The Anonymous Widower

How Leeds Bradford Airport Can Be Catalyst For Green Aviation

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on the Yorkshire Post.

The article was written by a geography student from Yorkshire, who is studying at Cambridge University.

He makes some interesting points.

  • Leeds Airport is not a good customer experience.
  • Manchester Airport will take passengers away from Leeds.
  • Leeds is the biggest financial centre in the UK outside London.
  • Leeds Airport should be improved to the highest environmental standards.
  • Aviation biofuels should be provided.
  • Short haul flights should be replaced by a train journey if possible.
  • By 2030, a lot of short haul flights will be replaced by electric aircraft.

I agree with a lot of what he says.

There will still be a need to fly and we must make it as environmentally-friendly as possible.

If we don’t find ways of making flying carbon-neutral, we’ll hurt the economy.

 

 

June 28, 2020 Posted by | Finance, Transport, World | , , , , | Leave a comment

Ashington Blyth and Tyne Line Reopening Mulled Over In Six ‘Quick Win’ Rail Projects For Northern Transport

The title of this post is the same as that of this article on Rail Technology Magazine.

This is the first paragraph.

A series of ‘quick wins’ have been identified to fix the “current crisis” in the north’s transport network in a report by the IPPR.

What are the quick wins?

This page on the IPPR website gives access to the report which is entitled Quick Wins For The North’s Transport Network.

These quick wins are given in the report.

Reopening Of The Ashington, Blyth And Tyne Railway For Passenger Services

This summary is given.

North of Newcastle, and along the North East coast, there is an area with great potential but numerous challenges. This area contains several small and medium-sized towns: Blyth (population 37,000) and Ashington (population 28,000) are the largest (Centre for Towns 2017). The public sector dominates in terms of employment (education, health and public administration provide one-quarter of jobs), and the areas’ private sector is largely in the ‘everyday economy’ of retail (5,900 jobs) and food and beverage services (4,130 jobs) (ONS 2018c). The Port of Blyth handles 2 million tonnes of freight each year, and there are some significant development sites for renewable energy in the area (Port of Blyth 2018).

The history of the area is a vital consideration for its transport infrastructure. The area boomed during the industrial revolution as coal mining and port towns grew – Ashington was once considered the world’s largest coal-mining village (Whitfield 2018). The Ashington-Blyth and Tyne railway line once connected a number of Northumberland settlements between Ashington and Newcastle – it was not a single route, but a small network, built in 1840 to link the collieries to the River Tyne, and was opened up to passengers in 1841 (NCC 2015). But in 1964, passenger services were withdrawn under the ‘Beeching Axe’,although it has remained open for freight.

This idea has been talked about for years and I wrote about it in Northumberland Unveils £3.5m Rail Project To Bring Back Passenger Services.

This is a project, where it is probably time to stop talking and get the planning started, before updating the railways.

Surely, if it can be done for £3.5m, it must be good value. I suspect it will cost more, but not as much as Network Rail’s estimate of £191m.

Leeds/Bradford Airport Parkway Rail Station

Consider.

  • Leeds Bradford Airport handles four million passengers per year.
  • It has no direct rail access.
  • It has direct services to airports like New York.
  • It connects via hub airports like Heathrow and Schipol to a wide number of destinations.
  • It could capture more of the localo air passengers with better connections.

The proposal is to build a Parkway station the Harrogate Line, between Horsforth station and Bramhope Tunnel.

  • It would be a 1.3 kilometre drive in a shuttle bus to the Airport.
  • The station would serve as a Park-and-Ride station for Leeds, Harrogate and other destinations.

This Google Map shows the area.

Note.

  1. The Airport is in the North-West corner.
  2. Horsforth station is in the South-East corner.
  3. The Harrogate Line runs North South from Horsforth station.

The new Park-and-Ride station could be built on any convenient location near to the Airport.

It looks to be a simple plan, that has been costed at £23m.

Consider these points about the Harrogate Line.

  • It is only thirty-six miles.
  • Services take around seventy minutes between Leeds and York via Harrogate
  • It appears to be double-track
  • The operating speed is sixty mph between Leeds and Harrogate.
  • It doesn’t appear to be very busy.

I suspect it would be a good idea to iimprove this line, so that Northern’s Class 170 trains can stretch their legs.

If there was a Park-and-Ride station at Leeds Bradford Airport would First TransPennine want to run a service to the Airport?

I can see this plan, stimulating a lot of rail improvements between Leeds and York.

Supporting The Development Of Hydrogen Trains

The IPPR report says this.

Transport for the North plans to work toward the roll-out of hydrogen trains.

Consider.

  • The North has a lot of routes, where hydrogen-powered trains could be used.
  • Alstom are converting trains to hydrogen-power at Widnes in the North-West.
  • Hydrogen is or can be produced by petro-chemical companies in the North.

I feel that increasingly, the North will have another big problem, for which hydrogen could be a solution.

Currently, there is a massive expansion of offshore windpower, which will produce a lot of electricity at awkward and random times, when it won’t have an obvious use.

So it will need to be stored!

One sensible method energy storage is to use the electricity to electrolyse water or brine to produce hydrogen and other gases. The hydrogen is then stored and can be burnt or used in a fuel cell to generate heat and/or electricity.

I can see a lot of innovation being employed to create hydrogen filling stations for users, such as companies with large fleets of smaller vehicles, railway companies, emergency power sup lies and other applications.

Unlike the production of hydrogen using steam-reforming of methane, electrolysis using renewable energy doesn’t produce any carbon dioxide.

Tees Valley Rail Interventions

The report talks of these interventions.

  • Darlington station upgrade.
  • Middlesbrough station upgrade.
  • Teesport To Northallerton gauge clearance.

One of the main reasons for doing this, is that it will improve access to Teesport, which will bring wide benefits to the North.

Integration Of Traffic Management To Improve Air Quality

This is from the report.

Air quality is a major health problem across the world – especially in major cities. Vehicle emissions are the major contributor to this problem – particulate matter and nitrogen oxides cause numerous health problems, including asthma and lung cancer. Road transport accounts for at least 50 per cent of these emissions – and this is likely to be an underestimate (Cox and Goggins 2018). Clearly the volume of traffic is the principal cause, but so is the ‘stop/start’ of traffic flows, which tends to further increase emissions (O’Brien et al 2014). Exhaust fumes aren’t the only source – 60 per cent of particulate matter emissions come from the tyres and brakes.

Suggestions to reduce emissions include.

  • Freight priority schemes
  • Bus or cycle priority at signals to encourage transport modal change.
  • Change signal timings to improve air quality
  • Inform the public to change travel plans when air quality is poor.
  • Low emission zones

Some of these measures will go down like a lead balloon.

Tees Crossing

This is from the report.

Roads are essential for the internal operation of Tees Valley’s economy and in order to connect it to the wider North. Passenger rail connectivity remains poor and light rail is non-existent. The economy’s residential and employment centres are highly dispersed across its geography. A modern bus network might relieve pressure, but the deregulated and underfunded network has seen passenger numbers fall and services cut (Brown 2018). The level of freight activity in Teesport and Hartlepool mean that these ports are highly dependent on the road network as well as rail.

The proposed solution js to build another road bridge across the Tees.

Conclusion

It seems a package of sensible measures, but opposition to some may ean they are not implemented.

 

 

 

 

 

 

March 19, 2019 Posted by | Transport | , , , | Leave a comment

A Station For Leeds/Bradford Airport

When I wrote The Glasgow Airport Rail Link Will Be A Tram-Train, I put in a section about the rail link to Leeds/Bradford Airport.

I had just read this article on the BBC is entitled Leeds Bradford Airport railway station one of three planned.

This is said.

The proposed new station about one mile (1.6km) from the airport would also act as a park and ride for commuters to Leeds and Harrogate.

I wonder if the trains at Leeds/Bradford Airport will go the last mile?

Even if the link is not electrified, why can’t we imitate the train/trams in Zwickau, that I wrote about in Riding The Vogtlandbahn.

A diesel multiple unit like a Class 172 train, refurbished for Airport and Park-and-Ride duties could leave the Harrogate Line at the Park-and-Ride and then proceed under tram rules on a dedicated track to a tram-like station at the Airport.

The needed infrastructure would be simple, with no electrification and stations built like the simple affairs on the London Tramlink, with no bridges.

A Typical Two Platform Stop

Why not?

Obviously, the ideal solution would be to electrify the Harrogate Line and have trains run into the airport using onboard energy storage.

My only worry about the concept is that of an Airport Link doubling as a Park-and-Ride.

It would need careful capacity planning and be designed so that more frequent and longer trains could be accommodated if the need for more capacity arose.

After all, we don’t know if Yorkshire will vote to exit England!

 

February 6, 2017 Posted by | Transport | , , , | 1 Comment

The Glasgow Airport Rail Link Will Be A Tram-Train

This article on the BBC is entitled Plans for direct tram-train link between Glasgow Airport and city.

This is the three opening paragraphs.

Plans to create a “tram-train” link between Glasgow Airport and the city centre have been unveiled.

The £144m Glasgow Airport Access Project could see journey times cut to 16.5 minutes and would bypass the need to use the busy M8.

It would involve a specially-designed hybrid tram-train using the existing railway network and on-street tracks.

That sounds like a sensible plan.

What Is A Hybrid Tram-Train?

As I said in Were The New Merseyrail Trains Designed In A South London Pub?, I believe that Stadler have designed a rail vehicle, that can.

  • Be equipped to run on any of the electrified rail lines in the UK.
  • Run as a train on heavy rail lines such as that between Glasgow Central and Paisley St. James stations, where it would use 25 kVAC overhead electrification.
  • Run as a tram on a dedicated tram track to the Airport, built without electrification, using onboard energy storage charged on the journey on the electrified line between Glasgow and Paisley.
  • Provide step-free access by making sure that the trains fit the platforms, which would all be built to the same height.

I believe that the trains could be a version of those that Stadler are building for Merseyrail. After all, the Swiss company are already building special trains for the Glasgow Subway.

How Many Trains?

As it takes about sixteen minutes between Glasgow Central and Paisley St. James stations., one train would probably provide an hourly service.

But obviously, things do go wrong, so at least two trains would be needed, with one as a spare or in maintenance.

Two trains could provide two trains per hour (tph), with four trains needed to  provide 4 tph.

Trains, Infrastructure And Costs

Merseyrail is paying £9million for each similar four-car train, which includes extras like maintenance.

The only differences would be.

  • Glasgow’s trains would be 25 kVAC trains, whereas Merseyrail’s are 750 VDC third-rail trains.
  • Interior fit and colour scheme.

Note that Stadler have said that the Merseyrail trains can have 25 KVAC equipment and batteries fitted.

I would buy five trains to provide a four tph service, with one as a spare or in maintenance.

This would leave around £100million for the only new infrastructure, which will be a rail spur to the airport from the West of Paisley St. James station station on the Inverclyde Line.

This spur could be built along the following lines.

  • Single- or double-track.
  • On-street or dedicated fenced off track.
  • No electrification.
  • Traditional signalling or in-cab.
  • Simple stations like the tram stops in Birmingham, Croydon, Edinburgh or Nottingham.
  • Step-free level access.

I think a single-track bi-directional track would work, but space should probably be left for double track, if it proves very popular.

It might be better to think of the rail spur as a long well-landscaped siding, which just happens to end within a few metres from an airport terminal.

I think that this link could be built inside the allocated budget of £144million.

Other Airport Links

Note that if this works for Glasgow, what about Bristol, Cardiff, East Midlands and Leeds/Bradford and Liverpool Airports?

Leeds/Bradford Airport

This article on the BBC is entitled Leeds Bradford Airport railway station one of three planned.

This is said.

The proposed new station about one mile (1.6km) from the airport would also act as a park and ride for commuters to Leeds and Harrogate.

I wonder if the trains at Leeds/Bradford Airport will go the last mile? It would need the Leeds-Harrogate Line to be electrified, but it would give the Airport the high-class rail link it needs.

Liverpool Airport

I believe that Merseyrail’s new trains, have the capability to serve Liverpool Airport in the same manner, in which the Glasgow Airport Rail Link could be built and operated.

There are more details here in Thoughts On Merseyrail’s New Trains.

Conclusion

Stadler will sell a lot of these trains to provide links into places like airports and town-centres.

 

 

December 20, 2016 Posted by | Transport | , , | 3 Comments

Tram-Trains Recommended For Leeds-Bradford Airport Link

This report on Global Rail News is entitled Tram-train preferred for Leeds Bradford Airport link, which probably says most of it.

This Google Map shows the cities of Bradford and Leeds and the airport to the North.

Bradford, Leeds and Leeds-Bradford Airport

Bradford, Leeds and Leeds-Bradford Airport

And this map shows the airport and the surrounding area from Guiseley in the North West to Horsforth in the South East.

Leeds Bradford Airport

Leeds Bradford Airport

Both towns have stations.

If you need to travel between the two towns by rail, you need to change trains at Leeds.

The consultants report recommends that to link Leeds to the airport a tram-train link be built from Horsforth.

This Google Map shows the countryside between Horsforth station and the southern end of Leeds-Bradord Airport.

Horsforth To Leeds-Bradford Airport

Horsforth To Leeds-Bradford Airport

Horsforth station is in the South East corner of the map.

It would seem to not be the biggest engineering project to construct the airport link.

Although, it should be born in mind, that the area around and between Leeds and Bradford is not by any means flat and pilots of light aircraft are usually cautious on the approach to the airport, because the terrain causes all sorts of winds and updraughts.

This Google map shows the country between Guiseley and the northern end of Leeds-Bradford Airport.

Guiseley To Leeds-Bradford Airport

Guiseley To Leeds-Bradford Airport

Guiseley station is in the North West corner of this map.

It would probably not be as easy to built a link from Guiseley to the airport, that could handle tram-trains, as to build one from Horsforth.

Years ago, the Otley and Ilkey Joint Railway planned to create a railway from Guiseley to Horsforth via Yeadon, but it was never built and the Yeadon Branch was closed to all traffic in 1964.

It would be ironic, if tram-trains were to reconnect Guiseley and Horsforth via Leeds-Bradford Airport, along the route of the Yeadon Branch.

If a route from the airport to Guiseley could be built for tram-trains, then they could carry on to Bradford Forster Square station, thus giving Bradford direct access to the airport.

March 1, 2016 Posted by | Transport | , , , | Leave a comment