The Anonymous Widower

Morocco Could Produce Up To 4% Of World’s Green Hydrogen By 2030

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Morocco World News.

This is the first paragraph.

Morocco could produce up to 4% of the global demand for green hydrogen by 2030, according to the German Ministry of Economic Cooperation and Development.

They are aiming to produce 10,000 tonnes of hydrogen per year by 2025.

Wikipedia has an informative topic called Energy Policy in Morocco, which indicates the following.

  • The country has little oil and gas reserves. Although it does have some oil shale, that could be developed.
  • Wind, solar and hydro power are being developed.
  • They could install a nuclear power station East of Rabat.

It sounds, that they could have an electricity structure, that would be ideal for the production of green hydrogen.

Conclusion

Morocco could be joining an ever growing club, which includes Australia, Saudi Arabia and Spain, who will produce hydrogen for export to countries like Germany, Japan and South Korea.

March 15, 2021 Posted by | Hydrogen | , , , , , | 1 Comment

Novel Long-Duration Energy Storage System Installed At World’s Largest CSP Plant

The title of this post is the same as that of this article on Recharge.

This is the sub-title.

Technology that stores power in molten aluminium inaugurated at 580MW Noor Ouarzazate solar complex in Morocco.

Other points from the original  article.

  • The idea is from Swedish start-up; Azelio.
  • The the Noor Ouarzazate solar complex is rated at 580MW
  • Noor is Arabic for light.
  • Energy is stored as heat in molten recycled aluminium at 600 °C.
  • When energy is needed, a Stirling engine is used to generate energy.
  • Waste heat can also be captured and used to heat buildings.
  • The system has a 90 % round-trip efficiency.

I feel this could be a winner in the long term.

March 7, 2020 Posted by | Energy, Energy Storage | , , , | Leave a comment

Leaving Casablanca

I took these pictures as the Oriana left Casablanca

I have not annotated them. The mosque named after Hassan II is in many of the pictures.

March 29, 2013 Posted by | Transport | , , , | Leave a comment

The Maverick

This ship was docked in front of the Oriana in Casablanca.

For whatever reason, I don’t know, it was stuck in the port, so the captain of the Oriana sent some of our food to keep the crew of The Maverick going for another few days.

The Maverick

The Maverick

I would assume that the owners didn’t have the money for port fees or something.

Everybody thought it was right, that the Captain took the action he did.  But then it is a law of the sea to help fellow seafarers.

March 29, 2013 Posted by | Food, Transport | , , , , | Leave a comment

Summing Up Casablanca

The trip to the beach was excellent, but that couldn’t be said for the weather! I’ve been to Morocco before, and it was just as non-threatening as Marrakesh was ten years ago.

One thing that I noticed, was that a lot of the young Moroccan women, don’t bother to cover their hair, as most women do in Muslim countries.  Coupled with the vast numbers of newspapers on the streets, does this show that Morocco is joining the modern world? Incidentally, I did hear a report on BBC World, that said that Morocco was one of the most welcoming countries in the world.

Let’s hope it stays that way! Or possibly gets even better!

I remember last time in Marrakesh that we had been recommended a restaurant by one of C’s colleagues in her chambers.  We asked the concierge of our five star hotel, how we could get to the restaurant and he said to take a taxi, as the restaurant was difficult to find. We then asked how we got a taxi to get home and he said, that if we felt up to it the best way was to walk, as Marrakesh was a safe city.

So after an  amazing meal, we walked back to the hotel!

The only interaction we had on the walk, was when a guy courteously waved us through, as he was in a hurry.

March 29, 2013 Posted by | Transport | , , , , | Leave a comment

Walking Back To The Oriana

I took these pictures as I walked back to the Oriana.

They do illustrate, what I said in this post about there being a need for a good walking route from the tram to the dock.

I always photograph daisies.

March 29, 2013 Posted by | Transport, World | , , , , | Leave a comment

The Beach At The End Of The Line

The beach was lots of flat sand, with the sort of dramatic sea, for which the Atlantic Ocean is renowned.

It was actually fairly deserted, so after my orange juice, I returned to the city centre.

But it was worth it, just for that orange juice alone, which had been freshly squeezed for my benefit. I have only ever had one orange juice anywhere near the same quality and that was in a five star hotel in probably Spain.

That would have cost me a lot more than the thirty pence or so the Casablancan one did!

March 29, 2013 Posted by | Transport | , , , , | Leave a comment

The Casablanca Tram

I was about to go back to the boat, when I saw a tram, with the destination of Plage on the front.

It was a trip worth taking on the Casatram, that was only a few months old.

If the tram has a problem for cruise visitors, it is that although it goes fairly near to where the Oriana was docked, there is no walking route to the tramway, as there is a lot of dock-related buildings in the way.

It was however very easy to use, provided you had a few coins in the Morrocan currency. Instructions were in French, Arabic and English.

March 29, 2013 Posted by | Transport | , , , , | 2 Comments

Casablanca In The Rain

As we started to explore the city it started to rain.

As you can see, it wasn’t just drizzle.

March 29, 2013 Posted by | Transport | , , , | Leave a comment

Arriving At Casablanca

We arrived in Casablanca early on Friday, the 22nd, which seeing as it was the day for prayers in the Muslim world, probably wasn’t the best days for those, who wanted to visit the mosque in the city.

The ship was fairly close into the centre of the city and it was about a fifteen minute walk.

March 29, 2013 Posted by | Transport | , , , | Leave a comment