The Anonymous Widower

Battery-Poweed Trams To Beat Congestion

The title of this post is the same as that of an article in today’s copy of The Times.

This is the first two paragraphs.

New tram networks could be rolled out in towns and cities across England under government plans to cut congestion and pollution.

The Department for Transport said that so-called light rail systems could help “reduce dependence on private cars”. A report published yesterday said that trams could carry 20,000 passengers an hour in each direction – about four times more than buses.

It goes on to discuss battery-powered trams and their advantages.

It then discusses the future and says that funding for new tram networks could come from the £2.5billion Transforming Cities Fund.

I’ve been trying to find the report, but it doesn’t appear to be on the Department for Transport web site.

Thanks to Peter, the report is called Light Rail And Other Rapid Transit Solutions In Cities And Towns: Call For Evidence and it is on this page of the Government web site.

February 8, 2019 Posted by | Transport | , | 1 Comment

Has The Canonbury Cross-Over Become More Difficult?

In The Canonbury Cross-Over, I described how it was possible at Canonbury station to change easily from a Westbound train on the North London Line to a Southbound-train on the East London Line.

Services through Canonbury station on the East London Line in trains per hour (tph) are.

  • Four tph between Highbury & Islington and Crystal Palace stations.
  • Four tph between Highbury & Islington and West Croydon stations.

This means that eight tph call in Platform 2 at Canonbury station.

Services through Canonbury station on the North London Line used to be.

  • Four tph between Richmond and Stratford stations.
  • Two tph between Clapham Junction and Stratford stations.

This means that six tph call in Platform 3 at Canonbury station.

Since the December 2018 Timetable Change, two tph have been added to the Clapham Junction service.

So now both services calling at Platform 2/3 have the same frequency of eight tph.

So Why Does The Canonbury Cross-Over Appear To Be More Difficult?

Today, I was coming from Stratford on a Richmond train and was changing to the East London Line to Dalston Junction station, from where I can get a bus from outside the station to my house.

It takes a bit longer, but I was carrying my weekend shopping and as Dalston Junction station has lifts, if you need them and Dalston Kingsland station doesn’t, A lot of passengers, seem to use the Canonbury Cross-Over, when they are going from Stratford to stations on the East London Line.

As my train arrived at Canonbury station, in Platform 3, a Southbound-train was leaving Platform 2. So I had a wait of seven minutes in the rain for the next train to Dalston Junction station.

Since the Timetable Change, it appears that I am having to wait for several minutes a lot more.

Look at these times from the 6th of February. The time is when a train on the North London Line calls in Platform 3 and the integer is the number of minutes before the train calls on the East London Line in Platform 2.

  • 1150 – 7
  • 1157 – 0
  • 1205 – 7
  • 1212 – 0
  • 1220 – 7
  • 1227 – 0
  • 1235 – 7
  • 1242 – 2
  • 1250 – 7
  • 1257 – 0
  • 1305 – 7
  • 1312 – 0
  • 1320 – 7
  • 1327 – 0
  • 1335 – 7
  • 1342 – 0
  • 1353 – 4
  • 1357 – 0
  • 1405 – 7
  • 1312 – 0

In some cases two Southbound trains call between two Westbound ones.

Quite frankly, it’s crap!

Why?

I am no expert on railway timetabling, but if I look at the timetable, it appears that the two trains often seem to be timetabled to arrive at the same time.

As Southbound trains on the East London Line have only come one stop from Highbury & Islington station, are they more likely to be on time, than North London Line trains that have come all the way from Stratford station.

So like today, do North London Line trains arrive after the East London Line train has departed?

Conclusion

The timetable needs to be improved.

Would it be possible to timetable the East London Line trains a couple of minutes after those on the North London Line?

February 8, 2019 Posted by | Transport | , , , , | Leave a comment

The Surprising Reason For London Underground’s New Heritage Signs

The title of this post is the same as that of this article on IanVisits.

This post will be finished, when I get a few pictures.

But in the meantime read Ian’s article.

February 8, 2019 Posted by | Transport | , , | 1 Comment

The Gospel Oak To Barking Line Is Soldiering On

It would appear that this week, the Gospel Oak to Barking Line’s hybrid fleet of five two-car Class 172 trains and one four-car Class 378 train have performed reasonably well.

But there is no good news about the Class 710 trains.

February 8, 2019 Posted by | Transport | , , , | 1 Comment

Drax Becomes First Wood-Burning Power Plant To Capture Carbon

The title of this post is the same as that of this article on the Financial Times.

This news has been treated in a more sensationalist way by other news media and sites, but the FT gives it very straight.

Drax power station is running an experiment, that removes a tonne of carbon dioxide a day.

But that is only the start of the process and most of it is released to the atmosphere.

They are currently, looking for profitable and environmentally-friendly ways of disposal, including selling it to beer manufacturers.

Didn’t we have a carbon-dioxide shortage a few months ago?

 

February 8, 2019 Posted by | World | , , , | Leave a comment

DfT Consulting On Plans To Expand Pay-As-You-Go Rail Travel Nationwide

The total of this post is the same as that of this article on Rail Technology Magazine.

I can’t see what the problem is.

  • My bank card would be linked to my Freedom Pass and Senior Railcard on either a ticketing web site or even better on my on-line bank account.
  • If it were the latter, then when I checked my bank account, as I do regularly, I could also check my travel.
  • I would then just touch in and touch out for each journey.
  • The central computer would then give me the best price for my journey.

As an example, if I went to say Oxford, I would only be charged between the Zone 6 boundary, which is my Freedom Pass limit and Oxford station.

I would not need to buy an extra ticket.

This is all well and good for those with UK bank accounts, but how would it handle other eventualities?

Overseas Visitors

If say one of my overseas friends was in the UK, they would just use a contactless bank card.

If they had a Railcard, as several do, they would register the link on a ticketing web site.

Advance Tickets

These could still be bought on-line or at a booking office as now.

Buses, Taxis and Trams

The system should be extended to buses, taxis, traims and any other future transport systems like cable-cars and pod systems.

Conclusion

It would be a very complicated computer system to program, but most of the work has already been done for London and is working successfully.

It would make the UK’s public transport system one of the most passenger-fruendly in the world.

What would that do for ridership? And tourism?

 

February 8, 2019 Posted by | Transport | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Row Erupts Over Decision To Scrap Glasgow Rail Link For Transport Pods

The title of this post is the same as that of this article on Global Construction Review.

This is the first two paragraphs.

A row has broken out over a decision to cancel a direct rail link between Glasgow Airport and the town of Paisely, just east of Glasgow, in favour of exploring a self-driving transportation pod system.

The direct rail link was announced as part of a £1.1bn investment in the Glasgow City Region deal agreed in 2014 and was expected to be operational by 2025.

I am not sure, which system I prefer, but then I’m a rather different type of airport traveller.

  • I generally travel alone.
  • I rarely have anything more than a man-bag and a small hold-all.
  • I want convenience and can easily walk up to a kilometre with my hold-all.
  • I only fly Ryanair as an airline of last resort.

But what annoys me most, is if to get to the Airport, I have to scratch around buying a ticket for the link from the station to the Airport.

At all London Airports, except Luton, you buy a ticket to the airport station or use a contactless card.

Luton is introducing an automated shuttle between the airport and Luton Airport Parkway station and if it is not free, I’ll never use the airport.

A Tram-Train Rail Link

Edinburgh and Manchester Airports have tram links between the Airport and the City Centre, so I can’t see any problems with a tram-train link, that instead of dropping you on the street in the City Centre, as a tram would do, drops you in a railway station.

The way Manchester is thinking about tram-trains, I wouldn’t be surprised to see them at Manchester Airport.

Based on what I have seen in Sheffield, I don’t believe there would be any serious problems developing a tram-train link to Glasgow Airport..

However, these could be issues.

  • Is there enough spare capacity on the Inverclyde Line?
  • The tram-train link would go to Paisley Gilmore Street and Glasgow Central stations, but what if your local train service to Glasgow goes to Glasgow Queen Street station.

Would many people still use their cars to get to the Airport?

A Pod System

I wrote about the proposed pod system for Glasgow Airport in An Innovative Scheme For A Rail Link To Glasgow Airport.

It has its plus points, but I worry that getting the right number of pods to provide a good service might be tricky.

Would many people still use their cars to get to the Airport?

IThe Connection In Glasgow

Glasgow’s problem is that both these links connect into the centre of Glasgow at Glasgow Central station.

So if your connection to Glasgow comes into Glasgow Queen Street station, you will have to hump your bags across the City Centre.

A plan has existed for years to create Crossrail Glasgow, which would make matters easier.

But nothing has so far been decided.

Conclusion

There is no point in building any form of link to Glasgow Airport, unless Crossrail Glasgow is built.

Otherwise, passengers with an indirect route to Glasgow Central station will still drive or avoid the airport entirely.

 

 

 

February 8, 2019 Posted by | Transport | , , , , | Leave a comment