The Anonymous Widower

The Return Of The Best Gluten-Free Sandwich From A Supermarket

Marks and Spencer do very good gluten-free  sandwiches. In my experience, the only better gluten-free sandwiches I have had, have been in a couple of dedicated gluten-free shops, where the sandwich has been made in front of me.

This was my lunch today, bassed on a gluten-free egg sandwich, that has been brought back after about five years.

Incidentally, I suspect that egg seems to have a complimentary taste with good gluten-free bread.

I’ve also had excellent gluten-free egg sandwiches in several places including the Tate Britain, Tate Modern and Cafe Northcote in Blackburn cathedral.

January 8, 2018 Posted by | Food | , , , , | Leave a comment

Baked Eggs And Sardines

This recipe came out of Saturday’s Times and explains the tins of sardines and bread earlier. When I saw the recipe, I thought I hadn’t had sardines for years, so this recipe  seemed a good one to rectify that omission.

Baked Eggs And Sardines

Baked Eggs And Sardines

All I did was put a crushed clove of garlic, a complete tin of sardines in tomato sauce and two eggs into a buttered ovenproof dish, which then went in the oven at 180°C, until the eggs looked cooked.

I did buy some parsley to chop on the top, but I forgot to do it.

I shall be cooking it again! Especially as sardines are suposedly nutritious and considered by some to be an aphrodisiac. The dish is also so easy to cook.  The most difficult thing was opening the tin of sardines!

Even the washing up was fairly minimal!

April 22, 2013 Posted by | Food | , , , | 3 Comments

Have The Sale Of Eggs Benedict Declined With The Change Of Pope?

I often have Eggs Benedict for brunch on Sunday, as I did today.  Hence my question!

Wikipedia gives a couple of explanations for the name of the dish.  I like this one.

In the early eighteenth century Pope Benedict XIII was so fond of a particular egg dish, that he requested it very often. It is also believed that Benedict XIII had an illness which contributed to his desire for the egg dish.

I seem to be a bit addicted to eggs and always have been.

March 17, 2013 Posted by | Food | , | Leave a comment

A Problem For A Jewish Coeliac

Now I’m not Jewish, although I’m suspicious that my coeliac disease comes from an Ashkenazi Jewish line from my great-great-great-grandfather who came over to work in the fur-trade at the start of the nineteenth century.

I do like to have eggs for breakfast and if I cook them at home, I will generally have them with beans and bacon. Today, though, I was on the way to IKEA via the Angel, so I popped into Carluccio’s.  Usually, in such a situation, I have eggs florentine with a portion of pancetta. The pancetta is a great way to mop up the sauce and the yolk from the poached eggs.

I suppose if you are Jewish, you could accept the offer of Scottish gluten-free oatcakes. The oatcakes are fine, but they are a bit hearty for breakfast.

November 24, 2012 Posted by | Food | , , , | Leave a comment

Not Very Non-Stick

The one-egg poachers have one problem.

They’re a devil to get clean.

November 14, 2012 Posted by | Food | , | Leave a comment

Poached Smoked Haddock With Poached Eggs

After my experience at the Hope Street Hotel in Liverpool, I thought I’d try to do this myself. I asked an honourable friend how to poach the fish and she suggested using the microwave. I then found this method on Yahoo.

If you don’t want to spend ages with the other recipes just put it in a shallow dish with a little milk and water (equal amounts) and a knob of butter on top then whack it into the microwave for three/mins full power.

Here’s what it looked like before it went in the microwave.

Smoked Haddock Before Cooking

And here it is after the cooking.

Smoked Haddock After Cooking

To poach the eggs, I used these mini-poachers from John Lewis.

Mini-Poachers From John Lewis

Here they are sitting in the pan.

Two Eggs Poaching

They can either sit or hang on the side. The eggs didn’t turn out of the poachers too well.

Poached Smoked Haddock and Poached Eggs

But they tasted alright and I suspect I’ll get them better next time.

By the way it looks like John Lewis is out of the mini egg poachers. Perhaps a lot of mothers are going to get them for Christmas. After all they only cost four pounds each.

November 13, 2012 Posted by | Food | , , , | 8 Comments

Baked Eggs With Tomatoes

I’ve done this recipe for years, but in the move the book with it in has got lost.

  1. Well butter four ramekin dishes.
  2. Preheat the oven to 200°C
  3. Take a large tin of chopped tomatoes and put in a saucepan with a a finely chopped medium-sized onion. Mix well and heat.
  4. When it is hot, simmer and add two tablespoons of flour mixed with enough butter to make a nice paste.
  5. Simmer for five minutes or so, adding a teaspoon of sugar and salt and pepper until you get the  taste right.
  6. Spoon the mixture into the ramekin dishes, making a nest in the top of the mixture.
  7. Add an egg to the nest and cover with grated cheese.
  8. Bake in the oven until the cheese is cooked.

With practice they can be got to rise like mini-soufflés.

In some ways the great thing about this recipe, is that apart from the eggs nothing has a sell-by date. Usually I have everything required in my fridge and/or store cupboard.

October 30, 2012 Posted by | Food | , | 1 Comment

I Can Only Take So Much Lettuce

For lunch today, I had some smoked salmon and one of Waitrose’s potato and egg side salads.  I don’t eat all the lettuce, but all the others bits like tomatoes and cucumber do get devoured.

So why do we put so much lettuce in a salad? Perhaps, it’s to feed our pet rabbits? I don’t have one!

August 7, 2012 Posted by | Food | , , , | Leave a comment

Barry’s Gluten Free Muffins

Barry, the chef in my local pub, the Northgate Arms in Southgate Road, is a coeliac, so he knows his gluten-free well.

As today, it was raining when I got my paper from next door to the pub, I popped in for a drink. They were offering a Brunch Menu, which contained Eggs Royale, which is a poached egg on top of smoked salmon and a muffin.

I decided to have one, whilst I read the paper with a drink.

For me, instead of a muffin, Barry grilled a slice of aubergine, added a slice of a large tomato and some spinach to the top as a delicious substitute.

June 18, 2011 Posted by | Food | , | 2 Comments

Asparagus Egg Dippers with Smoked Salmon

I’ve eaten in some very good restaurants in my time, although these days I tend to like to cook myself, as I like the thrill of creating something. But I’ve never eaten in Heston Blumenthal ‘s, Fat Duck, as I feel that his eclectic taste and ideas may not fit with being a coeliac.

So today, as I had some spare asparagus and I was going to Waitrose, I made sure that I had the basics for this recipe of Heston Blumenthal’s that the supermarket is promoting.

It was very simple and all it required was :-

  • 250g of asparagus
  • 1 tbsp of grapeseed oil – I’m not as posh as Heston thinks he is, so I used some good olive oil.
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper.
  • 100g of smoked salmon – I used some from Pinney’s of Orford.
  • 2 medium eggs although I think mine were large ones – Interestingly, I buy them in fours from Waitrose, which is a very sensible number for someone living alone.

The method is as follows.

  1. Remove the woody part of the asparagus stems by gently snapping off the ends (they should break naturally) – I’d never have thought of snapping them, so at least it saved a knife from the washing up.
  2.  Coat the bottom of a frying pan with the oil then add the asparagus, season with salt and freshly ground black pepper, and cover with a lid. Place the pan over a medium heat for approximately 5 minutes, or until the asparagus spears are cooked but still a vibrant green. Remove the pan from the heat and place the asparagus on kitchen paper to remove any excess oil – I actually tasted some after thy had been cooked and they were good.
  3. Cover a chopping board with a layer of clingfilm. Put the salmon slices on top in a single layer, then lay another layer of clingfilm over the top. Using a rolling pin, flatten the salmon so it becomes uniform in thickness. Remove the clingfilm, cut the salmon into strips and use to wrap each spear, leaving the top sticking out, and a few centimetres showing at the base – This was far too complicated and I can’t separate clingfilm with my hands, so I just separaed the smoked salmon and cut it into strips. It wasn’t too difficult and I’ll do it better next time.
  4. Using the smallest possible pan, just cover the eggs in cold water, and cover the pan. Bring to the boil quickly, over a high heat. Once boiling, remove from heat and leave to stand, still covered, for 6 minutes – I’d never have thought of boiling eggs in this way.
  5.  After 6 minutes, remove the eggs from the pan and place them in egg cups. Crack the top of each egg with a spoon and remove the top. To serve, dip the salmon-wrapped asparagus spears into the soft egg yolk.

I actually opened the eggs as I always have by battering them with the bowl of a teaspoon and then peeling off the shell with the handle of the spoon.

I also put a hole in the bottom of the shell, so that witches can’t use them to sail away on the sea.

They were very good and a wonderful combination of three of my favourite foods; asparagus, eggs and smoked salmon.

They’re gluten-free too!

It gave me a lot of satisfaction to do this recipe.  I also learned several simple techniques, that work well.

So perhaps the success of his cooking is lots of simple ideas, brilliantly executed.

May 15, 2011 Posted by | Food | , , | 1 Comment