The Anonymous Widower

CoolRail To Cut Carbon Footprint Of Fresh Food

The title of this post is the same as that of this article on Railway Gazette International.

These first two paragraphs outline the plan.

Food logistics company Euro Pool System has launched a thrice-weekly CoolRail dedicated temperature-controlled service to transport fresh produce between Valencia in Spain and Rotterdam in the Netherlands.

This is intended to be first route of planned network of CoolRail services which would link Spain with Germany, Scandinavia and the UK.

I can see this method of fresh food transportation growing, especially as CoolRail claim it is as fast as by road and cuts CO2 emissions by 70 to 90 %.

It also appears that the UK through the Channel Tunnel is in CoolRail’s plans.

Fish, Lamb And Beef To Europe

The obvious British export, that could use the service the other way to Europe is probably fish, as a large proportion of UK-landed fish goes to Europe at the present time.

This page on the Seafish web site, gives details about fish imports and exports.

Quality meat, like Welsh lamb and Scottish beef could also be sent to Europe, after being slaughtered in the UK.

What About Quality Food And Drink?

This page on the Scotch Whisky Association web site is entitled Scotch Whisky Exports On The Up in 2018.

This is two paragraphs from the page.

In 2018, the export value of Scotch Whisky grew +7.8% by value, to a record £4.70bn. The number of 70cl bottles exported also reached record levels growing to the equivalent of 1.28bn, up +3.6%.

The United States became the first billion pound export market for Scotch Whisky, growing to £1.04bn last year. The EU remains the largest region for exports, accounting for 30% of global value and 36% of global volume.

That means that Scotland exported to the EU, the equivalent of 461 million bottles of whisky, that is worth around £1.41billion.

A twenty-foot shipping container has a volume of 33.2 cubic metres., so with allowance for packaging, one could probably hold 33,200 bottles worth about £100,000.

To accommodate all Scotch Whisky exports to Europe on the 2018 figures, would need 14,000 containers per year or a very civilised thirty-eight containers a day.

Conclusion

There’s certainly a large market for food transport by rail across Europe and to the UK, some of which will be in containers with refrigeration and some without!

 

May 28, 2019 Posted by | Food, Transport | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Bad Logic From Marks And Spencer

I am not the largest of individuals being around one metre seventy and sixty-one kilos.

But then many coeliacs are on the smallish side.

So when I saw this small meal which was entiled Beef Chilli & Cheese Filled Jacket Potato, I suspected that it could be gluten-free, as it seems most of Marks and Spencer’s beef chillis are made without gluten.

On turning the packet over, I found my reasoning was correct, as the dreaded g-word was missing.

Next to this baked potato on the shelf, was a Smoked Haddock Mornay Filled Jacket Potato.

Now this is where the logic is bad

  • Some of their fish dishes with a Mornay sauce are gluten-free and others are not. This was one of the ones with gluten!
  • Surely, if all chillis can be gluten-free, then all fish Mornays should be the same as to gluten.
  • Perhaps, all baked potato dishes like this should also be the same as to gluten.
  • I also think that with fish, shepherds and cottage pies with a potato topping, whether a pie is gluten-free or not depends on the range.
  • And with sausages and burgers, they are all gluten-free.

If you are vegan or need to be dairy-free, I’m certain there are other examples of similar products varying as to acceptability.

How Was The Eating?

Not bad at all! I’ll try another, but I would love to try the smoked haddock variety!

Conclusion

I believe that a regular shopper in a particular supermarket chain, should be able to ascertain, if a product is suitable by just reading the title. They can always check by reading the detailed labelling

 

November 10, 2018 Posted by | Food | , , , | Leave a comment

Fish Fingers Surprisingly Sustainable, Say Conservationists

The title of this post is the same as that of this article on the BBC.

When I first saw this headline, I was surprised and cynically felt that this was some put up job paid for by the producers of fish fingers or the Fish Fingers Appreciation Society.

But it appears that the research was done by the Marine Conservation Society.

This is the first paragraph of their Wikipedia entry.

The Marine Conservation Society (MCS) is the UK’s leading marine environment, not-for-profit organisation. It works for the increased protection of the seas around the United Kingdom, via the creation of well managed marine protected areas. It works with fishermen and industry to find more sustainable ways of fishing and with retailers and consumers to buy and choose more sustainable seafood. It involves volunteers to carry out hundreds of beach cleans and surveys annually whilst also working with water companies and local communities to ensure UK bathing waters are of an excellent standard

I think that and other facts in the entry, prove that we can take the BBC report at face value.

Incidentally of their list of the top fifteen fish fingers rated for sustainability, at least two were gluten-free.

Usually, coeliacs and others who are gluten-free are left out of the results.

My last thought, is that why if we can make fish fingers surprisingly sustainable, can’t we do that for other foods?

November 2, 2018 Posted by | Food | , , | Leave a comment

A Quick Fish Pie Supper

I like fish pies and there are several entries for fish pie. If I have time, I will cook my version of Jamie Oliver’s Fish Pie.

But today, I found a new gluten-free fish pie in Marks and Spencer, so I had to try it.

I cooked it in the microwave and it was of a very different type to Jamie’s, being creamy rather than having a good proportion of vegetables. Although, both have a potato topping, rather than a pastry pie-crust.

It was well-worth buying, cooking and eating, at a cost of £3.80 for one.

Note the tomato sauce in the pictures. I’ve found some very dodgy fish pies and cooked some of my own, in my time, that needed it.

This one certainly did not!

Next time, I’ll cook it in the oven, although I think both methods will work, but you may get a different texture of pie.

March 15, 2018 Posted by | Food | , , , | 4 Comments

How To Cook Gluten-Free Fish

As a coeliac, I get fed up with restaurants, who can’t cook fish in a simple gluten-free way.

On my trip to Sufbury, which I wrote about in Marks Tey Station And The Sudbury Branch, I needed to eat something.

I did find my usual stand-by of a Pizza Express, but felt that I might be better to wait until I got back to London and buy a gluten-free wrap or sandwich in Liverpool Street station.

I then came across the Codfather, which had a sign saying they did gluten-free fish and chips on Sunday.

The waitress said they could do me a plain grilled fish with new potatoes and vegetables, which I had.

It was excellent and I can heartily recommend the Codfather in Sudbury.

I can’t understand, why more restaurants, don’t use this simple method to satisfy, those like me, who need gluten-free food.

On BBC Breakfast this morning, there is a story about problems in our seaside resorts.

How many of them have a restaurant that sells gluten-free fish lunches and inners  to the standard of the Codfather or Kubicki in Gdansk?

A quick search has found decent places in Brighton, Hastings and Blackpool, but others places don’t seem so well served.

 

 

 

July 11, 2016 Posted by | Food | , , | Leave a comment

Serial Cooking – Lemon And Spinach Cod Gratin

This recipe is another from Lindsey Bareham in The Times.

Lindsey called it a speedy gratin, based on an idea from a reader.

I made it as one large one for two helpings for myself.

February 19, 2016 Posted by | Food | , , | Leave a comment

Serial Cooking – Smoked Haddock And Curried Rice

This recipe is another from Lindsey Bareham in The Times.

Lindsey called this an incredibly lazy twist on kedgeree. I have tried to make it even lazier.

Note.

  1. I started with a single Marks and Spencer’s smoked haddock. Just two pounds and no bones or skin.
  2. I hard-boiled an extra egg for the fridge
  3. I used an onion instead of shallots.
  4. I didn’t have any fresh chives or coriander

I rather liked it for a New Year’s Eve supper.

December 31, 2015 Posted by | Food | , , | Leave a comment

Cinty’s Fish Pie With Celia

Cinty’s fish pie is excellent and goes down well with a beer.

Cinty's Fish Pie With Celia

Cinty’s Fish Pie With Celia

I made two and the other kept in the fridge for a couple of days.

December 15, 2015 Posted by | Food | , | Leave a comment

Serial Cooking – A Simple Kedgeree

This simple kedgeree comes from Lindsey Bareham in The Times.

It was one of the best meals that I’ve cooked serially.

I only ate half and will pack the rest for my trip to Rotherham on Saturday.

February 3, 2015 Posted by | Food | , , | Leave a comment

Gluten-Free Wednesday

The reason I went to Haverstock Hill was not to see the dreadful eyesores, but as it was Wednesday, it was to have gluten-free fish and chips at Oliver’s.

It was a very worthwhile trip and with the exception of some fish and chips at Rick Stein’s in Padstow, which cost probably a lot more, it was the best I’ve eaten. In some ways that is an unfair comparison, as in Cornwall I was with C. And then for many years before I was diagnosed as a coeliac, I never ate battered fish. Something was probably telling me, it was poisoning my gut.

But the plaice and chips today was superb. C hated chips, but she’d have loved these. There can be no better accolade!

December 31, 2014 Posted by | Food | , | 1 Comment