The Anonymous Widower

London To Glasgow Train Journey Record Bid Fails By Just 21 Seconds

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on ITV.com.

These are the first three paragraphs.

An attempt to break the 36-year-old record for the fastest train journey between London and Glasgow has failed.

Avanti West Coast’s Royal Scot train arrived at Glasgow Central 21 seconds behind the record of three hours, 52 minutes and 40 seconds set by British Rail in December 1984, according to rail expert Mark Smith, who was onboard.

Mr Smith, founder of Seat61.com, wrote on Twitter that a temporary speed limit on the track in Carstairs, South Lanarkshire, “cost us 90 seconds”.

It appears to be a valiant attempt that failed by a small margin.

I have a few thoughts.

The Trains

The British Rail 1984 record was set by an Advanced Passenger Train (APT) and today’s run was by a nine-car Class 390 train.

  • The design speed of the APT was 155 mph and that of a Class 390 train is 140 mph.
  • Service speed of both trains was and is 125 mph.
  • Record speed of the APT was 162 mph and that of a Class 390 train is 145 mph.
  • Both trains employ similar tilt technology to go faster.

At a brief look the performance of these two trains is very similar.

The InterCity 225

The InterCity 225 train is the ringer in this race to the North.

  • The design speed is 140 mph.
  • The service speed is 125 mph
  • The record speed of an InterCity 225 is 161.7 mph.
  • The train doesn’t use tilting technology.
  • The train was built after the APT around 1990.
  • The train holds the record between London Kings Cross and Edinburgh at thirty seconds under three-and-a-half hours.
  • To rub things in, one of these trains, even holds the London Euston and Manchester Piccadilly record.

But there can’t be much wrong with the InterCity 225 trains as a few are being brought back into service, whilst LNER are waiting for ten new bi-mode trains to be delivered.

Hitachi Class 80x Trains

The various variants of Class 800 trains run to Edinburgh and I’m sure they will run to Glasgow.

  • The design speed is 140 mph.
  • The service speed is 125 mph

If an InterCity 225 can go between Edinburgh and London in around three-and-a-half hours, I can’t see why these trains can’t.

Especially, as Hitachi seem to be able to produce versions like the Class 803 and Class 807 trains, which appear to be lighter and more efficient, as they don’t have any diesel engines.

A Small Margin

I said earlier that it was only a small margin between the times of the APT and the Class 390 train. But why was the InterCity 225 able to run between Kings Cross and Edinburgh at thirty seconds under three-and-a-half hours?

This section in the Wikipedia entry for the Class 91 locomotive is entitled Speed Record. This is the first paragraph.

A Class 91, 91010 (now 91110), holds the British locomotive speed record at 161.7 mph (260.2 km/h), set on 17 September 1989, just south of Little Bytham on a test run down Stoke Bank with the DVT leading. Although Class 370s, Class 373s and Class 374s have run faster, all are EMUs which means that the Electra is officially the fastest locomotive in Britain. Another loco (91031, now 91131), hauling five Mk4s and a DVT on a test run, ran between London King’s Cross and Edinburgh Waverley in 3 hours, 29 minutes and 30 seconds on 26 September 1991. This is still the current record. The set covered the route in an average speed of 112.5 mph (181.1 km/h) and reached the full 140 mph (225 km/h) several times during the run.

It looks from the last sentence of this extract, that the record run of the InterCity 225 train ran up to 140 mph in places, whereas the record run of the APT and today’s run by a Class 390 train were limited to 125 mph.

The Signalling

In the Wikipedia entry for the InterCity 225 train, the following is said.

Thus, except on High Speed 1, which is equipped with cab signalling, British signalling does not allow any train, including the InterCity 225, to exceed 125 mph (201 km/h) in regular service, due to the impracticality of correctly observing lineside signals at high speed.

Note.

  1. I have regularly flown my Cessna 340 safely at altitude, with a ground speed of around two hundred miles per hour.
  2. High Speed One has an operating speed of 186 mph.
  3. Grant Schapps, who is Secretary of State for Transport has a pilot’s licence. So he would understand flight instruments and avionics.

So why hasn’t a system been developed in the thirty years since trains capable of running at 140 mph started running in the UK, to allow them to do it?

It is a ridiculous situation.

We are installing full digital ERTMS in-cab signalling on the East Coast Main Line, but surely a system based on aviation technology could be developed until ERTMS  is ready. Or we could install the same system as on High Speed One.

After all, all we need is a system, to make sure the drivers don’t misread the signals.

But then the EU says that all member nations must use ERTMS signalling.

Didn’t we just leave the EU?

Conclusion

By developing our own in-cab digital signalling we could run trains between London and Scotland in around three-and-a-half hours.

The Japanese could even have an off-the-shelf system!

ERTMS sounds like a closed shop to give work to big European companies, who have lobbied the European Commission.

June 17, 2021 Posted by | Transport | , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Crossrail’s First Inclined Lift Is Now Available To View!

The entrance to Crossrail in front of Broadgate has now had most of its hoarding removed.

You can now walk around it and view the escalators and inclined lift, that will take passengers to and from the booking hall.

It’s probably the most up-market fosterito, that I’ve seen so far. Even more so, than the pair at Tottenham Court Road station, that I wrote about in Tottenham Court Road Station Gains A Giant Fosterito.

  • It has three escalators and an inclined lift.
  • It oozes quality with lots of steel, glass and quality lighting.
  • It shows the arms of the City of London in recognition to their contribution to Crossrail.
  • It sits in the middle of a large traffic-free square.

WilkinsonEyre were the architects.

Fosteritos

Norman Foster faced a similar problem in Spain of how to protect staircases and escalators emerging from the Bilbao Metro.

These pictures show his elegant solution.

The Spaniards obviously liked them, as they called them fosteritos.

June 17, 2021 Posted by | Transport | , , , | 2 Comments

Ilford Station – 9th June 2021

The third entrance on the South side of Ilford station is now open.

These pictures were taken during a walk from the North entrance to the new one in the South.

Note that nine-car trains are now running on Crossrail.

June 17, 2021 Posted by | Transport | , | Leave a comment

Did Gareth Bale Learn A Few Tricks From Tommy Harmer?

Tommy Harmer wasn’t a famous footballer to many, but to those, like me, who saw him play for Spurs in the 1950s, he was recognised as one of the most skilful ball-players of the time.

The second goal scored by Wales yesterday, was certainly a repeat of quite a few, I saw scored by Spurs in the 1950s, with Gareth Bale standing in for Harmer.

Harmer would accept a very short corner and with the ball glued to his feet, he’d advance slowly up the line towards the goal.

There was usually one of three outcomes.

  • Harmer was able to pull the ball back to someone like Bobby Smith, who hit it first time towards goal from just outside the six-yard box. Last night Connor Roberts played Smith to perfection to score  from Bale’s pullback.
  • Harmer was tackled and he got another corner, from which he sometimes repeated the dose.
  • In some cases, the inevitable happened and Harmer was fouled inside the penalty area. And who scored from the penalty spot? – Harmer of course!

He was one of the best penalty takers I’ve ever seen, Wikipedia says this of his penalties.

Sublime unstoppable penalties, tucked into the side netting behind an upright.

Some would probably be illegal these days, as he sometimes waited until the goalkeeper moved. More fool the keeper!

Did Bale And Harmer Ever Meet?

Tommy Harmer sadly died in 2017, but on Radio 5, it was said around 2014, that he was working as a meeter-and-greeter at White Hart Lane and had been for some time.

So I suspect that someone at the club could have introduced the two players to each other, during Bale’s first spell at the club between 2007 and 2013. They would have made an odd pair, with a height difference of seven inches.

And of course, I suspect Spurs have a few videos of Harmer.

In many years of watching football, I haven’t seen this method of taking a corner used since those days in the 1950s, by Harmer.

I suspect Gareth Bale has changed all that! Wales got a goal, but Bale was also using it as a way to run down the clock!

June 17, 2021 Posted by | Sport | , , , , , | 1 Comment

Crossrail Doubles Trial Running Frequency

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on IanVisits.

Enough said! But read the article and watch the video it contains.

June 17, 2021 Posted by | Transport | | Leave a comment

Crossrail’s Inclined Lifts

This page on variably, shows the inclined lifts on Crossrail, at Liverpool Street station.

Take a look, as they are impressive. To my built-in video camera with an enormous instant-access store, they look like modern versions of the first inclined lift, I ever saw, which was on the Stockholm Metro.

If I remember correctly, the Swedish one was installed on if not an Angel-sized set of escalators, certainly one of a good length.

It looks like it was at Duvbo station.

Enjoy the video.

It’s not this set of escalators at Duvbo, as it is the other way round, but it certainly is very similar.

Are they available in bronze for the Northern reaches of the Piccadilly Line, where I suggested inclined lifts for step-free access in Thoughts On Step-Free Access At Manor House Station.

One could be built in like this short one at Greenford station.

I shall replace this picture with a better one.

June 17, 2021 Posted by | Transport | , , , , , , | Leave a comment