The Anonymous Widower

Silvertown Tunnel Bus Network Proposals

This web page is the Silvertown Tunnel Bus Network Proposals.

These proposals are made.

  • A new high frequency, limited stop service between Grove Park and Canary Wharf referred to in this consultation as route X239
  • To extend route 129 (Lewisham – North Greenwich) north across the river to Great Eastern Quay via the Royal Docks development zone
  • A minor change to route 108 so that it uses the new Millennium Way slip road to exit the Blackwall Tunnel southbound
  • We are also seeking your views on route options for three sections of routes 129 and X239.

It looks like route 108 will continue to use the current stop.

The proposals include this map.

I copied this map from the TfL web site, as they don’t provide one for people who want or need to use it.

These are my observations.

The 108 Bus

The 108 seems to be more or less as now and will be continue to be run by a single-decker bus, as double-decker buses can’t use the Blackwall Tunnel.

North of the Thames, the 108 calls at these stations.

  • Stratford International for DLR and National Rail.
  • Stratford for DLR, Central, Elizabeth and Jubilee Lines, and National Rail.
  • Bow Church for DLR
  • Devons Road for DLR
  • Langdon Park for the DLR
  • Bazely Street (All Saints) for DLR

South of the Thames, the 108 calls at these stations.

  • North Greenwich for the Jubilee Line.
  • Westcombe Park for National Rail
  • Blackheath for National Rail
  • Lewisham for DLR and National Rail

Note.

  1. It is possible to go between Lewisham and Stratford on the DLR with a change at Canary Wharf.
  2. It is possible to go between North Greenwich and Stratford on the Jubilee Line.
  3. Westcombe Park station is on the Greenwich Line.

I would wonder, if many people use this bus route for long distances.

The 129 Bus

Note.

  1. The 129 appears to connect Lewisham and Greenwich to the City Airport and the Becton branch of the DLR.
  2. Many journeys on the 129 bus, might be easier using the DLR, with a change at Westferry or Poplar, which is probably what travellers do now.
  3. The 129 bus is shown on the map with a stop at Silvertown. Does that mean that it could connect with a Silvertown station on the Elizabeth Line?
  4. As the 129 bus will pass through the larger Silvertown Tunnel, it could be a double-decker route, instead of the current single-decker.

North of the Thames, the 129 calls at these stations.

  • Gallions Reach for the DLR
  • Beckton for the DLR
  • Royal Albert for the DLR
  • London City Airport for the DLR
  • Silvertown
  • Pontoon Dock for the DLR
  • West Silvertown for the DLR

South of the Thames, the 129 calls at these stations.

  • North Greenwich for the Jubilee Line.
  • Cutty Sark for DLR
  • Greenwich for DLR and National Rail
  • Lewisham for DLR and National Rail

Would improvements and a frequency increase to the DLR and the building of Silvertown station, mean that changes to the 129 bus route, would not be so important?

The X329 Bus

Note.

  1. Canary Wharf must be served and starting at Westferry Circus is probably a good choice.
  2. But is Grove Park station, the ideal Southern terminal?
  3. Not stopping the X329 bus at North Greenwich is probably correct, as North Greenwich station is a large Jubilee Line and bus interchange close to the O2.

North of the Thames, the X329 calls at these stations.

  • Canary Wharf for DLR and Elizabeth and Jubilee Lines

South of the Thames, the X329 calls at these stations.

  • Blackheath for National Rail
  • Lee for National Rail
  • Grove Park for National Rail

Note.

  1. Blackheath station is on the Bexleyheath and North Kent Lines.
  2. Lee station is on the Dartford Loop Line.
  3. Grove Park station is on the South Eastern Man Line.
  4. Grove Park has a bus station, where there could be space for a battery charger for electric buses.

The X329 seems to have been partly designed on the premise, that an express bus should be run through the Silvertown Tunnel. But it does connect four of the rail lines going into London terminals to Canary Wharf.

Silvertown Station For London City Airport

Silvertown station would more than double the number of stations with easy routes to the London City Airport.

The Elizabeth Line would enable the direct connection that is needed to Canary Wharf, the City of London, Heathrow, Liverpool Street and Paddington stations and the West End.

  • A single change at Abbey Wood, would give access to much of Kent.
  • A single change at Farringdon, would give access to Thameslink services and Gatwick and Luton airports.
  • Around 2030, a single change at Old Oak Common, would give access to High Speed Two services.
  • A single change at Paddington, would give access to Wales and West services.
  • A single change at Whitechapel, would give access to the great circle of the London Overground.

I believe the case for a Silvertown station with at least a good walking route to the London City Airport is strong, and the station would be a marvellous asset for Silvertown and the Airport.

 

January 7, 2023 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Passenger Tunnel Linings At Waterloo Underground Station

This pictures show the cast-iron pedestrian tunnel linings at Waterloo tube station.

The Jubilee Line opened in 1999.

In the last few years, concrete has been able to be 3D-printed, so it can now be produced in different shapes.

All these wall and roof panels on the Elizabeth Line were made by 3D-printing of concrete.

Conclusion

Design has progressed in 25 years.

December 29, 2022 Posted by | Design, Transport/Travel | , , | Leave a comment

The Northern End Of The Silvertown Tunnel

This map from OpenRailwayMap shows the Northern end of the Silvertown Tunnel.

Note.

  1. The two dotted white lines show the route of the Silvertown Tunnel.
  2. The green lines are the Docklands Light Railway.
  3. The Northern green line is the Beckton branch.
  4. The Southern green line is the Woolwich Arsenal branch.
  5. The two silver-grey lines that loop across the top part of the map are the Jubilee Line.
  6. Canning Town Station is in the North-West corner of the map.
  7. The pair of cream lines across the map to the South of Canning Town station are the tunnels of the Elizabeth Line.
  8. The black dotted line going across the South-East corner of the map is the cable car.

This Google Map shows vaguely the same area.

Note.

  1. Canning Town station at the North of the map in the middle.
  2. The dual carriage road running NW-SE past Canning Town station, is numbered A1011 in the North-West and A1020 in the South-East.
  3. The A1011 crosses over a roundabout and the Beckton branch of the DLR on a flyover.
  4. The roundabout is the Tidal Basin Roundabout, which will be the Northern connection of the Silvertown Tunnel.
  5. The road running West from the roundabout is the Lower Lea Crossing, which leads to Canary Wharf and the City.
  6. The water to the right, is the Royal Victoria Dock.
  7. The Royal Docks cable car station can be seen in the North-West corner of the dock.
  8. The new City Hall is between the cable car and the A1011.

Comparing the two maps, it appears that the Silvertown Tunnel will emerge somewhere in the cleared land to the West of the A1011.

This second Google Map shows the Tidal Basin roundabout, City Hall and the Royal Docks cable car station.

I took these pictures of the area from the cable-car yesterday.

Note.

  1. The cable-car wasn’t busy.
  2. I was sitting alone on the Western side of the car.

I have some thoughts about the Silvertown Tunnel.

The Silvertown Tunnel Is Convenient For The New City Hall

From the Google Map, I included earlier, it looks like City Hall is on a loop from the Tidal Basin Roundabout.

it is also especially convenient for those members and officials who live in South London, who will just nip through the new tunnel.

I suspect that limousine access for the great and good to the old City Hall wasn’t as good.

The Obvious Truck Route To The City of London From the Channel Tunnel Will Be To Use The Silverton Tunnel

Recently. I have been watching the construction of 22 Ropemaker Street and I have surprised at how many large components for this building have come in by truck from Europe.

As they seem to arrive overnight, they are probably sneaked in by a secret route like the A13 to avoid a crossing of the River.

As Blackwall and Rotherhithe Tunnels don’t have a high clearance, could these components come into City through the Silvertown Tunnel.

I certainly feel that large truck access to Central London, is the major reason for building the Silvertown Tunnel.

But will large numbers of trucks using the Silverton Tunnel increase congestion on the roads in East London?

As Hackney and Newham are against the Silvertown Tunnel, I suspect they expect lots of traffic to be generated.

Will Satellite Navigation Systems Recommend Using The Silvertown Tunnel?

Of course they will and I suspect when the Northern section of the M25 is congested, vehicles will be sent through the Silvertown Tunnel and London to go North. I must admit, that my brain has sent me on that route to get through London, when the M25 is congested. But then I would generally have been driving a nippy Jaguar estate car, that could use Rotherhithe Tunnel or the bridges in Central London.

 

December 25, 2022 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Southern End Of The Silvertown Tunnel

This map from OpenRailwayMap shows the Southern end of the Silvertown Tunnel.

Note.

  1. The O2 Arena at the top of the map in the middle.
  2. The blue arrow below it, which indicates North Greenwich station.
  3. The two dotted white lines show the route of the Silvertown Tunnel.
  4. The two silver-grey lines that loop across the top part of the map are the Jubilee Line.
  5. The black dotted line between the Jubilee Line and the Silvertown Tunnel is the cable car.

This second OpenRailwayMap shows the Silvertown Tunnel’s junction with the approach to the Blackwall Tunnel.

Note.

  1. The two dotted white lines show the route of the Silvertown Tunnel.
  2. Studio 338, which is a music and arts venue, is indicated by the double quaver.
  3. The site to the North of Studio 338 is labelled the East Greenwich Gas Works.
  4. The roads to the Northbound tunnel bores of both tunnels, split to the West of Studio 338.
  5. The roads from the Northbound tunnel bores of both tunnels, join to the West of Studio 338.

This Google Map shows the same area as the previous map.

Note.

  1. Studio 338 is clearly marked.
  2. To its North is a circular structure on the site labelled as the East Greenwich Gas Works on the previous map.
  3. Could this be the remains of a gas holder?

Could it be that the works to the West of the circular structure are the start of tunneling?

Conclusion

It looks to me, that the designers of the Silvertown Tunnel have been able to squeeze in a junction between the approaches to the two tunnels, that should be fairly free-flowing.

 

December 25, 2022 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , , , , | 4 Comments

So Many Cases On A Train!

This afternoon about three, I went to West Ealing station to see what it was like to transfer between the Elizabeth Line Central Tunnel and the Western Branch at Paddington.

Coming back, I took an Elizabeth Line service that had started from Heathrow Airport and it was one of the busiest Lizzies, I’d ever ridden!

To get on the train at West Ealing station, I got in to probably coach 4 of 9, as that was in the dry and the back end of the train I needed for Moorgate station was certainly in the wet.

I then had to walk half the length of the train to get to the back of the train.

It was not easy, as the train was full of scores of passengers with large wheelie cases.

This got me thinking.

Are Passengers Transferring To The Lizzie Line?

And especially those with large cases. that are the sort you could use for bringing in a pair of folded-up contortionists.

  • These cases don’t fit well on the Piccadilly Line, which has only a few step-free stations.
  • From what I’ve seen cases are easily wheeled to Elizabeth Line platforms at Heathrow.
  • Many of these cases won’t fit in the average family car.
  • All parking is expensive at Heathrow, whether it is short, medium or long.
  • Valet parking at Heathrow has been devalued by all the scam artists.
  • Taxis are the province of those that own oil wells, hedge funds or belong to the highest wunch of bankers.
  • Pick-up and drop-off is now very expensive.
  • There were a good proportion of couples, who were both dragging or pushing a massive case.
  • The Elizabeth Line is cheaper than the Heathrow Express.
  • The Elizabeth Line like the Piccadilly Line allows the use of a bank card as a ticket.
  • Only the Elizabeth and Piccadilly Lines take you direct to dozens of stations with only same-platform interchanges.
  • The Elizabeth Line has step-free interchanges with the Bakerloo, Circle, District, Hammersmith and City, Jubilee, and Metropolitan Lines, the Docklands Light Railway and the London Overground.
  • Whitechapel has been turned into a major transport hub for the Easternmost part of London.

There seems to be quite a few reasons why a traveller going to or from Heathrow might at least try the Elizabeth Line.

And travellers seemed to be doing it in droves today!

Were Upmarket Passengers Using The Lizzie Line?

Take the couple next to me on the train from West Ealing.

  • Around sixty.
  • Very well-dressed.
  • Possibly Mediterranean or South American.
  • Matching medium-size wheelie-cases.
  • She was wearing expensive glasses.

A couple of years ago, they would have probably used the Heathrow Express.

They certainly weren’t the only passengers, who looked like archetypal Heathrow Express passengers.

Will The Lizzie Line Take Passengers From The Piccadilly Line?

As the cost will be the same, I suspect the answer will be yes.

Although, there will be groups of travellers, who will probably remain loyal to the Piccadilly Line.

  • If you were going to or from the step-free Cockfosters or Oakwood, with a heavy case, all the way on the Piccadilly Line could be a simple sensible option. I used to live near Oakwood station and remember several long trips on the Piccadilly Line, but not too Heathrow.
  • The step-free Kings Cross St. Pancras, Green Park, Knightsbridge and Earls Court may well have reasons to keep their regular passengers.
  • Those only travelling a few stops to or from Heathrow will probably stay with the Piccadilly Line for convenience.
  • Transport for London have been adding step-free access to the Heathrow Branch and this will surely promote use.

The Piccadilly Line is also getting new trains in a few years.

In Extending The Elizabeth Line – Piccadilly Line To Ealing Broadway, I talked about a proposal to turnback some Piccadilly Line trains at Ealing Broadway station.

I think it is a good idea, as it could make it simpler for Piccadilly Line passengers to access Heathrow and reduce congestion on the Piccadilly Line.

Will The Lizzie Line Take Passengers From The Heathrow Express?

This is an extract from Extending The Elizabeth Line – Piccadilly Line To Ealing Broadway

It will be difficult to predict what will happen to Heathrow Express, but I suspect several groups of passengers will desert it.

  • Passengers wanting to go anywhere East of Paddington without changing trains.
  • Passengers wanting any Elizabeth Line station.
  • Passengers, who don’t like the prices of Heathrow Express.
  • Passengers using Oyster or contactless cards.
  • Passengers who want to ride on London’s spectacular new Elizabeth Line.

After Old Oak Common station is opened for High Speed Two, the numbers could further decrease.

Will Heathrow Express survive?

Will The Lizzie Line Attract Passengers Who Usually Drive?

Large swathes of the country already have single-change step-free access to the Elizabeth Line.

  • All services out of Liverpool Street and/or Stratford.
  • All services out of Moorgate.
  • All Thameslink services through Farringdon.
  • All services out of Paddington.
  • All services through Abbey Wood.
  • When Crossrail to Ebbsfleet (C2E) opens, this will add all services through Gravesend and Ebbsfleet.
  • When High Speed Two opens, this will add all services through Old Oak Common.
  • When the Western Rail Approach To Heathrow is completed, this will add all services through Reading.

If you can get a train direct to the Elizabeth Line network and then a train direct to your terminal, would you seriously want all the hassle of parking after a two hour drive?

I can see parking at Heathrow suffering a severe lack of demand.

Conclusion

Lizzie will start a revolution in travel to and from Heathrow.

November 7, 2022 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

From October 24th 2022, It Looks Like Bond Street And Oxford Circus Stations In London Will Share An Out Of Station Interchange!

Consider.

  • Bond Street station is served by the Jubilee and Central Lines.
  • Oxford Circus station is served by the Victoria, Bakerloo and Central Lines.
  • On this page on Oyster Fares Central, the distance between Bond Street And Oxford Circus stations, is given as 280 metres or yards.
  • On the 24th of October 2022, Bond Street station on the Elizabeth Line will open with two new entrances in Davies Street and Hanover Square.
  • Westminster City Council have refurbished Hanover Square to improve walking routes to and from the Hanover Square entrance to Bond Street Station.
  • In Hanover Square – 9th May 2022, I show some of the wide pavements around the area.
  • There is no direct interchange between the Victoria and Elizabeth Lines.
  • There is no direct interchange between the Piccadilly and Elizabeth Lines.

I think it is likely, that some travellers will walk between Oxford Street station and the Hanover Street entrance at Bond Street station, to do journeys like these.

  • Victoria Line stations and Elizabeth Line stations
  • Piccadilly Line stations, that are North of Finsbury Park station and Elizabeth Line stations, with a cross-platform change between Piccadilly and Victoria Line trains at Finsbury Park station.
  • Some travellers may prefer this interchange between Bakerloo Line stations and Elizabeth Line stations, than use the Bakerloo Line Link at Paddington.
  • Some travellers arriving in Euston, King’s Cross and St. Pancras may use the Victoria Line to transfer to the Elizabeth Line.

I can see a substantial number of travellers walking between Oxford Street station and the Hanover Street entrance at Bond Street station.

I suspect Transport for London can too, as they have made Bond Street and Oxford Circus stations an out of station interchange, with a time limit of twenty minutes.

  1. It would be time enough to pick up a coffee on the way.
  2. As Tony Hancock once said, there would be time for a cough and a drag.
  3. There are several useful shops on the route.

It is not your normal interchange and I suspect shops will adjust their wares to the traffic.

I have a few thoughts.

Toilets

I think toilets are needed on the pedestrian route.

Interchange With The Central Line At Bond Street Station

Consider.

  • From West to East the Elizabeth Line has interchanges with the Central Line at Ealing Broadway, Bond Street, Tottenham Court Road, Liverpool Street and Stratford.
  • Passengers for stations like Notting Hill Gate, Marble Arch, Holborn, St. Paul’s and Bank will have a large choice of new routes.

I suspect many passengers will change at Bond Street and Stratford. Stratford is an easy interchange, but how good will Bond Street be?

This visualisation shows the knitting that connects the lines at Bond Street station.

I think for a fast interchange, using the minimum amount of walking, you would need to travel in the Western end of an Elizabeth Line train if you want to change to the Central Line.

But some passengers might prefer to travel in the Eastern end of an Elizabeth Line train and use the out of station interchange to Oxford Circus station for the Central Line.

Interchange With The Jubilee Line At Bond Street Station

Consider.

  • From West to East the Elizabeth Line has interchanges with the Jubilee Line at just Bond Street and Stratford.
  • Passengers for stations like Green Park, Westminster, Waterloo, London Bridge and Greenwich will take the Jubilee Line.

Passengers will have to change at Bond Street or Stratford. Stratford is an easy interchange, but how good will Bond Street be?

October 22, 2022 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

I Can’t Wait Until The Sixth Of November

This morning, I wanted to go between Moorgate and Romford stations.

Because the Elizabeth Line is not fully joined up, I wanted to avoid a long walk.

So I had decided, that the best way to go would be.

  • Hammersmith and City Line from Moorgate to Mile End.
  • Central Line from Mile End to Stratford.
  • Elizabeth Line from Stratford to Romford.

Note that both interchanges are cross-platform ones, so it is certainly a route with the minimum of walking.

When I got to Moorgate station, it appeared that there were problems with the Hammersmith and City Line, so assuming that things would be OK from Whitechapel, I took the Lizzie Line one stop to try my luck from there.

But my luck was out and after waiting for about twenty minutes in a stationary District Line train for a lift to Mile End station, I gave up and returned to the Lizzie Line, where I took a train to Canary Wharf station.

I’d changed between the Lizzie and Jubilee Lines before and wrote about it in Changing Trains At Canary Wharf Station – 13th June 2022.

I had not been impressed, as I’d found it a long walk.

But this time, I followed a route between the Eastern ends of both stations, which goes past Waitrose in the shopping centre. Opposite Waitrose was this stall.

That looks good for a pit stop. Badiani 1932 appear to have realised that London has a chronic shortage of ice cream and have opened a number of shops.

Once on the Jubilee Line, I finally got to Stratford and walked to the Lizzie Line for Romford Station.

What Had Caused All The Delays?

It appeared there had been a power supply problem on the Hammersmith and City Line.

Conclusion

Once Crossrail is fully open, it will be a bypass around problems like today.

 

August 31, 2022 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Using The Elizabeth Line Between London City And Heathrow Airports

Today, I went from London City Airport to Heathrow using the Docklands Light Railway, the underground section of the Elizabeth Line and Heathrow Express.

London City Airport And Poplar Stations

I took these pictures on this section of the route using the Docklands Light Railway.

Note.

  1. I started my journey at 13:15.
  2. I arrived at Poplar at 13:27.
  3. The journey took twelve minutes, which agrees with the timetable.

This is a route, that gives a view of London’s rebuilding in the East.

Poplar And Canary Wharf Stations

I walked this section.

Note.

  1. I started my walk from Poplar station at 13:27.
  2. I was on the platform at Canary Wharf station at 13:39.
  3. I used a lift at Poplar station and the escalators at Canary Wharf station.
  4. The walk took twelve minutes, but it was a roundabout route.
  5. It looks like a level walkway is to be built between the two stations.

This Google Map shows the are between the two stations.

Note.

  1. Poplar station in the North-East of the map.
  2. The bridge at Poplar station, that provides the route I took over Aspen Way.
  3. After crossing the bridge and using the lift, I walked along the South side of Aspen Way.
  4. I then walked South down the path at the East side of the site, where it appears from the hoardings, flats will be built.
  5. Finally, I turned left to walk along the dock and then right to cross into Canary Wharf station.

Work appears to have started at Canary Wharf on the Southern end of an extended walkway, that will link to the bridge over Aspen Way.

This direct route could be nearly two hundred metres shorter and would shorten the connection by several minutes.

Canary Wharf And Paddington Stations

This section of the journey took nineteen minutes and I arrived at Paddington at 13:58, as this picture shows.

It had taken forty-three minutes between London City Airport and Paddington stations.

Paddington And Heathrow Airport By Heathrow Express

I took the 14:10 Heathrow Express to the Airport and took these pictures.

Note.

  1. It took about six minutes to walk between the Elizabeth Line and Heathrow Express.
  2. This was my first ride on Heathrow Express, since the service has started using Class 387 trains.
  3. The trains are fine, but where are the tables, that I like so much in the other Class 387 trains?
  4. The train arrived at Heathrow Central at 14:29.

This meant my journey between the two airports had taken an hour and fourteen minutes.

Canary Wharf to Heathrow using Heathrow Express and the Elizabeth Line had taken thirty-four minutes.

Return To Paddington On The Elizabeth Line

I came back from Heathrow on an Elizabeth Line train, which took 29 minutes.

That would mean that today using the Elizabeth Line to Heathrow.

  • Heathrow and Canary Wharf will take 48 minutes.
  • Heathrow and London City Airport will take one hour and twenty-nine minutes.

The difference in time between the two trains is solely down to the times of the Heathrow Express and the Elizabeth Line trains between Paddington and Heathrow.

What Difference Will A Direct Elizabeth Line Connection Make?

Canary Wharf are giving a figure of thirty-nine minutes between Canary Wharf and Heathrow, when the Elizabeth Line fully opens.

This would appear to indicate that fully opening the Elizabeth Line connection at Paddington will save nine minutes and the Elizabeth Line will only be a few minutes slower than Heathrow Express, if you can cut out the change at Paddington.

This table compares times between Canary Wharf and Heathrow.

  • Elizabeth Line with a change at Paddington – 48 minutes
  • Elizabeth Line and Heathrow Express with a change at Paddington – 34 minutes
  • Elizabeth Line direct – 39 minutes

How many passengers will swap from Heathrow Express to a complete Elizabeth Line?

Is There Going To Be A Pedestrian Bridge Between Poplar And Canary Wharf Stations?

This Google Map shows the bridge that leads South from Canary Wharf station.

Note how the bridge could have been designed to go through the station to the housing to the North and perhaps ultimately to Poplar DLR station.

These pictures show the complete bridge on the South side and what could be the start of construction on the North side.

Note.

  1. This pictures were taken on two dates.
  2. A full bridge would connect the new housing to the shopping centre and the Jubilee Line station.
  3. Between Poplar and Canary Wharf stations would be around 120 metres.
  4. There would be a straight and level walking route between Poplar DLR station and the two Canary Wharf Jubilee and Elizabeth Line stations.
  5. A short branch would lead to Canary Wharf DLR station.
  6. Stairs would lead to the buses that run through Canary Wharf.

It does appear that the North and South bridges will form a continuous straight route.

The bridge would create a comprehensive transport interchange for East London.

 

 

 

 

June 16, 2022 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Changing Trains At Canary Wharf Station – 13th June 2022

I took these pictures around the new Canary Wharf station on the Elizabeth Line.

Note.

  1. The station appears to follow, a very similar design to some of stations on the Jubilee Line.
  2. Changing to various lines at Canary Wharf would appear to be a bit of a walk, that is very much in line with say a connection between the Jubilee Line and the Docklands Light Railway.
  3. The connection to the Jubilee Line appears to be a tunnel under the offices.
  4. For West India Quay DLR station, you walk along the dock.

These are some of the routes that you would use from Canary Wharf.

  • Bank – DLR
  • Battersea Power Station – DLR – Change at Bank – Northern Line
  • Clapham Junction – Elizabeth Line – Change at Whitechapel – East London Line
  • Croydon – Elizabeth Line – Change at Whitechapel – East London Line
  • Crystal Palace – Elizabeth Line – Change at Whitechapel – East London Line
  • Enfield – Elizabeth Line – Change at Liverpool Street – Enfield Town or Cheshunt Line
  • Euston – DLR – Change at Bank – Northern Line
  • Heathrow Airport – Elizabeth Line
  • King’s Cross – DLR – Change at Bank – Northern Line
  • Liverpool Street – Elizabeth Line
  • London Bridge – Jubilee Line
  • London City Airport – Jubilee Line – Change at Canning Town – DLR
  • Marylebone – Elizabeth Line – Change at Paddington – Bakerloo Line
  • Moorgate – Elizabeth Line
  • Paddington – Elizabeth Line
  • St. Pancras – DLR – Change at Bank – Northern Line
  • Victoria – DLR – Change at Bank – District/Circle Line
  • Walthamstow – Elizabeth Line – Change at Liverpool Street – Chingford Line
  • Waterloo – Jubilee Line

Note.

  1. The new escalator connection between the DLR and the Northern Line at Bank station will enable easier journeys to Euston, King’s Cross, St. Pancras and many other Northern Line stations.
  2. The excellent connection between the Elizabeth Line and the East London Line at Whitechapel station, will get a lot of use.
  3. The DLR features in several routes, including the important one to London City Airport.

In A Short Cruise At Greenwich, I said this about the DLR.

The Docklands Light Railway is often thought by Londoners, commuters and visitors as a bit of a Cinderella.

However, like Cinderella she works hard all day and provides reliable and efficient transport, where the only alternatives are buses, bicycles, taxis and Shank’s pony.

Just after the 2012 Olympics, I met a big cheese in Transport for London on a DLR train. He felt that the DLR had been the star in getting everybody to the games.

It must be one of the most successful light railways in the world!

And yet, no-one has ever thought to build another running on the same principles.

So why does it work so well?

This article on Intelligent Transport is entitled Celebrating 30 years Of The DLR, where this is said, under a heading of Customer Satisfaction.

One of the biggest successes of the DLR over the last 30 years has been its high levels of reliability, with over 99% of its trains departing on time.

The DLR has also had consistently good feedback and engagement with its customers, with high satisfaction ratings averaging at 89 out of 100.

Do these numbers mean that people trust Cinderella  and will trust her to get through even in the most difficult of circumstances?

Conclusion

Canary Wharf station could develop into a very important interchange.

June 13, 2022 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Does The Paddington Bakerloo Line Link Make The Bakerloo Line A NW-SE Cross-Branch Of The Elizabeth Line?

The Elizabeth Line has these major North-South cross-branches.

  • Jubilee Line at Bond Street station.
  • Charing Cross Branch of the Northern Line at Tottenham Court Road station.
  • Thameslink at Farringdon station.
  • Bank Branch of the Northern Line at Moorgate station.
  • East London Line of the Overground at Whitechapel station.

With the opening of the Paddington Bakerloo Line Link, another North-South cross-branch of the Elizabeth Line has been added.

It could be argued that London has a new NW-SE high frequency link between Harrow & Wealdstone and Abbey Wood stations.

  • Bakerloo Line – Harrow & Wealdstone and Paddington
  • Paddington Bakerloo Line Link – 165 metre level step-free walk
  • Elizabeth Line – Paddington and Abbey Wood via Whitechapel and Canary Wharf

The journey would appear to take 73 minutes from the National Rail journey planner, which allows fifteen minutes for the change at Paddington.

May 28, 2022 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment