The Anonymous Widower

All You Want To Know About Highview Power

This article on Power is entitled Market Prospects Heating Up for Cryogenic Energy Storage.

It talks in detail about the technology, financing and market prospects for Highview Power and their CRYOBattery.

  • Their batteries store energy by liquifying air and storing it in large tanks.
  • To recover the energy, the air is encouraged to go to a gaseous phase and put through an air turbine.
  • Their first commercial system is being built at Carrington near Manchester.
  • The Carrington system will have an output of 50 MW and be able to store up to 250 MWh.
  • Other systems are under development for Vermont and Spain.
  • The systems are built like Leho from readily available components from the oil and gas industry.

One of my regrets in life, is that I missed the crowdfunding for this company!

Read the article as you might find one of Highview Power’s CRYOBatteries coming to a site near you.

Power’s article is the best yet on describing the technology.

 

June 2, 2021 Posted by | Energy Storage | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Gravitricity Celebrates Success Of 250kW Energy Storage Demonstrator

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on the Solar Power Portal.

I have already posted about this success in Gravitricity Battery Generates First Power At Edinburgh Site.

But the news story has now been mentioned in several respected publications and web sites.

So this idea, based on traditional Scottish products of heavy weights and girders seems to be getting valuable publicity.

The demonstrator is only small and uses two 25 tonne weights and a fifteen metre tower.

This is only a storage capacity of only 2.04 kWh, but the company is talking of weights totalling up to a massive 12,000 tonnes.

With a fifteen metre tower, that would be 490 kWh.

Note.

  1. The shafts at Kellingley Colliery in Yorkshire are 800 metres deep.
  2. The TauTona mine in South Africa is 3.9 kilometres deep
  3. In this article in The Engineer, Gravitricity talk about weights of up to 12,000 tonnes.

These are typical storage capacities.

  • Kellingley – 50 tonnes – 109 kWh
  • Kellingley – 12,000 tonnes – 26.15 MWh
  • TauTona – 50 tonnes – 531 kWh
  • TuaqTona = 12,000 – 127.5 MWh

Accountants before they invest in a company look at the financial figures. As an engineer, I look at the numbers in the science behind their claims.

If the engineering can be made to work, these figures are to say the least; very promising.

They are also beautifully scalable.

If say your application needed a 2 MWh battery and you had a 400 metre shaft available, you can calculate the weight needed. It’s around 1836 tonnes.

The Solar Power Portal article finishes with these two paragraphs.

The company will now look to rollout the technology in a series of full-scale 4-8MW projects, with conversations already underway with mine owners in the UK, Scandinavia, Poland and the Czech Republic, it said. Additionally, in South Africa Gravitricity is working closely with mine operator United Mining Services as part of a programme funded by an Innovate UK Energy Catalyst programme to identify potential schemes.

“A key feature of our full-scale projects will be their long life” added Blair. “Once built, our system can last for over 25 years, with no loss in output or degradation over time. This makes gravity storage cost-effective. And unlike batteries, we have no reliance on rare metals such as cobalt and nickel which are becoming increasingly scarce in the global drive to electrification.”

Note.

  1. I assume that they are 4-8 MWh projects.
  2. Charlie Blair is the Managing Director of Gravitricity.
  3. A weight of 1836 tonnes would give 4 MWh in the 800 metre shaft at Kellingley.

I wouldn’t be surprised that those owning a deep empty hole in the ground will be starting conversations with Gravitricity!

Conclusion

I am not worried, that I bought a few shares in Gravitricity in the crowd-funding last year!

All this good publicity from the BBC, Good News Network, Science, The Engineer, The Times and other media sites won’t harm my investment.

 

April 24, 2021 Posted by | Energy, Energy Storage, Finance | , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Gravitricity Battery Generates First Power At Edinburgh Site

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on the BBC.

This is the first paragraph.

A project to create electricity from gravity has generated its first power at a demonstrator site in Edinburgh.

This is only a demo to prove the technology, but all great oaks start as acorns.

I have great hopes for Gravitricity and I should declare an interest, as I bought a few shares in a crowdfunding.

April 21, 2021 Posted by | Energy, Energy Storage, Finance | , | 1 Comment

Lithium Project Raises Millions In A Day

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Cornish Stuff.

This is the introductory paragraph.

Cornish Lithium raised over £3m yesterday to fund new exploration and today opens up the crowd fund to the community.

It does seem to have been a very successful funding.

This to me is a key paragraph.

The company say they are delighted to note that approximately 15% of the pre-registered investors were from Cornwall.

The Cornishmen and Cornishwomen seem to be backing their local business!

October 15, 2020 Posted by | Finance | , , , | Leave a comment

Alternative Funding Seems To Be Doing Well

I watch a couple of crowdfunding sites and they certainly seem to be still attracting funds.

I have recently invested a small sum in Cornish Lithium, as I like both the technology and history of the company.

Their round of crowdfunding is coming to an end, as they have raised £4.5 million against a target of £1.5 million.

It certainly appears that there is money for a good company in these troubled times.

October 14, 2020 Posted by | Finance, Health | , , , | Leave a comment

Powered By Footsteps

These lights at Canary Wharf were on BBC yesterday morning.

The company is looking for funding on Crowdcube.

I think that this sort of technology could have its uses. But possibly more when it is integrated into a common unit!

London and other cities have thousands of entry gates for the rail systems. Think how you use these!

You walk up and as you go through the barrier you either enter your ticket in a slot and pick it up again or touch your contactless card on a reader. You may not come to a full stop, but you will check your walk and this will result in you feet pressing a bit harder on the space between the sides of the gate. Thus a pressure pad in every gate would generate a bit of electricity for the station.

Ticket Gates At Homerton

Ticket Gates At Homerton

Such an application could be part of a comprehensive energy system for a station, where the warmth from passengers, solar power from the roof and other power sources are collected to make the station less dependent on electricity from the mains. Network Rail have already used energy collection in stations like Blackfriars and the new London Bridge, so footfall collection could be another tool to help.

It could also be used in say a remote unmanned ticket gate on a station, such as where a platform is very long and some passengers need to entry and exit perhaps a hundred metres from the staff.

But although there is a large number of entry gates in the UK and worldwide, I would suspect that the gate manufacturers would develop their own systems.

I wish Pavegen well, but I don’t think I shall be investing.

May 28, 2015 Posted by | Finance, Transport | , , | Leave a comment