The Anonymous Widower

£100m Boost For Biggest UK Hydro Scheme In Decades

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on the BBC.

This is the sub-heading.

A giant hydro scheme which would double the UK’s ability to store energy for long periods is taking a leap forward with a £100m investment by SSE.

These are the first three paragraphs.

The proposed 92m-high dam and two reservoirs at Coire Glas in the Highlands would be Britain’s biggest hydroelectric project for 40 years.

Scottish ministers approved the 1.5 GW pumped storage facility in 2020.

But power giant SSE wants assurances from the UK government before finally signing it off.

There are two major problems with this scheme.

Why The Forty Year Wait?

I am an Electrical and Control Engineer and it is a scandal that we are waiting forty years for another pumped storage scheme like the successful  Electric Mountain or Cruachan power stations to arrive.

Petrol or diesel vehicles have batteries for these three main purposes.

  • To start the engine.
  • To stabilise the output of the generator or alternator.
  • To provide emergency power.

As to the latter, I can’t be the only person, who has dragged a car out of a ford on the starter motor. But think of the times, you’ve used the hazard warning lights, after an accident or an engine failure.

The nightmare of any operator of a complicated electricity network like the UK’s is a black start, which is defined by Wikipedia like this.

A black start is the process of restoring an electric power station or a part of an electric grid to operation without relying on the external electric power transmission network to recover from a total or partial shutdown.

Hydro electric power stations and especially those that are part of pumped storage schemes are ideal for providing the initial power, as they are often easy to start and have water available. Cruachan power station has a black start capability, but at 440 MW is it big enough?

Over the last few years, many lithium-ion batteries have been added to the UK power network, which are used to stabilise the grid, when the sun isn’t shining and the wind isn’t blowing.

There are four pumped storage hydro-electric schemes in the UK.

Note.

  1. I always give the power output and the storage capacity for a battery, if it is known.
  2. According to Wikipedia, Scotland has a potential for around 500 GWh of pumped storage.
  3. The largest lithium-ion battery that I know, that is being planned in the UK, is Intergen’s 320 MW/640 MWh battery at Thames Gateway, that I wrote about in Giant Batteries Will Provide Surge Of Electricity Storage. It’s smaller than any of the four current pumped storage schemes.
  4. The Wikipedia entry for Coire Glas says that it is a 1.5 GW/30 GWh pumped storage hydro-electric power station.

I very much feel that even one 1.5 GW/30 GWh pumped storage hydro-electric power station must make a big difference mathematically.

Why have we had to wait so long? It’s not as though a pumped storage hydro-electric power station of this size has suffered a serious disaster.

Drax Needs Assurances Too?

The BBC article says this.

Scotland’s only other pumped storage scheme, operated by Drax Group, is housed within a giant artificial cavern inside Ben Cruachan on the shores of Loch Awe in Argyll.

The North Yorkshire-based company plans to more than double the generating capacity of its facility, nicknamed Hollow Mountain, to more than 1GW, with the construction of a new underground power station.

But both Drax and SSE have been reluctant to press ahead without assurances from Whitehall.

It looks like the right assurances would open up at least two pumped storage hydro-electric power station projects.

But it could be better than that, as there are other projects under development.

This totals to 3750 MW/104.3 GWh or 5850 MW/134.3 GWh with the addition of Coire Glas and the extension to Cruachan.

Getting the assurances right could result in large amounts of construction in Scotland!

What Assurances Do Power Giants SSE And Drax Want Before Signing Off?

This news item on SSE Renewables, which is dated 18th March 2022, is entitled Ministerial Roundtable Seeks To Unlock Investment In UK Energy Storage.

These three paragraphs gives details of the meeting.

Business leaders have met with UK Energy Minister the Rt Hon Greg Hands MP to discuss how the government could unlock significant investment in vital energy storage technologies needed to decarbonise the power sector and help ensure greater energy independence.

The meeting was organised by the Long-Duration Electricity Storage Alliance, a new association of companies, progressing plans across a range of technologies to be first of their kind to be developed in the UK for decades.

Representatives from Drax, SSE Renewables, Highview Power and Invinity Energy Systems met with The Rt Hon Greg Hands MP, Minister of State for Business, Energy and Clean Growth [yesterday].

But they still don’t seem to have come up with a funding mechanism.

  • In this case, it seems that multiple politicians may not be to blame, as Greg Hands was the Minister of State for Business, Energy and Clean Growth until the 6th of September 2022, when he handed over to Graham Stuart, who is still the incumbent.
  • Could it be that civil servants for this problem need to be augmented by a Control Engineer with mathematical modelling skills from a practical university?

It is the sort of problem, I would love to get my teeth into, but unfortunately my three mentors in accountancy and banking; Bob, Brian and David, who could have helped me, have all passed on to another place to help someone else with their problems.

I’ve just had a virtual meeting with all three and they told me to look at it like a warehousing system.

Consider.

  • It would be very easy to measure the amount of water stored in the upper reservoir of a pumped storage hydro-electric power station.
  • It would also be easy to measure the electricity flows to and from the pumped storage hydro-electric power station.
  • A monetary value could be placed on the water in the upper reservoir and the flows, depending on the current price for electricity.

So it should be possible to know that a pumped storage hydro-electric power station, was perhaps storing energy as follows.

  • 10 GWh for SSE
  • 8 GWh for RWE
  • 6 GWh for Scottish Power
  • 6 GWh is not being used

And just as in a warehouse, they would pay a fee of so much for storing each GWh for an hour.

  • The system would work with any type of storage.
  • Would competition between the various storage sites bring down prices for storing electricity?
  • Pumped storage operators would get a bonus when it rained heavily.
  • Just as they do now, electricity generators would store it when prices are low and retrieve it when prices are high.

A lot of the rules used to decide where electricity goes would still work.

 

 

March 22, 2023 Posted by | Energy, Energy Storage, Finance | , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

SSE, Marubeni & CIP’s Floating Wind Farm In Scotland Could Have 270 Turbines And 6 Offshore Substations

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on offshoreWIND.biz.

This is the sub-heading.

SSE Renewables, Marubeni and Copenhagen Infrastructure Partners (CIP) have submitted the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) Scoping Report for the array area of their Ossian floating wind farm to Marine Scotland. According to the report, the wind farm could have up to 270 wind turbines and six offshore substations.

Ossian floating wind farm will be one of the world’s largest floating wind farms.

  • If it sticks to 3.6 GW, 270 turbines will mean 13 MW turbines.
  • 14 MW would be 3.8 GW and 15 MW would be 4 GW, with the same number of turbines.
  • If they stick to 3.6 GW, this could be 257 x 14 MW or 240 x 15 MW turbines.
  • Knowing ambitious engineers as I do and given that 15 MW turbines are on the way, I wouldn’t be surprised to see 15 MW turbines, to get the full 4 GW.
  • According to this press release from Siemens Gamesa, they can make the turbine blades for their 15 MW turbines in Hull.

These two paragraphs outline the design possibilities.

For the floating wind turbine foundations, the consortium is considering either semi-submersible or Tension Leg Platform (TLP) structures and three mooring configurations; catenary, semi taut and taut mooring lines. Anchoring options currently under consideration include driven piles, and a number of different embedded anchor types, including suction piles, Drag Embedment Anchors (DEA) and VLA, with up to nine anchors required per foundation.

Floating foundations might not only be used for the wind turbines, but also for Ossian’s offshore substations.

When I look at a project like this, I also think of the project management possibilities.

  • Will the six offshore sub-stations be positioned, so that as turbines are installed, they can be commissioned and start generating electricity?
  • Is there software to optimise the order of installation?
  • Has a specialist project management system been written for wind farms?

If you need a program to do analyse anything like that, buy me a drink and we’ll talk about it.

It’s about time, some of the algorithms in my brain were put to use.

The article also says this.

The 3.6 GW Ossian floating wind farm is planned to be up and running before the end of the decade.

My experience tells me, that if the right philosophy is used, that estimated date could be beaten.

It’s just that it is a project with so many complexities, that a proper mathematical model of its construction would yield benefits.

March 17, 2023 Posted by | Energy | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Dogger Bank Wind Farm Officially Celebrates Its Operations And Maintenance Base Opening

The title of this post is the same as that of this news item on the Dogger Bank wind farm web site.

These bullet points introduce the item.

  • 150 guests and employees gathered to celebrate the official opening.
  • The state-of-the-art base will be the hub for operations and monitor 5% of UK electricity from its control room.
  • Over 400 long-term jobs have been created locally to support Operations and Maintenance from South Tyneside for the 35-year life of the wind farm.
  • The world-class facility will be operated in line with the UK Green Building Council’s (UKGBC) Net Zero Carbon Buildings Framework

This Google Map shows the location of the base.

The red arrow indicates the base, which appears to be convenient for the North Sea.

This second Google Map shows a close up if the site.

There is a nice long quayside, which in the future could be large enough to assemble floating turbines.

This third image is a Google Map 3D visualisation of the site from across the Tyne.

The news item says this about the ownership and operation of the Dogger Bank wind farm.

Dogger Bank Wind Farm is a joint venture between SSE Renewables (40%), Equinor (40%) and Vårgrønn (20%). SSE Renewables is lead operator for the development and construction of Dogger Bank Wind Farm. Equinor will be lead operator of the wind farm on completion for its expected operational life of around 35 years.

Initially, the Port of Tyne base will operate and maintain these wind farms.

  • Dogger Bank A – 1235 MW
  • Dogger Bank B – 1235 MW
  • Dogger Bank C – 1218 MW

This gives a total of 3688 MW.

Note.

  1. SSE Renewables and Equinor are also developing the 1500 MW Dogger Bank D wind farm.
  2. This would bring the total up to 5188 MW.
  3. RWE are also developing the 3000 MW Dogger Bank South wind farm.

Leases were signed for both the Dogger Bank D and Dogger Bank South wind farms in January 2023.

I doubt all of these wind farms will be operated and maintained from the Port of Tyne base, due to the different ownership of Dogger Bank South.

But, I do hope that the facility can be expanded to handle Dogger Bank D.

March 15, 2023 Posted by | Energy | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Case For Pumped Hydro Storage

The Coire Glas Project

Note that Coire Glas is a pumped storage hydroelectric scheme being developed by SSE Renewables.

  • It is rated at 1.5 GW.
  • It can store 30 GWh of electricity.
  • It is being built in the Highlands of Scotland above Loch Lochy.
  • The estimated construction time will be five to six years.
  • It should be operational for more than 50 years.
  • There is more about the project on this page on the Coire Glas web site.

Exploratory works have started.

The Case For Pumped Hydro Storage

The title of this post, as the same as that of this page on the Coire Glas web site.

This is the sub-heading.

A study by independent researchers from Imperial College London found that investing in 4.5GW of pumped hydro storage, with 90GWh of storage could save up to £690m per year in energy system costs by 2050, as the UK transitions to a net-zero carbon emission system.

And this is the first paragraph.

The report focused on the benefits of new long-duration pumped hydro storage in Scotland, as the current most established long-duration energy storage technology. The benefit of long duration storage compared to short duration batteries is being able to continuously charge up the storage with excess renewables and also discharge power to the grid for several hours or days when wind and solar output is low.

So Coire Glas will provide 1.5GW/30GW, so where will we get the other 3 GW/60GW?

Loch Earba Pumped Hydro

In Gilkes Reveals 900MW Scottish Pumped Storage Plan, I introduced Loch Earba Pumped Hydro.

  • It is rated at 900 MW
  • It can store 33 GWh of electricity.
  • It is being built in the Highlands of Scotland to the East of Fort William.
  • The estimated construction time will be three to four years.
  • It should be operational for more than 50 years.
  • There is more about the project on the Earba Storage web site.

It would appear we could be edging towards the Imperial College target in lumps of about 1GW/30 GWh.

Other Schemes In Scotland

These are other proposed or planned schemes in Scotland.

Balliemeanoch Pumped Hydro

Balliemeanoch Pumped Hydro now has a web site.

The proposed Balliemeanoch pumped hydro scheme will have these characteristics.

  • Output of the power station will be 1.5 GW
  • Available storage could be 45 GWh.

This medium-sized station has a lot of storage.

Corrievarkie Pumped Hydro

Corrievarkie Pumped Hydro now has a web site.

The proposed Corrievarkie pumped hydro scheme will have these characteristics.

  • Output of the power station will be 600 MW
  • Available storage could be 14.5 GWh.

This medium-sized station has a moderate amount of storage.

Loch Kemp Pumped Hydro

I wrote about Loch Kemp Pumped Hydro in Loch Kemp Pumped Hydro, where I said this.

The proposed Loch Kemp pumped hydro scheme will have these characteristics.

  • Loch Kemp will be the upper reservoir.
  • Loch Ness will be the lower reservoir.
  • The power station will be on the banks of Loch Ness.
  • The power station will be designed to fit into the environment.
  • Eight dams will be built to enlarge Loch Kemp.
  • Trees will be planted.
  • Output of the power station will be 300 MW
  • Available storage could be 9 GWh.

The medium-sized station will have almost as much storage capacity as Electric Mountain, but that power station has an output of 1.8 GW.

Red John Pumped Hydro

I wrote about Red John Pumped Hydro in Red John Pumped Storage Hydro Project, where I said this.

I have also found a web site for the project, which is part of the ILI Group web site.

  • The scheme has an output of 450 MW.
  • The storage capacity is 2,800 MWh or 2.8 GWh.
  • The scheme has planning consent.
  • The project is budgeted to cost £550 million.
  • The construction program indicates that the scheme will be completed by the end of 2025.

Not a large scheme, but every little helps.

Proposed Pumped Hydro In Scotland

I have listed these schemes.

Note.

  1. The scheme’s name is linked to their web site.
  2. The two figures are output and storage capacity.

There is a total output of 5.25 GW and a total storage capacity of 134.3 GWh.

Conclusion

If all these schemes are built, Imperial’s targets of an output of 4.5 GW and a storage capacity of 90 GWh will be comfortably exceeded.

 

February 19, 2023 Posted by | Energy, Energy Storage | , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

SSE Renewables Lays Out Plans To Bolster Ties With Fishing Industry

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on offshorewind.biz.

This is the sub-heading.

SSE Renewables has published a report that sets out the company’s vision to better co-exist with fisheries when building and developing offshore wind energy.

Sounds like a good idea on the line of Jaw, jaw is better than war, war!

The original press release is here.

January 25, 2023 Posted by | Energy, Food | , , | Leave a comment

Scotland’s Largest Offshore Wind Farm Entering Home Stretch

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on offshoreWIND.biz.

December 5, 2022 Posted by | Energy | , , , , , | 2 Comments

Ossian Floating Wind Farm Could Have Capacity Of 3.6 GW

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on offshoreWIND.biz,

This is the first paragraph.

SSE Renewables, Marubeni Corporation, and Copenhagen Infrastructure Partners (CIP) have identified an increase in the potential overall project capacity for their Ossian floating wind project in Scotland from 2.6 GW to up to 3.6 GW.

It appears that surveys have shown that the wind farm can be bigger.

About The Name Ossian

This press release from SSE is entitled New Offshore Wind Farm To Take Name From Scottish Literature.

These three paragraphs explain the name and the partners behind the project.

A new wind farm project in Scotland is to take its name from an historic series of books which depict the epic quests of a third-century Scottish leader, following his adventures across rolling seas.

Ossian (pronounced ‘os-si-un’) from The Poems of Ossian is to be the name for the proposed new offshore wind farm across 858 km2 of seabed in waters off the east coast of Scotland.

The project will be delivered by the partnership of leading Scottish renewable energy developer, SSE Renewables, Japanese conglomerate Marubeni Corporation (Marubeni) and Danish fund management company Copenhagen Infrastructure Partners (CIP).

I don’t think the three partners will have any difficulty raising the extra finance to expand the wind farm.

Where Is The Ossian Wind Farm?

This Crown Estate Scotland map shows the position of each of the Scotwind wind farms.

Note, that the numbers are Scotwind’s lease number in their documents.

The Ossian wind farm is numbered two.

At present, the South Eastern group of wind farms are as follows.

  • 1 – BP – Fixed – 2.9 GW
  • 2 – SSE – Floating – 2.6 GW
  • 3 – Falck – Floating – 1.2 GW
  • 4 – Shell – Floating – 2.0 GW
  • 5 – Vattenfall – Floating – 0.8 GW
  • 6 – DEME – Fixed – 1.0 GW

This totals to 10.5 GW, which would be 11.5 GW, if the capacity of Ossian is increased.

Will Ossian And Nearby Wind Farms Be Developed As A Co-Operation?

The six companies involved in this group of wind farms, are all experienced developers of wind farms or oil and gas fields.

They also come from all around the world, so I can see the best technology being employed on this group of wind farms.

Will Other Wind Farms In The Group Be Expanded?

The surveys at Ossian appear to have shown that the area is ideal for floating wind and this is enabling the expansion of the farm.

I wouldn’t be surprised to see some of the other wind farms be expanded.

I also feel that floating wind farms like Ossian, where it is likely that all the turbines on their floats are connected to a central substation, that could also be floating, may be a lot easier to expand.

Does Ossian Wind Farm Have A Web Site?

Not that Google can find, although ossianwindfarm.com appears to be under construction.

November 4, 2022 Posted by | Energy | , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Plans Emerge For 8 GW Of Offshore Wind On Dogger Bank

Wikipedia has an entry, which is a List Of Offshore Wind Farms In The United Kingdom.

The totals are worth a look.

  • Operational – 13279 MW
  • Under Construction – 4125 MW
  • Proposed Under The UK Government’s Contracts For Difference Round 3 – 2412 MW
  • Proposed Under The UK Government’s Contracts For Difference Round 4 – 7026 MW
  • Exploratory Phase, But No Contract for Difference – Scotland – 24,826 MW
  • Exploratory Phase, But No Contract for Difference – England – 14,500 MW

Note.

  1. That gives a Grand Total of 66,168 MW or 66.168 GW.
  2. The government’s target is 50 GW of offshore wind by 2030.
  3. The typical UK power need is around 23 GW, so with nuclear and solar, we could be approaching three times the electricity generation capacity that we currently need.

The figures don’t include projects like Berwick Bank, Cerulean Wind, Norfolk Vanguard or Northern Horizons, which are not mentioned in Wikipedia’s list.

I regularly look at the list of wind farms in this Wikipedia entry and noticed that the number of Dogger Bank wind farms had increased.

They are now given as.

  • Dogger Bank A – 1200 MW – Completion in 2023/24
  • Dogger Bank B – 1200 MW – Completion in 2024/25
  • Dogger Bank C – 1200 MW – Completion in 2024/25
  • Dogger Bank D – 1320 MW – No Completion Given
  • Dogger Bank South – 3000 MW – No Completion Given

Note, that gives a Grand Total of 7920 MW or 7.920 GW.

This article on offshoreWIND.biz is entitled BREAKING: SSE, Equinor Plan 1.3 GW Dogger Bank D Offshore Wind Project.

It was published on the October 6th, 2022 and starts with this summary.

SSE Renewables and Equinor are looking into building what would be the fourth part of Dogger Bank Wind Farm, the world’s largest offshore wind farm, whose three phases (A, B and C) are currently under construction. Surveys are now underway at an offshore site where the partners want to develop Dogger Bank D, which would bring Dogger Bank Wind Farm’s total capacity to nearly 5 GW if built.

Obviously, there are a few ifs and buts about this development, but it does look like SSE Renewables and Equinor are serious about developing Dogger Bank D.

More Dogger Bank Gigawatts for UK As RWE Moves Forward With Two 1.5 GW Projects

This subheading describes, the 3 GW wind farm, that I listed earlier as Dogger Bank South.

These three paragraphs describe the projects.

RWE is now moving forward with two new offshore wind farms in the Zone, each with a 1.5 GW generation capacity, after the company obtained approval from the UK Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) to enter into an Agreement for Lease with The Crown Estate this Summer, following the Round 4 leasing process.

The wind farms will be built at two adjacent sites located just southwest of the Dogger Bank A offshore wind farm and are dubbed Dogger Bank South (DBS) East and Dogger Bank South (DBS) West.

RWE has also started with geophysical seabed surveys within the wind turbine array areas for its two new projects.

It appears that they have already got the leasing process started.

When Will Dogger Bank D And Dogger Bank South Be Operational?

Consider.

  • In How Long Does It Take To Build An Offshore Wind Farm?, showed that a lot of offshore wind farms have gone from planning permission to first operation in six years.
  • I don’t think that there will be planning permission problems on the Dogger Bank.
  • The two wind farms are a continuation of Dogger Bank A, B and C and the Sofia wind farms.
  • A lot of the construction, would be more of the same.

With average luck, I can see Dogger Bank D and Dogger Bank South in full production before the end of 2028.

October 16, 2022 Posted by | Energy | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

SSE Renewables Completes Acquisition Of European Renewable Energy Development Platform

The title of this post, is the same as that of this press release from SSE.

This paragraph introduces the deal.

SSE Renewables has completed the transaction with Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy (SGRE) to acquire its existing European renewable energy development platform for a consideration of €580m.

I have a few thoughts.

Why Have Siemens Gamesa Sold Their European Renewable Energy Development Platform?

This article on Renewables Now is entitled Siemens Gamesa Wraps Up Sale Of 3.9-GW Wind Portfolio To SSE Renewables, gives a reason.

For the turbine maker, the sale represents one of the measures implemented to rein in profit losses quarter after quarter due to internal challenges, high costs and supply chain issues.

As with many things, it appears to be all about the money.

Can SSE Renewables Afford It?

Consider.

SSE seem to have found a Scottish magic money tree.

€580m is just small change.

What Projects Are Included In The Deal?

This is a paragraph from the press release.

The SGRE portfolio includes c.3.8GW of onshore wind development projects – around half of which is located in Spain with the remainder across France, Italy and Greece – with scope for up to 1.4GW of additional co-located solar development opportunities. Development of the portfolio of projects has continued to progress since the acquisition was announced in April, with additional opportunities identified and permits and grid connections advancing. Over 2GW of the total pipeline is considered to be at a secured stage, where a grid connection or land agreement has been secured or relevant permits granted.

Note.

  1. As an engineer, I note that there is no offshore wind, which surely is the renewable energy development with most risk and installation costs.
  2. SSE Renewables have a lot of experience of onshore wind, so delivering and financing the extra 3.8 GW, shouldn’t be a problem.
  3. The 1.4 GW of solar comes with the word co-located. Wind and solar together, perhaps with a battery must surely be a good investment in the sunnier climes of Europe.

It doesn’t look to me that SSE Renewables have bought a load of assets that no-one wants.

I do wonder thought, if Siemens Gamesa were having trouble progressing this large diverse portfolio of projects, due to a shortage of resources like money and engineers.

So are SSE finishing off a few projects and they can transfer a few engineers to these projects?

Are SSE Spreading The Risk?

SSE operate mainly in the UK and Ireland, so is adding Spain, France, Italy and Greece a good idea?

Of the four new countries, it’s unlikely that all will perform well, but a mixed portfolio is usually a good idea.

Will SSE Renewables  Buy Siemens Gamesa Turbines In The Future?

SSE Renewables seem to do an individual deal on each wind farm, as no one manufacturer dominates.

But now Siemens Gamesa may be more financially stable, perhaps they can get a better deal for the turbines they want.

Conclusion

I don’t think SSE Renewables have done a bad deal.

 

 

September 5, 2022 Posted by | Energy | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Berwick Bank Wind Farm Could Provide Multi-Billion Pound Boost To Scottish Economy And Generate Thousands Of Jobs

The title of this post, is the same as that of this press release from SSE.

This press release is all about numbers.

  • 307 turbines
  • 4.1 GW nameplate capacity
  • 5 million homes will be powered
  • 8 million tonnes of carbon dioxide avoided
  • Up to £8.3 billion to the UK economy
  • 4650 potential jobs in Scotland
  • 9300 potential jobs in the UK

These are all large figures.

This map from SSE shows the location of the wind farm.

The press release says this about connections to the grid.

Berwick Bank has secured a grid connection at Branxton, near Torness, in East Lothian. A second grid connection will be required for the project, which has been determined as Blyth, Northumberland.

Note, that Torness is the site of Torness nuclear power station.

  • It has a nameplate capacity of 1.29 GW.
  • It is scheduled to be shutdown in 2028.

This Google Map shows the coast between Dunbar and Torness nuclear power station.

Note.

  1. The town of Dunbar is outlined in red.
  2. The yellow line running diagonally across the map is the A1 road.
  3. Torness nuclear power station is in the South-East corner of the map to the North of the A1.

This second Google Map shoes an enlargement of the South-East corner of the map.

Note.

  1. Torness nuclear power station at the top of the map.
  2. The A1 road running across the map.
  3. The East Coast Main Line to the South of the A1.
  4. Innerwick Castle in the South-West corner of the map.

This Google Map shows the location of Branxton substation in relation to Innerwick Castle.

Note.

  1. Innerwick Castle is in the North-West corner of the map.
  2. Branxton substation is in the South-East corner of the map.

I estimate that the distance between Torness nuclear power station and Branxton substation is about five kilometres. The cable appears to be underground.

I have some thoughts.

Will The Connection Between Berwick Bank Wind Farm And Branxton Substation Be Underground?

If SSE follows the precedent of Torness nuclear power station, it will be underground.

Or will they use T-pylons?

This page on the National Grid web site is entitled What’s A T-Pylon And How Do We Build Them?.

From an engineering point of view, I suspect T-pylons could be used, but aesthetics and local preference may mean the cable is underground.

It should be noted that Torness nuclear power station will be shutdown in 2028. So will the current underground cable for the nuclear power station be repurposed after shutdown for the Berwick Bank wind farm?

This would mean, that the Southern connection cable to Blyth could be built first to support the first turbines erected in the wind farm.

When Will Berwick Bank Wind Farm Be Commissioned?

This page on the Berwick Bank wind farm web site is a briefing pack on the project.

The page gives construction and commission dates of 2026-2030.

Will There Be A Battery At Torness?

As we are talking about the latter half of the current decade for completion of the Berwick Bank wind farm, I believe that a substantial battery could be installed at Torness to smooth the output of the wind farm, when the wins isn’t blowing at full power.

One of Highview Power’s 2.5 GW/30 GWh CRYOBatteries could be about the right size if it has been successfully developed, but I am sure that other batteries will be of a suitable size.

If there is a case for a battery at Torness, there must surely be a case for a battery at Blyth.

Will Berwick Bank Wind Farm Be A Replacement For Torness Nuclear Power Station?

Consider.

  • Torness nuclear power station is shutting down in 2028.
  • Berwick Bank wind farm will be fully operational by 2030.
  • Berwick Bank wind farm could use a repurposed connection to Branxton substation, if the nuclear power station no longer needs it.
  • There is space on the Torness site for a large battery.

, it looks like Torness nuclear power station could be replaced by the larger wind farm.

 

 

 

 

 

September 2, 2022 Posted by | Energy | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment