The Anonymous Widower

From Moorgate To Imperial Wharf – 30th June 2022

I wanted to see the new entrance at Imperial Wharf station today, so after a full English breakfast on Moorgate, I took the Lizzie Line, Central and West London Lines across London.

I took this route.

  • Lizzie Line – Moorgate to Tottenham Court Road
  • Central Line – Tottenham Court Road To Shepherds Bush
  • West London Line – Shepherds Bush To Imperial Wharf

I took these pictures along the route.

Note.

  1. The change at Tottenham Court Road station involves going up to the ticket hall and down again.
  2. The change at Shepherds Bush involves crossing the road between the Central Line and Overground station.
  3. The last few pictures show the new entrance at Imperial Wharf, which is for Northbound trains only.

When Bond Street station opens on the Lizzie Line, it should be easier to change there for the Central Line.

The Plans For A Connection Between The Lizzie And West London Lines?

This map from cartometro.com shows, where the Lizzie and West London Lines cross in the area of Old Oak Common.

Note.

  1. The Overground is shown in orange and splits into the North and West London Lines South of Willesden Junction station.
  2. The Lizzie Line is shown in purple and black, as it goes across the map, as at this point it shares tracks with the Great Western Main Line.

This map shows how High Speed Two will change the lines.


Note.

  1. Hythe Road station on the West London Line, which will have a walking route to High Speed Two and the Lizzie Line.
  2. Old Oak Common Lane station on the North London Line, which will have a walking route to High Speed Two and the Lizzie Line.
  3. The Dudding Hill Line, which is shown as an orange double-line and could be part of the West London Orbital passing North-South to the West of Old Oak Common Lane station.
  4. The Acton-Northolt Line, which is shown in blue and could give Chiltern Railways extra platforms at Old Oak Common with a walking route to High Speed Two and the Lizzie Line.

Wikipedia says that the status of the two Overground stations according to Transport for London is as follows.

Subject to funding being secured and further public consultation, we would seek permission to build and operate the proposals via a Transport and Works Act Order (TWAO). Funding remains a significant constraint in delivering these proposals. We are currently seeking to establish a package of funding that could enable the stations to be delivered by 2026 alongside the new HS2 and Elizabeth line station.

I suspect that with our current South London Mayor, we will see little progress on these connectivity schemes at Old Oak Common station, as with the possible exception of Hythe Road station, there’s little in it for South London.

Conclusion

Hythe Road station would certainly have made my journey easier yesterday.

Hopefully, though, if I do the journey again in the next year or so, Bond Street station will be open on the Lizzie Line and I’ll change to the Central Line there.

 

 

June 30, 2022 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Does The Paddington Bakerloo Line Link Make The Bakerloo Line A NW-SE Cross-Branch Of The Elizabeth Line?

The Elizabeth Line has these major North-South cross-branches.

  • Jubilee Line at Bond Street station.
  • Charing Cross Branch of the Northern Line at Tottenham Court Road station.
  • Thameslink at Farringdon station.
  • Bank Branch of the Northern Line at Moorgate station.
  • East London Line of the Overground at Whitechapel station.

With the opening of the Paddington Bakerloo Line Link, another North-South cross-branch of the Elizabeth Line has been added.

It could be argued that London has a new NW-SE high frequency link between Harrow & Wealdstone and Abbey Wood stations.

  • Bakerloo Line – Harrow & Wealdstone and Paddington
  • Paddington Bakerloo Line Link – 165 metre level step-free walk
  • Elizabeth Line – Paddington and Abbey Wood via Whitechapel and Canary Wharf

The journey would appear to take 73 minutes from the National Rail journey planner, which allows fifteen minutes for the change at Paddington.

May 28, 2022 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Elizabeth Line – Tottenham Court Road Station – 24th May 2022

I took these pictures at the Dean Street entrance to the Elizabeth Line at Tottenham Court Road station.

Note.

  1. The Dean Street entrance is the one to the West at Tottenham Court Road station.
  2. It is perhaps a hundred metres to the East of the large Marks and Spencer at The Pantheon.

I took these pictures from Oxford Street on the 9th of May.

There will be flats on the top of the station, with retail in the front.

Buses On Oxford Street

There are some buses that go along Oxford Street.

  • 55 – Between Walthamstow Central and Oxford Circus
  • 73 – Between Stoke Newington and Oxford Circus
  • 98 – Between Willesden Garage and Holborn
  • 390 – Between Victoria Station and Archway

Note.

  1. I regularly use the 73 to come home from Oxford Street, as it goes close to my house.
  2. Having found how close the 73 bus stop is to the Dean Street entrance to the Elizabeth Line, this might be my easiest route to get to the Western reaches of the Elizabeth Line.
  3. The 73 and 390 buses go between Oxford Circus and Kings Cross stations via Tottenham Court Road, Goodge Street, Warren Street, Euston Square and Euston stations.
  4. The 98 bus runs the full length of Oxford Street.

Step-free buses on Oxford Street are often the easiest way to get where you want to.

May 24, 2022 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , , | Leave a comment

Crossrail is Over Budget And Very Late – But The End Is Nearly In Sight

The title of this post is a quote from this article on the BBC, which is entitled Elizabeth line: The Ambient Detailing Behind Crossrail’s New Stations.

There have been little signs appearing in the last few days.

  • In Is The Paddington Bakerloo Line Link Opening Soon?, it looked like the new tunnel, that will form the Bakerloo Line Link to Crossrail could be opening soon.
  • In The Covers Are Off At Tottenham Court Road Station, it looked like the builders were finishing off Tottenham Court Road station.
  • I go through Moorgate station about six times a week.This morning, as I normally do, I took the rat-up-the-drainpipe route to the surface, that I described in Up From The Depths At Moorgate Station. The escalators have been reversed and there were a lot of staff around.
  • I’ve also seen guys and gals walking around with clipboards.

This all indicates to me that D-Day is not far-off, when passengers will be allowed to set foot on Crossrail’s platforms and trains.

April 13, 2022 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , , , , | 4 Comments

The Covers Are Off At Tottenham Court Road Station

These pictures show some of the new signs at Tottenham Court Road station.

As the covers seem to have been taken off, does that mean that like with cricket, something is about to happen?

April 10, 2022 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , | 3 Comments

Are These Two Good News Articles From Crossrail?

This press release from Crossrail is entitled Tottenham Court Road Elizabeth Line Station Enters Final Commissioning Phase.

These are the first three paragraphs.

The Tottenham Court Road Elizabeth line station has reached an important milestone with construction works sufficiently finished for final commissioning activities to start, Crossrail has confirmed.

The station has reached the T-12 landmark, this means the station is now considered to be 12 weeks away from being ready for handover to Transport for London (TfL), who will operate the Elizabeth line.

Work at the station will now primarily focus on the extensive testing and commissioning of systems ahead of the Elizabeth line opening. The railway is still on track to open in the first half of 2022.

This video from Crossrail explains what needs to be done before Trial Running can start.

This article on New Civil Engineer is entitled Crossrail | All But One Central London Station Is ‘Ready For Use’.

These are the first two paragraphs.

All but one of Crossrail’s central London stations has been signed off as “ready for use”, Crossrail chief executive Mark Wild revealed in his latest update to the London Assembly.

Paddington is the only station yet to have its assets assured and certified as ready to enter trial running.

It looks like Crossrail is finally getting there.

Bond Street Station

In both articles there is no mention of Bond Street station, which in many reports has been described as running behind the other stations.

So when the New Civil Engineer article said that only one station wasn’t ready for use, I assumed it was Bond Street, rather than Paddington, as noted in the article.

So has progress at Bond Street station improved? If it has that that would appear to be more good news.

In Your First Crossrail Service May Arrive In Time For Christmas, I was speculating, when I said.

Bond Street station certainly seems to have caught up with the others and there is no longer any suggestion it could open a year later.

Perhaps, I was right.

Conclusion

The news certainly isn’t bad!

February 20, 2021 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , | 2 Comments

Walking Between Oxford Circus And Tottenham Court Road Stations – 19th February 2021

Today, I walked down Oxford Street from Oxford Circus station to Tottenham Court Road station.

Note the pictures in the middle of the walk of the new Western entrance to Tottenham Court Road station, which will be on Crossrail.

This article on Construction Enquirer is entitled Galliard To Start £55m London Soho Resi Job.

  • 92 flats, a large store and smaller retail spaces.
  • Look at the pictures in the Construction Enquirer article and it looks to be a building that is not out of scale.
  • Ideal for Crossrail and the Northern and Central Line.
  • A hundred metres from the flagship stores of Marks & Spencer and Primark on Oxford Street.
  • All the colour and food of Soho at the back door.
  • Buses outside the front door to Euston, Kings Cross, Paddington and St. Pancras.

Who was it said, that the three most important points about a property are location, location and location?

 

February 20, 2021 Posted by | Transport/Travel, World | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Tottenham Court Road Station – 15th February 2021

These pictures show the latest exterior views of Tottenham Court Road station.

Note.

  1. The development on top of the station will be seven floors.
  2. There is a reflection of Centre Point in the glass.

It has now been handed over to Transport for London.

February 17, 2021 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , | 2 Comments

Tottenham Court Road Western Entrance – 2nd December 2019

These pictures show the new Western entrance to Tottenham Court Road station.

This Google Map shows the location of the massive double-ended station.

Note.

  1. Soho Square is the green space in the middle of the map.
  2. The Eastern entrance to the station is by Centre Point in the North East corner of the map.
  3. The new Western entrance is to the West of the red arrow.

The size of the station is such, that passengers will have to make sure they get out at the right end of the train.

  • For Marks and Spencer at the Pantheon, get out at the Western entrance to the station.
  • For Primark and the other shops clustered around the current station entrance, get out at the Eastern entrance to the station.
  • For Tottenham Court Road, Charing Cross Road, the Dominion Theatre and Centre Point, get out at the Eastern entrance to the station.

A few years ago, a young Crossrail engineer told me, that the stations are very long underground.

Perhaps they should have a directory of all shops, theatres, hotels, attractions and other sites on the platforms, to ensure that passengers use the best entrabce for their destination.

This image shows a visualisation of the station.

Note.

  1. The Westerm entrance is the one on the left.
  2. Centre Point at the Eastern end of the complex, by the Eastern entrance.

The visualisation also shows lots of detail.

The Connecting Tunnel Between The Two Entrances

There appears to be a connecting tunnel between the two entrances.

This pictures show the inside of the Eastern end of the tunnel which has already been built.

Note.

  1. The relatively cramped Central Line platform.
  2. The tunnel has good connections to the Central Line.
  3. It looks like the Western end of the connecting tunnel will be extended towards the Western Entrance.
  4. Obviously, breaking through between the connecting tunnel and its extension, will be one of the last jobs to do.

The completed tunnel will allow the following.

  • Passengers entering the station at either entrance to be able to access the Central Line.
  • Passengers needing to access the Northern Line to be able to enter at the Western Entrance and use the connecting tunnel.

Will this tunnel be a good walking route, when it’s raining cats, dogs and hippopotami on the surface?

Access To Crossrail

Both entrances will have their own step-free access to the Crossrail platforms.

Because Crossrail is at a different level to the Central and Northern Lines, it appears that passengers needing to change to and from Crossrail will probably come to the surface by lift or escalator and then go back down again using a second set.

This may seem to make walking distances longer, but I suspect the following.

  • It makes the station easier to construct.
  • Access to existing lines can be maintained during construction.
  • It allows for the installation of multiple escalators for high capacity.

There are also older stations in London, where there are up and down changes of lines. So perhaps it’s an affordable way of building the connection.

Changes Between Crossrail and The Central Line

Crossrail and the Central Line have several interchanges.

  • Stratford, where the interchange is cross-platform.
  • Liverpool Street
  • Tottenham Court Road
  • Bond Street
  • Ealing Broadway, where the interchange is on the surface. See Crossrail And Ealing Broadway Station for my thoughts on the interchange.

I suspect that there will be a certain amount of ducking and diving by passengers, as they go on their easiest way. Many will probably change at Stratford, as it is a walk across the platform.

Will Tottenham Court Road station see a lot of passengers changing between Crossrail and the Central Line?

I have no idea. But I suspect that Transport for London will be able to make an accurate prediction, based on information from London’s contactless ticketing.

It does look though from the visualisation, that the following can be ascertained.

  • There will be an escalator and a walk to change between Crossrail and the Central Line at Tottenham Court Road station.
  • The change may be easier at the Western end of the Crossrail station.
  • The design of the Central Line with two tunnels close together and not much space for stairs and lifts between them, makes a high-capacity link to the large connecting tunnel difficult to built.
  • There appears to be no provision to extend the connecting tunnel to the West. The original plan was to pedestrianise Oxford Street, but that has been abandoned, due to pressure from residents and Westminster Council.

It is an illustration of the difficulty of connecting to London’s older Underground lines.

Changes Between Crossrail and The Northern Line

Crossrail and the Charing Cross branch of the Northern Line only have the single interchange at Tottenham Court Road station.

  • Does this mean it is expected to be busy, as the Charing Cross branch of the Northern Line serves Euston, Waterloo and will serve the new Battersea extension?
  • From the visualisation, there appear to be lots of connections between Crossrail and the Northern Line at the Eastern entrance.

These pictures show some of the tunnels leading to both Crossrail and the Northern Line at the Eastern entrance.

It looks like Transport for London are expecting a party. But you’ll probably need to be in the Eastern end of the Crossrail trains, to do a fast interchange.

If you get out at the Western end of the train, you’ll have to walk back along the connecting tunnel.

Crossrail 2

Crossrail 2 will complicate and improve things further at Tottenham Court Road station, as it sits between the proposed Crossrail 2 stations of Victoria and the mega-station Euston-St. Pancras-Kings Cross.

Will Cinderella Come To The Rescue?

The Docklands Light Railway (aka Cinderella) was the star of the 2012 Olympics transport system and she now has ambitions to expand to the West, as I wrote about in A Connection Between City Thameslink Station And The Docklands Light Railway.

This map from Transport for London, shows the possible Western extension of the DLR.

With all the problems of the funding of Crossrail 2, this extension could create a lot of important connections across the City.

It already connects or will soon connect.

  • Canary Wharf and Bank
  • City Airport and Bank
  • Crossrail’s South Eastern Branch and Bank, with a change at Custom House station.

The upgrade at Bank, which should complete in a couple of years will help, with better connections to the Central, Circle, District and Northern Lines.

If the extension to the DLR is built, it would connect Canary Wharf, City Airport and Crossrail’s South Eastern Branch in the East, with Charing Cross, Euston, Kings Cross, St. Pancras, Thameslink and Victoria in the West.

It would also take the pressure off of some of Central London’s most crowded lines.

So get your coal shovel out Cindy and start digging!

 

December 5, 2019 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , , | 3 Comments

Galliard Homes To Develop £140m Luxury Flat Complex Above Crossrail Station

The title of this post is the same as that of this article on City AM.

This is yet another Crossrail related development.

November 13, 2019 Posted by | Transport/Travel, World | , , | Leave a comment