The Anonymous Widower

Renault Scenic Vision Concept Debuts As Hydrogen Fuel Cell Range Extender

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Inside EVs.

This is the subtitle to the article.

The French automaker is repurposing its Scenic nameplate for a very different vehicle.

The car looks fairly conventional, but the power system is not.

This paragraph describes it.

What’s perhaps more interesting than the styling is what powers this study. The 215-horsepower front-mounted electric motor is taken from the new Megane E-Tech, as is the 40 kWh battery pack (the smaller of the two available for the Megane EV). The battery pack is small because this vehicle also has an on-board power source, in the form of a 16 kW hydrogen fuel cell.

Note.

  1. 215 horse power is 160 kW.
  2. Is it significant that that motor is ten times as powerful as the fuel-cell?

The rest of the article, describes the construction of the car, which includes a lot of recycled plastic.

Another article on the car, indicates a range of 500 miles.

Incidentally, I never owned a French car, although my father did own a couple of Amilcars before World War 2. From one picture I saw, he might have had an Amilcar CGS. This car featured in Mousieur Hulot’s Holiday and I can remember a clip of the film appearing on television and my father remarking that the car was an Amilcar. I can also remember him telling the story of Isadora Duncan’s death, which involved an Amilcar.

My father had some surprising friends in the 1920s, 1930s and 1940s.

May 20, 2022 Posted by | Hydrogen, Transport/Travel | , , | 2 Comments

UK Energy Exports To Europe At Record High

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on The Times.

This is the first two paragraphs.

Britain has exported record amounts of gas to Europe so far this year as its liquefied natural gas terminals receive shipments destined for the Continent.

Electricity exports also have surged to unprecedented highs in recent weeks after an unexpected glut of gas pushed down short-term gas prices and resulted in gas-fired power plants generating more for export.

Who’d have thought it, that all those gas pipelines and electricity interconnectors between the UK and the Continent of Europe would be part of the replacementliqui for Russian gas.

According to Wikipedia, we have three liquified natural gas terminals; two at Milford Haven; South Hook and Dragon, and Grain on the Isle of Grain.

Note.

  1. South Hook is Europe’s largest liquified natural gas terminal and is owned by a partnership of the Qataris, ExxonMobil and Elf.
  2. South Hook and Dragon together can provide 25 % of the UK’s natural gas needs.
  3. Grain is owned by National Grid and according to Wikipedia, is in terms of storage capacity it is the largest LNG facility in Europe and the eighth largest in the world.
  4. Grain can supply 20 % of the UK’s natural gas needs.
  5. Grain has a reloading facility, so that gas can be exported.
  6. Grain seems to be continually expanding.
  7. Both Milford Haven and the Isle of Grain have large gas-fired power-stations.

Politicians say we don’t have enough gas storage, but we do seem to have world-class LNG terminals.

I have a couple of extra thoughts.

Blending Natural Gas With Hydrogen

HyDeploy is a project investigated blending hydrogen natural gas to cut carbon emissions. The project is described in this post called HyDeploy.

Surely, these terminals could be places, where hydrogen is blended with our natural gas supply.

  • The terminals are connected to the UK gas network.
  • Both Milford Haven and the Isle of Grain should have access to large amounts of offshore wind energy in the next few years, which could be used to generate green hydrogen.
  • The terminals would need electrolysers to generate the hydrogen.

The Isle of Grain already has a blending capability.

NeuConnect

NeuConnect is an under-development interconnector between the Isle of Grain in Kent and Wilhelmshaven in Germany.

  • It will have a capacity 1.4 GW.
  • All the planning permissions seem to be in place.
  • Prysmian have won a € 1.2 million contract to deliver the interconnector.
  • Arup and German engineering firm Fichtner have formed a joint venture to provide project services for the interconnector.
  • Construction could start this year.

It looks like the Germans will be replacing some of Putin’s bloodstained gas with clean zero-carbon energy from the UK.

Should We Develop More Gas Fields?

There are some gas fields in the seas around the UK, like Jackdaw, that could be developed.

Suppose, we extracted the gas and sent it to the reloading terminal on the Isle of Grain through the gas transmission network, where it could be exported by ship, to the Continent.

The UK would not be increasing its carbon emissions, as that would surely be the responsibility of the end-user.

Should We Develop More Gas Fired Power-Stations?

I believe it is possible to develop carbon-capture technology for gas-fired power stations.

The carbon dioxide would be either used in a beneficial way or stored in perhaps a worked-out gas field under the North Sea.

So long as no carbon dioxide is released into the atmosphere, I don’t see why more gas-fired power stations shouldn’t be developed.

What is happening at Keadby near Scunthorpe would appear to be one model for zero-carbon power generation.

Keadby Power Station

 

This is an existing

Conclusion

We will be exporting more energy to the Continent.

May 20, 2022 Posted by | Energy, Energy Storage, Hydrogen | , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Gravitricity And Arup Secure Funding To Develop Below Ground Hydrogen Storage

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Offshore Energy.

This is the first paragraph.

Edinburgh-based storage tech firm Gravitricity and British environment consultancy Arup have secured $372,073 (£300,000) from the UK government to study the feasibility of storing hydrogen in purpose-built underground shafts.

The biggest thing about this grant is that it has gone to Scottish start-up; Gravitricity and one of the UK’s most respected engineering consultancy companies; Arup, who have over 16,000 staff in their world-wide operation.

For Gravitricity, it is the sort of deal, that could make this small company.

It follows their link up with world-class Dutch winch specialist Huisman, who provide the winches they need.

If you judge a company, by their friends, Gravitricity now have two of the biggest and best.

This paragraph described the objectives of the study.

The parties will collaborate to deliver a complete system design and commercial feasibility report for the new idea, as well as identify a potential site for their underground hydrogen store. The design will also include integration with gravity energy storage and inter-seasonal heat.

This could turn out to be one of the most significant energy storage announcements of 2022.

Conclusion

I am not disappointed that I invested a small sum in Gravitricity through a crowd funding.

May 20, 2022 Posted by | Energy Storage, Hydrogen | , , | Leave a comment