The Anonymous Widower

Record Levels Of Lithium In Geothermal Water At United Downs Project

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Think Geoenergy.

This paragraph explains it all.

Geothermal Engineering Ltd (GEL), the company behind the UK’s first deep geothermal electricity power plant, is today announcing record levels of lithium in its geothermal waters. Recent, third party tests have revealed that there are more than 250 milligrams per litre (‘mg/L’) in the fluid which is the highest concentration ever discovered in geothermal fluids anywhere in the world.

The article also says.

  • The magnesium levels are low, which eases processing.
  • Up to four thousand tonnes of lithium could be produced per year locally.

The article is certainly worth a read.

August 14, 2021 Posted by | Energy, World | , , , | Leave a comment

Ecotricity Seals 10-year Agreement To Take Geothermal Power From Cornish Plant

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Energy Live News.

This is the first two paragraphs

British utility Ecotricity has sealed a power purchase agreement (PPA) to buy geothermal electricity from Geothermal Engineering Limited.

The ten-year PPA will see a minimum of 3MWh of baseload electricity produced by the United Downs demonstration project in Cornwall being distributed to power the equivalent of 10,000 homes every year.

The article also says that this is the first time geothermal electricity has been produced and sold in the UK.

The remarkable thing, is that the same site will be used by Cornish Lithium for a pilot plant to extract lithium.

It does look like the Cornish will both have their cake and eat it!

As rum is also going to be matured using more of the energy, as I wrote about in And Now Geothermal Rum From Cornwall!, they’ll also be able to drink it as well!

January 7, 2021 Posted by | Energy | , , , , , | 2 Comments

And Now Geothermal Rum From Cornwall!

This article on ThinkGeoenergy is entitled New Project To Bring You “Tropically” Matured Rum From Cornwall’s Geothermal Heartland.

This is the introductory paragraph.

What a product addition to the United Downs Deep Geothermal Project? Distillery startup Cornish Geothermal Distillery Company is pushing forward with plans to produce “tropically” mature rum using heat from the UK’s first geothermal power facility.

The Cornish Geothermal Distillery Company has a web site for more information.

This is a paragraph from the Think Geoenergy article.

In the release shared with us it is reported that Matthew Clifford, founder of the Cornish Geothermal Distillery Company (CGDC), has submitted outline plans for an ultra high-tech biome which would incorporate his patent-pending, carbon-neutral rum “cask maturation pods” designed by Grimshaw Architects alongside Buro Happold – globally recognised for innovative architecture that respects the planet’s resources whilst being functional and awe inspiring.

It seems to be an ambitious carbon-neutral project that could create up to a hundred jobs.

November 16, 2020 Posted by | Energy, Food | , , , , | 3 Comments

Preliminary Sampling Indicate Significant Lithium Grades In Geothermal Waters At United Downs Project, Cornwall

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Think Geoenergy.

This is the introductory paragraph.

Cornish Lithium releases announcement on finding “globally significant” lithium grades in geothermal waters at the United Downs Deep Geothermal Power Project in Cornwall, UK and is now preparing for work on a pilot plant.

The article gives a full explanation.

There is more on this press release on the Cornish Lithium web site.

September 18, 2020 Posted by | Business, Energy Storage | , , | Leave a comment

Government Funding For Lithium Recovery From Geothermal At United Downs Project

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Think Geoenergy.

This is the sub heading.

A demonstration project to produce Lithium from geothermal brines at the United Downs Deep Geothermal Project in Cornwall, UK has received government funding.

This is certainly, an idea to watch.

The company behind the project is Cornish Lithium, that I wrote about in How To Go Mining In A Museum.

August 6, 2020 Posted by | Energy | , , , | Leave a comment

United Downs Deep Geothermal Project Confident On Potential Power Generation

The title of this post is the same as that of this article on ThinkGeoenergy.

This is the first paragraph.

With initial tests of the well drilled, the United Downs Deep Geothermal Project (UDDGP) suggests that the project will be able to generate electricity of as much as 3 MW in power generation capacity.

Two holes have been bored to a depth of 5 km.

If the project is successful, up to three MW of heat could be brought to the surface, which can be used to generate electricity or heat buildings.

A Look At Possible Costs

This page on Wikipedia is entitled Cost Of Electricity By Source.

It gives these for the capital cost of power stations for various zero-carbon energy sources.

  • onshore wind – $1600/kW
  • offshore wind – $6500/kW
  • solar PV (fixed) – $1060/kW (utility) $1800/kW
  • solar PV (tracking)- $1130/kW (utility) $2000/k
  • battery storage power – $2000/kW
  • conventional hydropower – $2680/kW
  • geothermal – $2800/kW

Geothermal has one big advantage over wind and solar power in that it is a continuous power source like nuclear, hydropower and some fossil fuels, so it doesn’t need to be backed by energy storage.

 

September 15, 2019 Posted by | World | , , | Leave a comment

Government Has ‘Double Standards’ For Allowing Drilling In Devon

The title of this post is the same as that of this article in The Telegraph.

This is the first paragraph.

The Government has been accused of “blatant double standards” for allowing drilling in Cornwall that is able to cause stronger tremors than fracking.

This is at the United Downs Geothermal Project in Devon.

It certainly looks like one rule for geothermal energy and another for fracking.

But then in a lecture in London, I heard a Professor of Engineering from Glasgow University, say that fracking was used in the Highlands of Scotland to obtain clean water.

May 5, 2019 Posted by | World | , , , | Leave a comment

Drilling Starts For ‘Hot Rocks’ Power In Cornwall

The title of this post is the same as that of this article on the BBC.

For as long as I can remember, there have been plans to tap the ‘hot rocks’ under Cornwall for heat and convert it into electricity.

Geothermal power is used in many places around the world.

The Wikipedia entry is worth a read and the Utility-Grade Stations section has this paragraph.

The largest group of geothermal power plants in the world is located at The Geysers, a geothermal field in California, United States. As of 2004, five countries (El Salvador, Kenya, the Philippines, Iceland, and Costa Rica) generate more than 15% of their electricity from geothermal sources.

This is also said.

Enhanced geothermal systems that are several kilometres in depth are operational in France and Germany and are being developed or evaluated in at least four other countries.

As the Cornish project appears to have a degree of EU funding, it looks like Cornwall is one of the four other countries.

The BBC also had a report on the Cornish drilling this morning. They made a point to say that this project has nothing to do with fracking.

Fracking is an emotive project, but we seem to forget that a lot of the engineering and drilling techniques used in the process are also used in other applications, like obtaining fresh water and drilling very deep holes, as is proposed in Cornwall.

It is also enlightening to look at this Wikipedia entry, which describes geothermal power in Germany.

This is said about the sustainability of the power source in Germany.

n the same year (2003) the TAB (bureau for technological impact assessment of the German Bundestag) concluded that Germany’s geothermal resources could be used to supply the entire base load of the country. This conclusion has regard to the fact that geothermal sources have to be developed sustainably because they can cool out if overused.

Based on this, I can understand the enthusiasm for using the technique in Cornwall.

On the BBC this morning, it was said that the Cornish borehole could produce enough electricity for 3,000 homes.

A page on the OVO Energy website, says this.

Household electricity use in the UK dropped under 4,000kWh for the first time in decades in 2014. At an average of 3,940kWh per home, this was about 20% higher than the global average for electrified homes of 3,370kWh.

At 4,000 kWh a year, a home would use an average of 0.46 kW per hour.

This means that to run 3,000 houses needs 1.4 MW per hour.

A typical price of a kWh of electricity is thirteen pence excluding VAT, which means that this plant could earn around £178 per hour or £1.6million a year.

A Project Video

Access the project video here.

Conclusion

I feel that geothermal power could have a promising future in Cornwall.

 

 

 

 

 

November 6, 2018 Posted by | World | , , , | 3 Comments

Geothermal Power And The New Island Of Surtsey

I was on a tour which was called the South Shore Safari. The first real stop was in an area of geothermal power stations, which gave good views of the new island of Surtsey

I can remember the formation of the island of Surtsey being shown on the television in 1963. It was a well-reported news story of the time.

Geothermal power is important in Iceland and contributes nearly 600 MW of electricity, which makes up about thirty percent of what they need. The Icelanders have by no means fully developed the maximum amount of power available, but they do generate a lot of hot water to heat Reykjavik and other towns. For comparison, our large nuclear power station, Sizewell B generates 1,200 MW.

I think the geothermal power station we saw is Nesjavellir. Wikipedia says this about the capacity of the power station.

Plans for utilizing the Nesjavellir area for geothermal power and water heating began in 1947, when some boreholes were drilled to evaluate the area’s potential for power generation. Research continued from 1965 to 1986. In 1987, the construction of the plant began, and the cornerstone was laid in May 1990. The station produces approximately 120 MW of electrical power; it also delivers around 1,100 litres (290 US gal) of hot water (82-85°C) per second, servicing the space heating and hot water needs of the Greater Reykjavík Area.

I woiuld have loved to have a tour of the power station.

What surprised me about geothermal power, was that the Phillipines are very large users of the technology, which is described as a geothermal success story in this article in Wikipedia. According to Wikipedia, twenty seven percent of their power comes from geothermal sources.

I suppose the only drawback with geothermal power is that for the generation of large amounts of energy, you are generally in an area prone to volcanic eruptions and earthquakes.

It may seem strange, but even in Cornwall, a company is trying to use geothermal energy to generate electricity. Read about the United Downs project on Wikipedia. Whether it will ever work as planned, will be down to the skill of the engineers and probably the will of politicians.

 

July 13, 2014 Posted by | Transport | , , , , , | Leave a comment