The Anonymous Widower

Sustainable Marine Delivers Floating Tidal Power To Nova Scotia Grid

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Renewable Energy Magazine.

This is the first paragraph.

Ocean energy pioneer Sustainable Marine has successfully harnessed the enormous tidal currents in Canada’s Bay of Fundy, delivering the first floating in-stream tidal power to Nova Scotia’s grid.

This Google Map shows the Bay Of Fundy.

Note.

  1. The hydrology of the Bay of Fundy has the highest tidal range in the world of sixteen metres, against a worldwide average of about a metre.
  2. According to the Renewable Energy Magazine article, Nova Scotia has allocated circa 30MW of capacity via demonstration permits.
  3. The article also indicates that up to 2.5 GW of clean and predictable energy for Canada could be generated.
  4. By comparison Hinckley Point C nuclear power station will generate 3.26 GW.

The Bay of Fundy would be the largest tidal power station in the world.

But this list in Wikipedia gives these proposed tidal power stations.

There are another two Russian proposals and a South Korean one.

Note.

  1. There are some large numbers.
  2. There are also some huge ambitions and massive budgets.

But will we ever see large scale tidal power stations?

 

May 12, 2022 Posted by | Energy | , , , , | Leave a comment

Amp Wins Consent For 800MW Scots Battery Complex

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on renews.biz.

These are the first two paragraphs.

Canadian storage player Amp Energy has revealed that its 800MW battery portfolio in Scotland has secured planning consent.

The portfolio is due to be operational in April 2024 and will comprise two 400MW battery facilities, each providing 800 megawatt-hours of energy storage capacity.

Some other points from the article.

  • The two facilities will be located at Hunterston and Kincardine.
  • They will be the two  largest grid-connected battery storage facilities in Europe.
  • The two batteries will be optimised by Amp Energy‘s proprietary software.

This Google Map shows the Hunterston area.

Note.

  1. The Hunterston A and Hunterston B nuclear power stations, which are both being decommissioned.
  2. Hunterston B only shut down on the 7th of January, this year.
  3. There is also a large brownfield site in the North-East corner of the map.

This second Google Map shows the South-East corner of the nuclear power station site.

It’s certainly got a good grid connection.

But then it had to support.

  • The Hunterston A nuclear power station rated at 360 MW.
  • The Hunterston B nuclear power station rated at 1.2 GW.
  • The Western HVDC Link, which is an interconnector to Connah’s Quay in North Wales, that is rated at 2.2 GW.

I’m sure that National Grid has a suitable socket for a 400 MW battery.

This Google Map shows the Kincardine area.

Note.

  1. The Clackmannanshire Bridge down the Western side of the map.
  2. The Kincardine Substation to the East of the bridge close to the shore of the River Forth.
  3. The 760 MW Kincardine power station used to be by the substation, but was demolished by 2001.

As at Hunterston, I’m sure that National Grid could find a suitable socket for a 400 MW battery.

Amp Energy’s Philosophy

As a trained Control Engineer I like it.

  • Find a well-connected site, that can handle upwards of 400 MW in and out.
  • Put in a 800 MWh battery, that can handle 400 MW in and out.
  • Optimise the battery, so that it stores and supplies electricity as appropriate.
  • Throw in a bit of artificial intelligence.

Old power station sites would seem an ideal place to site a battery. Especially, as many demolished coal, gas and nuclear stations are around 400-600 MW.

It should be noted that Highview Power are building a 50 MW/400 MWh CRYOBattery on an old coal-fired power station site in Vermont.

The Western HVDC Link

I mentioned earlier that the Northern end of the Western HVDC Link, is at Hunterston.

The Wikipedia entry for the Western HVDC Link, says this about the link.

The Western HVDC Link is a high-voltage direct current (HVDC) undersea electrical link in the United Kingdom, between Hunterston in Western Scotland and Flintshire Bridge (Connah’s Quay) in North Wales, routed to the west of the Isle of Man.[2] It has a transmission capacity of 2,250 MW and became fully operational in 2019.

The link is 262 miles long.

This Google Map shows the Connah’s Quay area in North Wales.

Note.

  1. The red arrow indicates the Flintshire Bridge HVDC converter station, which is the Southern end of the Western HVDC Link.
  2. The Borderlands Line between Liverpool and Chester, runs North-South to the East of the convertor station.
  3. To the East of the railway are two solar farms. The Northern one is Shotwick Solar Park, which at 72 MW is the largest solar farm in the UK.
  4. To the West of the converter station, just to the East of the A 548 road, is the 498 MW Deeside power station.
  5. Follow the A548 road to the West and over the River Dee, the road passes South of the 1420 MW Connah’s Quay Power station.
  6. The two power stations burn gas from Liverpool Bay.
  7. There are a lot of wind turbines along the North Wales Coast and Liverpool Bay.

The map also shows a lot of high electricity users like Tata Steel.

I can certainly see why the Western HVDC Link was built to connect Scotland and North Wales.

  • There is a lot of renewable energy generation at both ends.
  • There are heavy electricity users at both ends.
  • The Scottish Central Belt is at the North.
  • Greater Merseyside is at the South.

The Western HVDC Link is an electricity by-pass, that must have avoided expensive and controversial construction on land.

I wouldn’t be surprised to see another 400 MW/800 MWh battery at the Southern end.

Conclusion

The Canadians seem to have bagged two of the best battery sites in Europe.

  • Both sites would appear to be able to handle 400 MW, based on past capabilities.
  • There is lots of space and extra and/or bigger batteries can probably be connected.
  • Scotland is developing several GW of wind power.

I can see Amp Energy building a series of these 400 MW sites in the UK and around Europe.

This is the big news of the day!

 

January 26, 2022 Posted by | Energy, Energy Storage | , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Goldman Sachs Invests $250 million In Hydrostor To Advance Compressed Air Energy Storage Projects

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on pv Magazine.

This is the introductory paragraph.

The investment is planned to support development and construction of Hydrostor’s 1.1GW, 8.7GWh of Advanced Compressed Air Energy Storage projects that are well underway in California and Australia, and help expand Hydrostor’s project development pipeline globally.

It certainly seems that the big beasts of finance are starting to back innovative energy storage.

January 11, 2022 Posted by | Energy, Energy Storage, Finance | , , , , | Leave a comment

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Locomotive From Canadian Pacific To Roll Out Before 2022

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Hydrogen Fuel News.

This is said.

The hydrogen fuel cell locomotive consists of an SD40-2F, which was converted to run on H2 power and is therefore nicknamed the H2 0EL. The company is calling it a “hydrogen zero-emissions locomotive”, and it will be operating under its own power before the end of this month, according to Canadian Pacific CEO Keith Creel.

Note that the SD40 locomotive is a diesel-electric locomotive of which 1286 were built around 1970.

Canadian Pacific have made this video, which was kindly pointed out by Alan.

The video seems to indicate that the converted locomotive will be able to continue to do the same duties as the original diesels, which have a power output of 2,240 kW.

Interestingly, power output seems to be of the same order as that of a Class 66 locomotive, so could a similar conversion by used with these locomotives?

December 11, 2021 Posted by | Hydrogen, Transport/Travel | , , | 4 Comments

Australian Mining Giant Looks To Canada For Green Hydrogen Projects

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on the Globe And Mail.

These are the first two paragraphs.

An Australian mining giant has signed agreements with three Canadian Indigenous nations to determine the viability of building green hydrogen projects as the company attempts to reinvent itself as a supplier of clean renewable energy.

Fortescue Future Industries (FFI) sees Canada as potentially one of the largest sources of renewable energy in the world and is hoping to develop multiple large-scale green energy projects here.

The article indicates quite a lot about the future direction of FFI.

I certainly think the company is going the right way.

December 3, 2021 Posted by | Energy, Hydrogen | , , | Leave a comment

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Locomotives Ready To Take Over Freight Rail Systems

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on autoevolution.

The article describes how Canadian Pacific are developing hydrogen-powered freight locomotives.

They are converting a couple of locomotives to run on hydrogen and also building two hydrogen plants; one for green hydrogen and one for blue.

It does look that the Canadians are determined to get it right, so are looking at everything they can.

The article is certainly worth reading.

November 4, 2021 Posted by | Hydrogen, Transport/Travel | , , , | Leave a comment

Gigawatt-Scale Compressed Air: World’s Largest Non-Hydro Energy-Storage Projects Announced

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Recharge.

This is the opening paragraph.

The two 500MW/5GWh ‘advanced’ compressed-air projects in California would each be bigger than the current record holder.

They are certainly not small. On the Electric Mountain scale of energy storage, they are both 55 %.

Both appear to be from Canadian company; Hydrostor and will be built in California.

This explanatory video is from the company.

It appears to be a rather elegant solution.

Like Highview Power, the system appears to be based on proven process technology, is zero-carbon, can be built almost anywhere and doesn’t require large amounts of land.

Hydrostor is definitely one to watch.

My only worry about both Hydrostor and Highview systems, is that countries, who don’t recognise patents and design copyrights could develop other systems based on similar physical principles.

 

April 30, 2021 Posted by | Energy Storage | , , , | 1 Comment

CP Hydrogen Locomotive Pilot Powered By Ballard

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Railway Age.

This is the introductory paragraph.

Canadian Pacific (CP) will use fuel cell modules from Ballard Power Systems for its first hydrogen fuel cell (HFC)-powered linehaul freight locomotive.

I have said that someone will build a hydrogen powered freight locomotive for some time  and it looks like Canada is first to show their hand.

The engine shown in the picture in the Railway Age article is 4107, which is an EMD FP9, which looks to be a typical North American diesel-electric locomotive.

  • It has a power of 1300 kW.
  • It can haul freight or passenger trains.
  • Ninety were built in the 1950s.
  • They have a maximum speed of between 65-105 mph.

The diesel engine and alternator will be swapped for six 200 kW fuel cells from Ballard and a battery.

This video shows 4107 leading the Royal Canadian Pacific, which is a luxury excursion passenger train.

Will this train be hydrogen powered in the future? It would be an interesting way to bring in the tourists.

 

 

March 10, 2021 Posted by | Hydrogen, Transport/Travel | , , | 2 Comments

New-Age Battery Pioneer Zinc8 Ties Up With Indian Transformer-Maker For Global Push

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Recharge.

I think, it shows the way the energy storage market is going, where alliances are being formed to exploit the new technologies.

A transformer maker and a battery storage company must be a good match.

Conclusion

I still very much feel that Zinc8, will be a success.

September 23, 2020 Posted by | Energy, Energy Storage | , , | Leave a comment

Why Canada’s Geothermal Industry Is Finally Gaining Ground

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on the Narwhal.

When I think of Canada, I don’t think hot rocks and volcanoes.

But read the article and this Wikipedia article, which is entitled Geothermal Power In Canada, that adds more flesh.

This is an interesting paragraph.

At present, Canada remains the only major country in the Pacific Rim that is not producing electricity from its geothermal resources. This is despite the fact that the colder it is outside, the more electricity a geothermal power plant can produce. This is because the larger the temperature differentials between the geothermal resource and the ambient air temperature, the more efficiently geothermal plants operate. This makes geothermal power ideal for cold northern countries.

Iceland is certainly blessed, with mountains, volcanoes, hot rocks and cooler weather.

In 2016, sixty-five per cent of Iceland’s electricity and space heating was from geothermal sources.

I took the pictures on a summer holiday In July.

It looks like if the articles on the Narwhal and Wikipedia are to be believed, Canada could exploit a lot of geothermal energy resources.

Canada though will have the advantages of not being first.

The technology has already developed in countries like Iceland, the United States and the Philippines.

A lot of the skills needed is available in Canada’s oil industry.

We’re even seeing oilfield services companies like Schlumberger moving into geothermal energy. I wrote about that in Schlumberger New Energy And Thermal Energy Partners Form Geothermal Development Company STEP Energy.

We shouldn’t forget the potential for geothermal energy in the UK. We’re looking seriously in Cornwall and already extracting heat from the Underground in Islington, using similar techniques.

See Drilling Starts For ‘Hot Rocks’ Power In Cornwall and Bunhill 2 Energy Centre.

Conclusion

Geothermal energy would appear to have a high capital cost, but should return a fixed income year-on-year.

For this reason, I believe that funding for viable geothermal schemes, will be easier to obtain, as we improve the engineering and the returns increase.

So expect more geothermal schemes in the future.

 

September 16, 2020 Posted by | Energy | , , , , | Leave a comment