The Anonymous Widower

UK CfD Round 4 Offshore Wind Projects Power Forward

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on offshoreWIND.biz.

These are the first two paragraphs.

All 99 contracts offered through the fourth Allocation Round (AR4) of the UK government’s Contracts for Difference (CfD) scheme have now been signed and returned to Low Carbon Contracts Company (LCCC).

A total of 93 individual projects across Britain will now proceed to work with LCCC to meet the contractual milestones specified in the CfD, supporting projects’ development and the delivery of almost 11 GW of clean energy. The first AR4 projects are due to come online in 2023-24.

It does look like it’s a case of all systems go!

In Will We Run Out Of Power This Winter?, I estimated that these Round 4 projects would come onstream as follows.

  • 2024 – Round 4 Solar – 125.7 MW
  • 2025 – Round 4 Solar – 1958 MW
  • 2025 – Round 4 Onshore Wind – 888 MW
  • 2025 – Round 4 Energy from Waste – 30 MW
  • 2026 – Round 4 Tidal Stream – 5.62 MW
  • 2027 – Round 4 Tidal Stream – 35.2 MW
  • 2027 – Round 4 Floating Offshore Wind – 32 MW
  • 2027 – Round 4 Offshore Wine – 6994 MW

These are totals for the next four years from these contracts.

  • 2024 – 125.7 MW
  • 2025 – 2876 MW
  • 2026 – 5.62 MW
  • 2027 – 7061.2 MW

This is a total of over 10 GW.

 

August 4, 2022 Posted by | Energy | , , , | 1 Comment

Will Our Gas Supplies Hold Up This Winter?

I am prompted to ask this question because of this article in The Times, which is entitled ‘Really High Gas Prices’ Loom For UK As Europe Faces Winter Rationing.

These are a few thoughts.

UK Gas-Fired Power Station Capacity

This entry in Wikipedia is entitled List Of Natural Gas Power Stations In The United Kingdom.

This statement summarises the capacity.

There are currently 32 active gas fired combined cycle power plants operating in the United Kingdom, which have a total generating capacity of 28.0 GW.

This section is entitled Decline Of Gas For Power In The United Kingdom, where this is said.

In 2016 gas fired power stations generated a total of 127 TWh of electricity. Generation has dropped to 119 TWh in 2017, 115 TWh in 2018, 114 TWh in 2019 and 95 TWh in 2020. The decline is largely due to the increase in renewable sources outweighing the decline of coal, and an overall reduction in demand.

Putting these pictures as a table and applying a simple numerical analysis technique gives the following.

  • 2016 – 127 TWh
  • 2017 – 119 TWh – Drop of 8TWh
  • 2018 – 115 TWh – Drop of 4 TWh
  • 2019 – 114 TWh – Drop of 1 TWh
  • 2020 – 95 TWh – Drop of 19 TWh

In four years the amount of electricity generated each year by gas-fired power stations has dropped by an amazing 8 TWh on average per year.

Factors like the increase in renewables and an overall reduction in demand will still apply.

I wouldn’t be surprised to see a continuous reduction of electricity generated by gas of 8 TWh per year.

Figures like these could be possible.

  • 2021 – 87 TWh
  • 2022 – 79 TWh
  • 2023 – 71 TWh
  • 2024 – 63 TWh
  • 2025 – 55 TWh
  • 2026 – 47 TWh
  • 2027 – 39 TWh

I have stopped these figures at 2027, as one major event should happen in that year, as Hinckley Point C is planned to switch on in June 2027, which will contribute 3.26 GW. or 28.5 TWh per year.

In Will We Run Out Of Power This Winter?, I also summarised the energy that will be produced by the various projects, that were signed off recently in the Contracts for Difference Allocation Round 4′, where I said this.

Summarising the figures for new capacity gives.

  • 2022 – 3200 MW
  • 2023 – 1500 MW
  • 3024 – 2400 MW
  • 2025 – 6576 MW
  • 2026 – 1705 MW
  • 2027 – 7061 GW

This totals to 22442 MW.

Note that a 1 GW power source would generate 8.76 TWh of electricity per year.

 

One problem we may have is too much electricity and as we are not blessed with much storage in the UK, where will be able to put it?

In a strange way, Vlad the Mad may solve the problem, by cutting off Europe’s gas.

Jackdaw Gas Field

This document on the Shell web site is the standard information sheet for the Jackdaw field development.

This is the short description of the development.

The Jackdaw field is an uHPHT reservoir that will be developed with a not permanently
attended WHP. Four wells will be drilled at the Jackdaw WHP. Produced fluids will be
exported via a subsea pipeline to the Shearwater platform where these will be processed
before onward export via the Fulmar Gas Line and the Forties Pipeline System.

The proposed development may be summarised as follows:

  • Installation of a new WHP
  • Drilling of four production wells
  • Installation of a new approximately 31 km pipeline from the Jackdaw WHP to the Shearwater platform
  • Processing and export of the Jackdaw hydrocarbons via the Shearwater host platform

First production expected between Q3 – Q4 2025.

Note.

  1. Production could start in just over three years.
  2. This gas will come ashore at the Bacton gas terminal in Norfolk.
  3. Bacton has two gas interconnectors to Europe; one to Belgium and one to The Netherlands, so is ideally connected to export gas to Europe.

Given the high gas prices, I am sure any company would pull out all the stops to shorten the project development time.

HyDeploy

I described HyDeploy, which is a project to blend up to 20 % of hydrogen into the distributed natural gas in HyDeploy.

In The Mathematics Of Blending Twenty Percent Of Hydrogen Into The UK Gas Grid, I worked how much electricity would be needed for HyDeploy’s target blending of hydrogen.

It was 8.2 GW, but!

  • It would save a lot of carbon emissions.
  • Boilers and other appliances wouldn’t have to be changed, although they would probably need a service.
  • It would significantly cut the amount of natural gas we need.
  • It might even be a product to export in its own right.

I certainly feel that HyDeploy is a significant project.

Gas Imports And Existing Fields

This entry in Wikipedia is entitled Energy in the United Kingdom.

In this section, which is entitled Natural Gas, this is said.

United Kingdom produced 60% of its consumed natural gas in 2010. In five years the United Kingdom moved from almost gas self-sufficient (see North Sea gas) to 40% gas import in 2010. Gas was almost 40% of total primary energy supply (TPES) and electricity more than 45% in 2010. Underground storage was about 5% of annual demand and more than 10% of net imports.

Gasfields include Amethyst gasfieldArmada gasfieldEasington Catchment AreaEast KnaptonEverest gasfield and Rhum gasfield.

Consider.

  • We know that the amount of gas used for generating electricity is reducing , due to the increase in renewables and an overall reduction in demand.
  • The cost of both gas imports and exports are rising.
  • In two years time the Jackdaw gas field should be producing gas.

Would it be sensible to squeeze as much gas out of the existing fields, as by the time they run out, renewables, an overall reduction in demand, the Jackdaw gasfield and other factors will mean that we will have enough gas and electricity for our needs.

July 14, 2022 Posted by | Energy, Hydrogen | , , , , , , | 8 Comments

Will We Run Out Of Power This Winter?

Someone asked me if we will run out of power, if Vlad the Mad cuts all the gas to Western Europe.

This was my reply.

It appears that this year, 3.2 GW of new offshore wind farms could start producing electricity, followed by similar amounts in both 2023 and 2024.

One of those to come on stream about now is the 1.4 GW Hornsea 2 wind farm!

The follow-up 2.9 GW Hornsea 3, signed a contract last week for delivery in 2026/27.

Moray East in Scotland and Triton Knoll off Lincolnshire, are also scheduled to come on stream this year and they’re around 900 MW each.

As someone, who used to write project management software, I hope the companies building these fields have enough resources, in terms of people, boats, cranes and money. But as the companies are all the Shells of the wind industry, I would hope they have got their sums right.

What About The Contracts for Difference Awarded In Allocation Round 4?

We are currently fighting two wars at the moment.

  • The main war in Ukraine, where we are giving that unfortunate country all the help we can.
  • The secondary war in the UK against energy prices.

Would it help our cause in both wars, if we produced more energy?

  • More renewable energy would reduce our dependence on imported gas.
  • The gas saved could go to Europe.
  • Europe would not be buying Vlad the Mad’s bloodstained gas.
  • Replacing gas with solar and wind power might reduce energy prices.

If I put myself in the position of a struggling farmer with a contract for difference to build a solar farm on a poor field, I would want that farm to be earning money as soon as possible.

  • Now that I have the contract can I start assembling that solar farm?
  • Similar arguments can probably be used for onshore wind, which must be easier to assemble, than offshore wind.
  • I don’t think that the hard-pressed energy suppliers would bother, if they received some quality cheap electricity earlier than they expected.
  • Obviously, all the cables and the substations would need to be in place.

So I think that is reasonable to assume, that energy might ramp up quicker than expected.

It could even be more front-loaded, if all the installers got a shift on.

Every little helps!

New Renewable Energy In 2023?

These wind farms are scheduled for commissioning in 2023.

We could see  1.5 GW of offshore wind power commissioned in 2023.

New Renewable Energy In 2024?

These renewable energy sources are scheduled for commissioning in 2024.

  • Seagreen Phase 1 – 1075 MW
  • Dogger Bank A – 1200 MW
  • Round 4 Solar – 125.7 MW

Note, where a windfarm is given a commissioning date of 2023/24  in Wikipedia , I will put it in 2024.

We could see  2400 MW of renewable energy commissioned in 2024.

New Renewable Energy In 2025?

These renewable energy sources are scheduled for commissioning in 2025.

  • Dogger Bank B – 1200 MW
  • Dogger Bank C – 1200 MW
  • Moray West – 1200 MW
  • Round 4 Solar – 1958 MW
  • Round 4 Onshore Wind – 888 MW
  • Round 4 Energy from Waste – 30 MW

We could see  6476 MW of renewable energy commissioned in 2025.

New Renewable Energy In 2026?

These renewable energy sources are scheduled for commissioning in 2026.

  • East Anglia 1 North – 800 MW
  • East Anglia 2 – 900 MW
  • Round 4 Tidal Stream – 5.62 MW

We could see  1705 MW of renewable energy commissioned in 2026.

New Renewable Energy In 2027?

These renewable energy sources are scheduled for commissioning in 2027.

  • Round 4 Tidal Stream – 35.2 MW
  • Round 4 Floating Offshore Wind – 32 MW
  • Round 4 Offshore Wine – 6994 MW

We could see  7061 MW of renewable energy commissioned in 2027.

Too Much Electricity!

Summarising the figures for new capacity gives.

  • 2022 – 3200 MW
  • 2023 – 1500 MW
  • 3024 – 2400 MW
  • 2025 – 6576 MW
  • 2026 – 1705 MW
  • 2027 – 7061 GW

This totals to 22442 MW.

One problem we may have is too much electricity and as we are not blessed with much storage in the UK, where will be able to put it?

In a strange way, Vlad the Mad may solve the problem, by cutting off Europe’s gas.

We have a few interconnectors, where we can export the electricity to allow the Belgians, Dutch, French and the Germans to have a shower.

It looks like construction may be starting soon for another interconnector. NeuConnect will have a capacity of 1.4 GW between the Isle of Grain and Wilhelmshaven.

Conclusion

If I was the German Chancellor, I’d do everything in my power to accelerate the construction of NeuConnect!

July 10, 2022 Posted by | Energy, Energy Storage | , , , , , , , , , , , , | 20 Comments

2.2 GW Of Solar Farms To Be Installed In The UK

This document from the Department of Business, Industry and Industrial Strategy lists all the Contracts for Difference Allocation Round 4 results for the supply of zero-carbon electricity that were announced yesterday.

There were sixty-six solar power projects, that totalled up to 2.2 GW, which gives an average size of 33.3 MW.

  • Many complain that we don’t have enough sun in this country, so surely solar farms totalling up to 2.2 GW is an astonishing figure.
  • For a comparison, Hinckley Point C will supply 3.26 GW.
  • In Cleve Hill Solar Park, I wrote about the largest, which will be a 350 MW solar farm with a 700 MWh battery.
  • Sixty-one are in England, two are in Wales and surprisingly three are in Scotland, So being that far North isn’t as bad for solar power, as you might think.
  • It looks like 251.38 MW are proposed to be installed in 2023/24 and 1958.03 MW in 2024/25.

The Wikipedia entry for Solar Power In The United Kingdom, gives these numbers.

UK solar PV installed capacity at the end of 2017 was 12.8 GW, representing a 3.4% share of total electricity generation. Provisionally, as of the end of January 2019 there was 13,123 MW installed UK solar capacity across 979,983 installations. This is an increase of 323 MW in slightly more than a year. A new record peak generation from photovoltaics was set at 9.68 GW on 20 April 2020.

How many people correctly predicted that the UK would be be generating so much energy from the sun?

How Many Of These Solar Farms Will Be Co-located With Batteries Or Wind Farms?

Consider.

  • Cleve Hill Solar Park will be a 350 MW solar farm, that is co-located with a 700 MWh battery.
  • Is it significant that the battery could supply 350 MW for two hours?
  • It also connects to the grid at the same substation, that connect the London Array offshore wind farm.
  • As substations are complicated and probably expensive bits of electrical gubbins, sharing a substation is probably a good idea to save costs.

I hope that companies like wind and solar farm developers, the National Grid and Network Rail talk a lot to each other, so that efficient infrastructure is developed.

Conclusion

Over the years 2023 to 2025, we should develop these solar farms at a rate of around 0.7 GW per year.

Can we sustain that rate in the future or will we run out of land?

 

July 10, 2022 Posted by | Energy, Energy Storage | , , | 6 Comments

Cleve Hill Solar Park

This document from the Department of Business, Industry and Industrial Strategy lists all the Contracts for Difference Allocation Round 4 results for the supply of zero-carbon electricity that were announced yesterday.

There were sixty-six solar power projects, that totalled up to 2.2 GW, which gives an average size of 33.3 MW.

I looked at the list and found the following.

  • All contracts had the same strike price of £45.99 per MWh.

The largest solar farm with a contract is Cleve Hill Solar Park.

  • ,Cleve Hill Solar Park received a contract for 112 MW.
  • According to Wikipedia, the solar park will have a battery of 700 MWh.
  • Will the battery enable the solar park to supply 112 MW on a twenty-four seven basis?
  • According to Wikipedia, solar farms have a capacity factor of about 10 % in the UK.
  • The Cleve Hill Solar Park will have a capacity of 350 MW.
  • On a typical day, it will generate 350 * 24 *0.1 = 840 MWh
  • The Contract for Difference mechanism  means they get the strike price for each MWh of electricity up to the level in the contract, which is 112 MW.
  • I suspect that for several months of the year, the solar park will be able to supply 112 MW to the grid.
  • I do feel that overnight and on sunless winter days, the system will provide a lot less electricity.
  • This page on the EMR web site explains Contract for Difference mechanism.

This extract from Wikipedia, describes, the solar park’s connection to the National Grid.

Across the marsh run the 400kV powerlines of the national grid. They are supported by eight 40m pylons. There is a large 150/400kV electricity substation at Cleve Hill, serving the London Array offshore wind farm that lies to the north beyond the mouth of the Thames Estuary. The output from the Solar Farm will use this substation to connect to the grid. Here, a battery array will placed, that will charge from the sunlight during the day and release the energy at night when it is needed.

I can build a table showing the earnings on a per day and per year basis, against average output.

  • 20 MW – £22,076.20 per day – £8,057,448 per year
  • 50 MW  – £55,188 per day – £20,143,620 per year
  • 70 MW – £77,263.20 per day – £28,201,068 per year
  • 100 MW  – £110,376 per day – £40,287,240 per year
  • 112 MW – £123,621.12 per day – £45,121,708.80 per year

Note.

  1. I have assumed the year is 365 days.
  2. As a time-expired Control Engineer, I know that the battery can be optimised to supply the electricity, when it is needed and the price is highest.
  3. I wouldn’t be surprised to see co-operation between the London Array and Cleve Hill Solar Farm, as on a sunless but windy day, there may be scope to store excess wind energy in the battery for later release.

On this brief look, it appears that owning a solar farm, can be a nice little-earner.

Thoughts On The Battery

Consider.

  • According to Wikipedia, the solar park will have a battery of 700 MWh.
  • One of the largest lithium batteries in the UK is the one at Clay Tye in Essex, which is just under 200 MWh.

I suspect that lithium ion batteries will not be used.

Highview Power are building a 250 MWh battery in Manchester.

  • This battery will be able to supply 50 MW.
  • The batteries use liquid air as an energy storage medium.
  • The company says the design can be extended up to a GWh by adding more tanks for the liquid air.
  • The only fossil fuels used in Highview’s batteries is probably some lubricating oil.

I feel that a Highview battery or something similar would be an ideal solution at Cleve Hill Solar Farm.

I should be noted that the London Array is a 630 MW wind farm, so the London Array and Cleve Hill Solar Farm have a combined nameplate capacity of 980 MW.

I feel there is a case for a larger battery at the substation, to give the grid an almost-guaranteed GW all day.

It would be large than most if not all gas-fired power stations.

It could be used to balance the grid.

The controlling software would optimise the finances by buying and selling electricity at the right time.

July 9, 2022 Posted by | Energy, Energy Storage | , , , , | 5 Comments

Orbital Marine Power Awarded Two CfDs As Part Of UK Government Renewable Energy Auction

The title of this post, is the same as that of this news item on the Orbital Marine Power web site.

This is the heart of the news item.

Orbital, the renewable energy company focused on the development and global deployment of its pioneering floating tidal stream turbine technology, has been awarded two contracts for difference (CfDs) in the UK Allocation Round 4 (AR4) process.

This is a significant milestone in the company’s growth, with these CfDs underpinning the delivery of multi-turbine projects in Eday, Orkney.

Capable of delivering 7.2MW of predictable clean energy to the grid once completed, these Orbital tidal stream energy projects can power to up to 7,200 homes, supporting the UK’s security of supply, energy transition and broader climate change objectives.

This positive outcome also means Orbital can make a transformative investment in its UK supply chain, with around 150 jobs expected to be created through the manufacture and installation phase alone. On a jobs per MW installed basis, this would represent an unprecedented level of UK role creation for the construction phase of a renewable energy project.

It is good to see tidal power taken seriously.

The Strike Price For Tidal Stream Energy

Consider.

  • Four contracts have been awarded for tidal stream energy.
  • All have strike price of £178.54 per MWh of electricity.
  • This may seem high, as all large wind farms have a strike price of only £37.35 per MWh of electricity.

On the other hand, there is a level playing field for all tidal stream energy developers. Just as there is for large wind farm developers, who have to live with £37.35 per MWh of electricity.

I think it will incentivise the developers and give them a reward for their technology.

All these strike prices are also mapped out for fifteen years, when trying to raise money for your tidal stream gubbins, you will know exactly where you stand.

I’ll give the Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, at least four out of five for their strike price regime!

July 8, 2022 Posted by | Energy | , , | Leave a comment

Norfolk Boreas Offshore Windfarm Contract Awarded

The title of this post, is he same as that of this article on the BBC.

These are the introductory paragraphs.

A government contract has been awarded for the first phase one of the biggest offshore wind zones in the world.

The Norfolk Boreas is expected to secure renewable electricity to meet the needs of around 1.5 million homes, Swedish firm Vattenfall said.

Alongside the Norfolk Vanguard project, it is part of the Norfolk Offshore Wind Zone, which was approved in February.

Together, Norfolk Boreas and Norfolk Vanguard will probably produce over 3 GW of electricity.

July 8, 2022 Posted by | Energy | , , , , | Leave a comment

Ørsted Awarded Contract For World’s Single Biggest Offshore Wind Farm

The title of this post, is the same as that of this press release from Ørsted.

This is the sub-title.

The UK Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) has awarded Ørsted a contract for difference for its Hornsea 3 offshore wind farm. The project was awarded at an inflation-indexed strike price of GBP 37.35 per MWh in 2012 prices.

And this is the first paragraph, which describes the size of the farm.

With a capacity of 2,852 MW, Hornsea 3 will produce enough low-cost, clean, renewable electricity to power 3.2 million UK homes, making a significant contribution to the UK Government’s ambition of having 50 GW offshore wind in operation by 2030 as part of the British Energy Security Strategy. 

This map from Ørsted shows the location of the Hornsea wind farm and its three sections.

Note.

  1. The Hornsea Wind Farm, when fully developed, with a fourth section, is likely to have a capacity of around six GW.
  2. The Lincs, Race Bank and the Westernmost Rough wind farms are about another GW.

Looking at the map, I can see Humberside hosting the world’s largest hydrogen electrolyser to feed into the Humber Zero hydrogen network.

 

July 8, 2022 Posted by | Energy, Hydrogen | , , , , | 2 Comments

The Concept Of Remote Island Wind

This document from the Department of Business, Industry and Industrial Strategy lists all the Contracts for Difference Allocation Round 4 results for the supply of zero-carbon electricity that were announced yesterday.

The contracts have also introduced a concept that is new to me, called Remote Island Wind. All have got the same strike price of £46.39 per MWh.

Two of the projects on Orkney are community projects of around 30 MW, run by local trusts. This is surely, a model that will work in many places.

There is more on Orkney’s Community Wind Farm Project on this page of the Orkney Islands Council web site.

It could even have an electrolyser to provide hydrogen for zero-carbon fuel, when there is more electricity than is needed. Companies like ITM Power and others already build filling stations with an electrolyser, that can be powered by wind-generated electricity.

The other Remote Island Wind projects are larger with two wind farms of over 200 MW.

It does look to me, that the Department of BEIS is nudging wind farm developers in remote places to a model, that all stakeholders w will embrace.

The Viking Wind Farm

I wrote about this wind farm in Shetland’s Viking Wind Farm.

There are more details in this press release from SSE enewables, which is entitled CfD Contract Secured For Viking Energy Wind Farm.

These introductory paragraphs, give a good explanation of the finances of this farm.

SSE Renewables has been successful in the UK’s fourth Contract for Difference (CfD) Allocation Round, announced today, and has secured a low-carbon power contract for 220MW for its wholly-owned Viking Energy Wind Farm (Viking) project, currently being constructed in Shetland.

Viking’s success in securing a contract follows a competitive auction process in Allocation Round 4 (AR4) where it competed within Pot 2 of the allocation round set aside for ‘less established’ technologies including Remote Island Wind.

The 443MW Viking project, which SSE Renewables is currently building in the Shetland Islands, has secured a CfD for 220MW (50% of its total capacity) at a strike price of £46.39/MWh for the 2026/27 delivery year.

The successful project will receive its guaranteed strike price, set on 2012 prices but annually indexed for CPI inflation, for the contracted low carbon electricity it will generate for a 15-year period. Securing a CfD for Viking stabilises the revenue from the project whilst also delivering price security for bill payers.

It’s very professional and open to explain the capacity, the contract and the finances in detail.

The press release also has this paragraph, which details progress.

Viking is progressing through construction with over 50 per cent of turbine foundation bases poured. When complete in 2024, Viking Energy Wind Farm will be the UK’s most productive onshore wind farm in terms of annual electricity output, with the project also contributing to Shetland’s security of supply by underpinning the HVDC transmission link that will connect the islands to the mainland for the first time.

SSE also released this press release, which is entitled Major Milestone Reached As First Subsea Cable Installation Begins On Shetland HVDC Link, where this is the first paragraph.

The first phase of cable laying as part of the SSEN Transmission Shetland High-Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) Link began this week off the coast of Caithness, marking a major milestone in the £660M project.

SSE seem to be advancing on all fronts on the two projects!

The Stornoway Wind Farm

This press release from EDF Renewables is entitled EDF Renewables UK Welcomes Contract for Difference Success, where these are the first two paragraphs.

Two EDF Renewables UK projects bid into the Contract for Difference (CfD) auction round held by the UK Government’s BEIS department have been successful.

The projects are the Stornoway wind farm on the Isle of Lewis and Stranoch wind farm in Dumfries and Galloway. Together these onshore wind farms will provide 300 MW of low carbon electricity which is an important contribution to reaching net zero.

The press release also gives this information about the contract and completion of the Stornoway wind farm.

Stornoway Wind Farm on the Isle of Lewis is a joint venture with Wood. The project has won a CfD for 200 MW capacity, the strike price was £46.39, the target commissioning date is 31 March 2027.

This page on the Lewis Wind Power web site, gives these details of the Stornoway Wind Farm.

The Stornoway Wind Farm would be located to the west of the town of Stornoway in an area close to the three existing wind farm sites.

The project has planning consent for up to 36 turbines and is sited on land owned by the Stornoway Trust, a publicly elected body which manages the Stornoway Trust Estate on behalf of the local community.

The local community stands to benefit as follows:

  • Community benefit payments currently estimated at £900,000 per annum, which would go to an independent trust to distribute to local projects and organisations
  • Annual rental payments to local crofters and the Stornoway Trust – which we estimate could total more than £1.3m, depending on the CfD Strike Price secured and the wind farm’s energy output
  • Stornoway Wind Farm is the largest of the three consented wind farm projects with a grid connection in place and is therefore key to the needs case for a new grid connection with the mainland.  Indeed, the UK energy regulator Ofgem has stated that it will support the delivery of a new 450MW cable if the Stornoway and Uisenis projects are successful in this year’s Contract for Difference allocation round.

Note the last point, where only the Stornoway wind farm was successful.

The Uisenis Wind Farm

This press release from EDF Energy is entitled Lewis Wind Power Buys Uisenis Wind Farm, gives these details of the sale.

Lewis Wind Power (LWP), a joint venture between Amec Foster Wheeler and EDF Energy Renewables has bought the Uisenis Wind Farm project on the Isle of Lewis. The wind farm has planning consent for the development of 45 turbines with a maximum capacity of 162 MW. This would be enough to power 124,000 homes and would be the biggest renewable energy development on the Western Isles.

LWP owns the Stornoway Wind Farm project located around 20km to the north of Uisenis which has planning consent to develop 36 turbines to a maximum capacity of 180 MW – enough to power 135,000 homes.

This would bring Stornoway and Uisenis wind farms under the similar ownership structures.

This is a significant paragraph in the press release.

On behalf of Eishken Limited, the owner of the site where the Uisenis Wind Farm will be located, Nick Oppenheim said: “I am delighted that LWP are taking forward the wind farm. The resources available on the Eishken estate, and the Western Isles in general, means that it is an excellent location for renewable energy projects and, as such, the company is also developing a 300MW pumped storage hydro project immediately adjacent to the Uisenis wind farm. With such potential for renewables and the positive effect they will have on the local community, economy, and the UK as a whole I am are looking forward to positive news on both support for remote island projects and the interconnector.”

Note the mention of pumped storage.

This article on the BBC is entitled Pumped Storage Hydro Scheme Planned For Lewis, where this paragraph introduces the scheme.

A pumped storage hydro scheme using sea water rather than the usual method of drawing on freshwater from inland lochs has been proposed for Lewis.

The only other information is that it will provide 300 MW of power, but nothing is said about the storage capacity.

It looks like Lewis will have a world-class power system.

Mossy Hill And Beaw Field Wind Farms

Mossy Hill near Lerwick and Beaw Field in Yell are two Shetland wind farms being developed by Peel L & P.

This press release from Peel L & P is entitled Government Support For Two Shetland Wind Farms, where these are the first two paragraphs.

Plans for two onshore wind farms on the Shetland Islands which would help meet Scotland’s targets for renewable energy production are a step closer to being delivered after receiving long-term Government support.

Clean energy specialists Peel NRE has been successful in two bids in the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy’s (BEIS) Contracts for Difference (CfD) scheme; one for its Mossy Hill wind farm near Lerwick and the other for Beaw Field wind farm in Yell.

It looks like the two wind farms will power 130,000 houses and are planned to be operational in 2027.

Conclusion

Only time will tell, if the concept of Remote Island Wind works well.

July 8, 2022 Posted by | Energy, Hydrogen | , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments