up to become the primary centres for treating Covid-19 patients as ministers announced that parts of the NHS would start reopening for routine care from this week.

It’s almost as if we’re going back to the concept of the Victorian fever hospital.

Where I lived in Southgate in North London as a child, the local hospital was Highlands, which was built with several separate blocks, with one for each different fever. It is now upmarket housing in a parkland setting.

T have three memories of treatment at the hospital.

  • In the early 1950s, I had my tonsils out in the hospital, which meant a week’s stay by myself.
  • My mother had her varicose veins treated there, where according to my father the surgeon was a very beautiful Indian lady, who did ward rounds in a sari.
  • The hospital fixed my left humerus, when it was broken by the school bully!

Unfortunately, they didn’t do the best job to fix my arm and it has given me trouble ever since.

April 28, 2020 Posted by | Health | , , | 1 Comment

What Percentage Of People In The UK Survive COVID-19?

This is only a simple analysis based on the COVID-19 statistics published on Sunday, 26th April.

  • So far 152,840 people have been lab confirmed as having COVID-19.
  • There has also been 20,732 deaths in hospitals.
  • Suppose another 25% have died in care homes or in their own bed.
  • That would give a total of 25,915 deaths.
  • So rather crudely, if you get tested positive for COVID-19, you have a 17% chance of dying. What is the chance of dying from a serious stroke or breast cancer?
  • On the other hand 126,925 or 83% have survived.
  • Some, let’s say 20,000 are in ICU beds in hospitals, reducing the figures to 106,925 or 70% that survived.

We should be examining these seventy percent to see why they survived.

The official statistics concentrate on the negative side, but don’t publish figures like how many left hospital for convalescence at home or in an ordinary hospital ward!

Update – 27th April 2020

The actual figure of those in ICU beds yesterday was 18,667, which makes the figures 108, 258 and 71% have survived.

April 26, 2020 Posted by | Health | , , , | 4 Comments

Big London Hospital Was Close To Running Out Of Oxygen

The title of this post is the same as this article on  The Times.

With COVID-19 and all those ventilators and CPAP devices, this sounds like a tragedy about to unfold.

I also remembered a story told to me by a friend, who used to be the Chief Pharmacist at a London hospital.

Oxygen was one of their problems, as the tanks were in a small yard with gates opening on to a busy street, about two hundred metres, away from the hospital.

The problem was that illegal parkers would block the gates, so that delivery couldn’t be made.

Knowing my physics and the reliability of deliveries in parts of London, I thought on-site electrolysis might be a better idea. So I consulted my bible.

There on page 760, it is all described how water can be split into two molecules of hydrogen and one of oxygen by electrolysis.

ITM Power are the experts on electrolysis, so I sent them an e-mail and asked if they could make an electrolyser, that produced oxygen instead of hydrogen.

The reply came swiftly and confirmed, that they could make an electrolyser that supplied oxygen. They also said, that the oxygen was of a high purity.

Just Connect Electricity And Tap Water

All these electrolysers would need is supplies of electricity and tap water to create hydrogen and/or oxygen.

No trucks would be needed to deliver tonnes of liquid gases, which can be rather dangerous to move around city streets.

ITM Power’s hydrogen electrolysers are starting to appear in filling stations, so they can refuel hydrogen-powered vehicles.

One could be installed in a hospital to provide a continuous stream of pure oxygen, which could be piped into the current oxygen delivery system.

What To Do With The Hydrogen

The hydrogen electrolysers produce oxygen as a by-product, which I suspect is just vented to the atmosphere!

But you can’t vent large amounts of hydrogen to the atmosphere, as it is an inflammable gas!

However, you could do either of the following options.

  1. Connect it to a hydrogen fuel pump to refuel hydrogen vehicles.
  2. Inject the hydrogen into the gas main, as is regularly done with hydrogen produced by surplus renewable electricity.

I prefer the first option, as it could mean that health-care could start to use hydrogen-powered ambulances, that are zero carbon and pollution-free.

Perhaps not an appropriate saying for the industry, but it would genuinely kill two birds with one stone.

 

 

 

April 3, 2020 Posted by | Health, Transport/Travel | , , , , , , | 4 Comments