The Anonymous Widower

Monetarising The Freedom Pass

I find my Freedom Pass extremely valuable and I’m extremely grateful for it, as I can’t drive after a serious stroke, that left me with eyesight problems.

But I feel Freedom Pass use could be expanded, to improve the efficiency of London’s transport network and generate some much needed cash flow for Transport for London.

Some Principles

What I am proposing here will obey these principles.

  • Charges will only occur, when the card is used in conjunction with a bank card to buy tickets or services.
  • Any tickets or services bought through the Freedom Pass system, will be at the best possible price.

But the major principle will be that if a Freedom Pass holder continues to use their card as they do now, they will not pay any charges.

An Updated Web Site

The current web site at www.freedompass.org is mainly for information only.

This function could be increased, but I also think the website could be extended in several ways.

A Personal Profile

Some pass holders might like to add a personal profile with perhaps a photograph and selected personal details, next of kin and some medical details.

Obviously, creating a profile would be at the pass holder’s discretion.

Journey Logging

I believe that with Oyster, you can check where you’ve been on a ticket machine.

Some Freedom Pass holders might like to have a similar facility on a web site.

Railcard Management

If you have a Freedom Pass, the site will know if you are over a certain age or have a qualifying disability. I would actually get a Freedom Pass, even if I wasn’t quite as old, as my eyesight was deemed not good enough to drive.

So the Freedom Pass web site could prompt you when you needed to renew your Railcard.

Adding A Bank Card To A Freedom Pass

To get between Dalston Junction and Gatwick Airport stations, I need to buy a ticket from the Zone 6 Boundary to the Airport. It would be very handy, if a Freedom Pass could be linked to a bank card, so that there was no need to buy an extra ticket. The few pounds to get to the Airport, would be automatically charged to the linked bank card.

I would not need to buy a ticket and would just touch in at Dalston Junction station and touch out at Gatwick Airport. My bank card would be charged a few pounds.

The link would also work, where a journey was done before the 09:30 start time of Freedom Pass on many routes.

So if Esmerelda, who lived in Camden wanted to get to Orpington to walk her grandchildren to school., she would be able to use the Freedom Pass for a normal fare, which would be charged to her bank card.

I would assume that Transport for London would pick up a small commission for the National Rail tickets.

A Ticket Buying Web Site

Depending on the company, the rules for using Freedom Passes with National Rail tickets aren’t always simple.

Yesterday, I went to football at Ipswich and bought a return ticket between Harold Wood and Ipswich stations.

  • Harold Wood is the Zone 6 boundary.
  • I was also able to get on a Liverpool Street to Norwich train, despite it not stopping at Harold Wood.
  • As a Greater Anglia ticket inspector told me off for not doing this about six months ago, when he saw my Freedom Pass alongside my Senior Railcard, when he checked my tickets, I feel it must be right.

But I don’t think all train companies are so accommodating.

Suppose you were able to buy any rail ticket on the Freedom Pass web site and I wanted to buy a return ticket on a Saturday from Dalston Junction to Ipswich.

  • Logging in, the site would know I had a Freedom Pass and a Senior Railcard.
  • I would ask for my ticket and then the web site would find my cheapest ticket.
  • I would pay for it as one does on any of the numerous rail ticket web-sites.

But it would probably add a third orange ticket, giving my route and conditions.

Should Ticket Buying Be Limited To Freedom Pass Holders?

If you are a London resident, would you use a trusted ticket buying web site from Transport for London, where you knew any profits would be reinvested in London’s transport network?

If it was a best price, I would!

Conclusion

The right design of web site could be a nice little earner for Transport for London.

Or any other regionalised transport organisation, like Transport for Wales or Merseytravel.

December 23, 2018 Posted by | Transport | , , , | Leave a comment

Oyster Card Scheme Extension Agreed

The title of this post is the same as that of this article on the BBC,

This paragraph describes the extensions.

Its extension, due in early 2019, will include Hertford North, Welwyn Garden City, Luton Airport Parkway and Epsom.

As the Oyster Card extension will also include intermediate stations, the following stations will be included on the four routes.

  • Hertford North – Crews Hill, Cuffley and Bayford.
  • Luton Airport Parkway – Radlett, St. Albans City and Harpenden
  • Welwyn Garden City – Potters Bar, Brookmans Park,Welham Green and Hatfield

All intermediate stations to Epsom are already in the Oyster Card Scheme.

Fourteen new stations will be added.

These are a few random thoughts.

Contactless And Oyster

Oyster card and most contactless payment methods with a card or mobile device can be used on Oyster Card reader, so in this post, I will use contactless to cover all methods.

I believe that in a few years, Oyster could be phased out, as cards and mobile devices will take over the ticketing.

Luton Airport Parkway

Adding Luton Airport Parkway station to the network, brings Luton Airport in line with Gatwick and Heathrow Airports.

This is very much a logical extension.

Airport Services

This is a list of the current times for airport services from London.

  • Gatwick – Express – 29 minutes – Thameslink – 39-60 minutes
  • Heathrow – Express – 15 minutes – Crossrail – 28 minutes
  • Luton – East Midlands Trains – 21 minutes – Thameslink 30-47 minutes
  • Southend – 52-53 minutes
  • Stansted – 49-52 minutes

If you look at the passenger statistics for Gatwick Airport station, they have been rising at around a million passengers a year for the past few years. How much of the recent rises have been due to the station going contactless in January 2016?

Certainly, if you’re late for a plane, contactless ticketing might save a couple of minutes.

I always remember an incident at Southend Airport station.

My plane was late and arrived very close to the departure time of the last train to London. There had recently been a lot of arrivals and the queues for tickets were long.

So a Greater Anglia employee took the decision to tell everybody to get on the train and we all went to London without tickets.

If ticketing had been contactless, Greater Anglia might have collected some fares.

But contactless at an airport is not solely about making money, but getting the passengers away from the airport quickly.

Hertford East And Hertford North Stations

Hertford East station accepts contactless cards.

Adding the facility to Hertford North station may open up some journey possibilities and ease ticketing.

The National Rail web site recommends that to go between Ware and Bayford stations on either side of Hertford, that you walk between the East and North stations.

An anytime ticket will cost you £19.50.

But buy two separate tickets between Ware and Hertford East stations and Hertford North and Bayford stations and it’ll cost £6!

Using contactless ticketing and touching in at all stations will save £13.50! Will this cost difference encourage more journeys with a walk in the middle?

When I visited the Hertford East Branch recently in mid-morning, I thought that it was surprisingly busy. Does lower-hassle contactless ticketing encourage more passengers?

Analysis of contactless touches will provide the answers to my two questions.

St. Albans City And St. Albans Abbey Stations

The Abbey Line between Watford Junction and St. Albans Abbey stations is not contactless, although Watford Junction station is so enabled and St. Albans City station will be.

There is surely a case for adding contactless ticketing to this short line of five intermediate stations.

Welwyn Garden City Station

Enabling Oyster on the route to Welwyn Garden City station, will mean that all stations on the Great Northern Route from Moorgate station will be enabled except for Watton-at-Stone  and Stevenage.

This would surely be less confusing for passengers, than the current arrangement, where Oyster tickeing is stopped at Hadley Wood and Gordon Hill stations.

Hopefully a suitable announcement would wake-up accidental fare avoiders at Hertford North station.

Epsom Station

The two routes to London from Epsom station are both fully Oyster-enabled, so surely adding one station to the routes shouldn’t be a difficult problem technically.

Further Routes For Oyster

Distances of the new Oyster-enabled stations, with a few existing ones, by rail from Central London are as follows.

  • Epsom – 16 miles from Victoria.
  • Gatwick Airport – 26 miles from Victoria
  • Hertford North – 20 miles from Moorgate
  • Luton Airport Parkway – 29 miles from St. Pancras
  • Shenfield – 20 miles from Liverpool Street
  • Welwyn Garden City – 20 miles from Kings Cross

So what other stations could be added?

Southend And Stansted Airports

Airports seem to like Oyster and as I said earlier, it can help to sort out ticketing problems at certain times.

  • Southend Airport station is 39 miles from Liverpool Street and there are five other stations between Southend Airport and Shenfield stations.
  • Stansted Airport station is 36 miles from Liverpool Street and there are six other stations between Southend Airport and Broxbourne stations.

This story on ITV is entitled Rail Minister Urged To Roll Out Oyster Card Payments To Stansted, Luton And Southend Airports.

Luton Airport will soon be Oyster-enabled, so hopefully Stansted and Southend Airports will be enabled soon.

Thirty Miles From London

There are a lot of places within thirty miles of London on commuter routes, that I’m sure eventually will be Oyster-enabled.

  • High Wycombe and Aylesbury – Chiltern have ambitions for this.
  • Rochester – 30 miles from London and on Thameslink.
  • Windsor

There will be other suggestions.

Extending Freedom Pass

I’d like to be able to just touch-in and touch-out to go to any station in the Oyster card area.

My Freedom Pass would be connected to a bank or credit card and I would be charged beyond the Freedom Pass area.

If Oyster cards can be linked to a bank or credit card, surely London’s control computer can be programmed to do something very powerful for Freedom Passes.

It could be a nice little earner for cash-strapped Transport for London.

Conclusion

Oyster is extending its reach and after this flurry of extensions in the next few months, lot of places will be wanting to be Oyster-enabled.

I suspect the only objector to this roll-out, will be the RMT, who have made the Luddites look like pussycats!

 

 

 

December 15, 2018 Posted by | Computing, Transport | , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Freedoming

Over the last couple of weeks, I have been asked out to lunch, coffee or a drink by several old and new friends, who live in towns and cities outside of London’s Zone 6 boundary.

I have also visited several places for my own purposes.

The Zone 6 boundary is important, as I can travel there using my Freedom Pass.

So to get to these towns, I need to buy an extension ticket from the Zone 6 boundary.

Some of these are extremely good value if you use a Senior Railcard,

  • Bishops Stortford – £7.00
  • Hertford East – £5.80
  • Uckfield – £9.25
  • Woking – £5.35

These prices are all for Off Peak Day Returns.

What Are My Objectives?

I am not really sure at the moment, but I do like travel, good food, visiting museums and galleries, looking at old and modern engineering.

So it may just be a load of old rubbish, but it will also be fun!

August 26, 2018 Posted by | Transport | , , | Leave a comment

What Is Most Important In A Train Service?

I am prompted to ask this question after my trips on the reopened Gospel Oak to Barking Line (GOBlin), which I wrote about in Along The Reopened Gospel Oak To Barking Line.

These are my thoughts on what is important in a train service.

Clean And Tidy Trains And Stations

London Overground is a network of nine lines and 112 stations and the operator makes sure that everything is clean and tidy.

Also unlike many rail lines in the world, it is very rare to find any graffiti on trains or inside stations on the Big Orange.

I’ve only ever seen one example of spray paint on a train, in the seven years, that I’ve used the Overground.

So what is it, that enforces the good behaviour?

I don’t know, but even on a crowded train, I’ve never seen any anti-social behaviour.

Could it be that the clean, practical environment of the trains and stations discourages it? Perhaps it has just been designed out?

Remember that stations are the marketing or retail face of the trains.

Would you buy your supper, clothes or household goods from a badly-designed and scruffy shop?

You wouldn’t!

And you didn’t buy much from BHS, Blockbuster, Comet or Woolworths either!

The Size, Quality And Type Of Trains

My fellow passengers on my GOBlin trips, didn’t seem bothered about the quality of the Class 172 trains., but a couple did say that four-car trains would be welcome, as overcrowding on the line can be a problem.

But I do wonder if you have a quality train of the right size and performance, does it matter what  method is used to power the train, so long as it is reliable.

I also think that if you asked a selection of users and residents by the line, that electric trains would be fasvoured on noise grounds, but some would object to gantries marching along the line in a sensitive area.

It should be noted, that one of the reasons for electrifying the GOBlin, is so that freight trains can be electric-hauled, which is preferable for environmental reasons, of which diesel locomotive noise is very prominent.

The Number And Quality Of The Stations

More and higher quality stations are a sound policy, that is only limited by the budget.

Many recently opened stations, like Dalston Junction, Galashiels, James Cook, Oxford Parkway and Southend Airport have been a success, as like most new stations, they’ve built to fulfil a perceived need!

In addition, stations like Deptford,  Hampstead Heath and Lower Edmonton have also shown an increase in patronage after upgrading with lifts and a refurbished  building.

A cynic might say, that Network Rail’s Access for All program is not just about passenger needs but more about getting more people  to ride in trains to generate revenue.

But the outcome is the same for those with special travelling needs.

A Turn-Up-And-Go Service

One lady of a certain age, I met yesterday, said she’d never used the GOBlin before and as she’d heard it was running again, she thought she’d give it a try, as she fancied a walk on Hampstead Heath.

Since, it was taken over by London Overground, the short line has been running four trains per hour (tph) in both directions, which is what London Overground, Merseyrail and other operators would consider a Turn-Up-And-Go-Service for an urban route.

If you just miss a train, then you only have to wait a maximum of fifteen minutes for another train.

But to be an efficient Turn-Up-And-Go Service other things are needed.

Contactless Ticketing

My fellow traveller was  like me, travelling on a free Frredom Pass, which means we just touched in and went on our way. But in London, I actually carry two other valid tickets as two of my credit/debit cards are contactless. I use one of these, when I’m travelling to Gatwick Airport, as it is outside the Freedom Pass area, but inside London’s contactless ticketing area.

, Surely when you use a line like the GOBlin, be it in London, Birmingham, Glasgow, Liverpool, Leeds, Manchester, Newcastle, Paris or Zurich, you shouldn’t have to buy a ticket if you have a contactless debit or credit card.

These days with modern technology, no-one should not have to do anything more than touch in and touch-out with a contactless bank card to use a local transport network; based on bus, tram or train.

Operators that don’t embrace this contactless bank card route and insist you buy a separate card or download an app to your new Nokia 3310 are Luddites of the worst kind.

Getting To And From The Station

Efficient Turn-Up-And-Go also needs enough car and bike parking and/or well-documented bus links.

Tea And Coffee Kiosks

London Overground also like to add good tea and coffee kiosks into their Turn-Up-And-Go mix, often using very independent operators.

If you do miss that train, you might as well take your caffeine fix!

 

 

March 2, 2017 Posted by | Transport | , , , | Leave a comment

Platforms 13 And 14 At Paddington Station

These pictures show work at Platform 13 and 14 at Paddington station.

It looks like they’re being tidied up and lengthened, so that when in 2018 Heathrow Connect is transferred to Crossrail, the platforms can be used by the 200-metre long Class 345 trains.

It will only be a temporary arrangement as in 2019, Heathrow Connect trains will use the core tunnel under London.

  • 4 tph between Abbey Wood and Heathrow Terminal 4.

There will also be 4 tph on Heathrowc Express from Psaddington to Hrathrow Terminal 5.

So it looks Heathrow will be trying to con passengers to use the expensive Heathrow Express. Edpecially from Terminal 5!

It is only continuing to fleece passengers, as it is totally pointless for savvy travellers.

Quite frankly, if you’re anywhere to the East of Paddington, would you change at Paddington to waste money, when a change at Heathrow Central will be free?

It would be far better to run 8 tph to the Airport, with four tph going to each of Terminal 4 and Terminal 5. Four tph could start at Shenfield and four tph at Abbey Wood.

And then there’s the problem of vFreedom Passes. Will I be able to use my pass on Crossrail to get to Heathrow?

January 7, 2017 Posted by | Transport | , , , , | Leave a comment

The Price Of Freedom

I had a tidy up this morning and found a lot of orange rail tickets.

Orange Rail Tickets

Orange Rail Tickets

These tickets are some Singles, but mainly Returns to places on the fringes of London.

  • Aylesbbury Vale Parkway £9.65 ReturnBedford £12.00 Single
  • Cambridge £10.25 Single
  • Dorking £3.25 Return
  • Gerrards Cross £4.05 Single
  • Gillingham £6.25 Return
  • Henley-on-Thames £6.85 Return
  • Leatherhead £2.65 Return
  • Maidstone £7.20 Return
  • Marlow £5.70 Return
  • Milton Keynes 12.60 Return
  • Oxford £11.90 Return
  • Oxted £2.80 Return
  • Rochester £5.55 Single
  • Seaford £14.15 Return
  • Slough £2.85 Return
  • Swanley £2.45 Return
  • Tilbury £2.45 Single
  • Uckfield £8.85 Return
  • Windsor and Eton Riverside £5.20 Single
  • Working £5.15 Return

Some of these journeys may seem better value than you can get.

But then as I live in London and have a Freedom Pass, which gives me free travel to the Zone 6 Boundary of London’s travel system, so I’m buying a ticket from that boundary to my destination, which I then buy with a discount, as I have a Senior Railcard.

I also live close to Dalston Junction station, which is one of an increasing number of stations, where you can purchase a ticket from the Zone 6 boundary to a large number of stations, in a ring around London, in a ticket machine without resource to either the Internet or a Ticket Office.

What would be better, would be able to associate a bank card with my Freedom Pass and Senior Railcard. So if I used the bank card as a ticket, like millions do across London every day, it would deduct the cost of my travel to the Zone 6 boundary, that I get free with my Freedom Pass, and then charge me accordingly.

An Estate Agent, who I meet on the street by my house and with whom I often have  a quick chat, believes that inward migration of older people into London is driven by the following factors.

  • Availability of quality housing, that is comparable in price  to a large residence in a good location in the countryside.
  • Free public transport for most over sixty-five. Even if you weren’t born in the UK
  • Lots of free museums and galleries.
  • Lots of paid for events, culture and attractions.
  • World-class free healthcare.
  • The ability to live without a car.

The last time we met, he told me how he’d just sold a French couple a quality two-bedroom house round the corner to help get round some of France’s tax and inheritance rules.

Who’d have thought that London would be a place where people retire?

But then since about 2000, my late wife, C and myself had planned to sell-up in Suffolk at some time and move to somewhere like Hampstead.

Sadly, she didn’t make it, so I came by myself to the more edgy and plebian Hackney.

But I don’t regret the change of location one iota.

Where will I explore today?

June 11, 2016 Posted by | Transport | , | Leave a comment

Contactless Between East Croydon and Gatwick Airport

I recently travelled to Gatwick Airport and went via East Croydon station, which is a Zone 6 station and thus Freedom Pass territory for lucky Londoners like me!

I used my Freedom Pass to get to East Croydon, by changing at New Cross Gate from the East London Line.

At East Croydon, I found myself on the well-appointed Platform 5, with its coffee stall, waiting room, information booth and toilets.

The only thing that the platform lacks is an Oyster reader, so that those like me, who need to touch-out and touch-in again, as they are changing from a Zone 6 ticket to contactless for Gatwick Airport, don’t have to walk up and through the barrier.

Incidentally, for those like me who have a Freedom Pass, there is an interesting anomaly. After going through the barrier, I then re-entered the station using my AMEX card, before catching a Bognor Regis/Southampton Central service to Gatwick Airport.

At Gatwick I entered the Airport using my AMEX card and when I checked the statement I found that I’d been charged three pounds for the journey.

Coming back, I bought a ticket in a machine from Gatwick Airport to East Croydon and I was charged three pounds and forty-five pence.

So contactless cards may be cheaper! And the return ticket used my Senior Railcard!

I shall have to travel between East Croydon and Gatwick Airport on a Gatwick Express and see how much I’m charged.

It would seem to me that for Freedom Pass holders, the cheapest way to get to Gatwick, is to use the pass to get to East Croydon, exit the station and then re-enter the station using an Oyster or contactless bank card.

It’s just a pity, there isn’t an Oyster reader on the platform at East Croydon, so that those changing for Gatwick at the station can touch out and touch in again.

But this simple exercise showed that for those wanting to go to Gatwick, using contactless ticketing is the way to go.

February 13, 2016 Posted by | Transport | , , , | 1 Comment

Glasgow Bin Lorry Driver Should Have Been Charged

According to this article on the BBC web site, a former prosecutor has said that the driver of the Glasgow bin lorry, that killed six people should have been charged. The report starts like this.

A former senior prosecutor has strongly criticised the decision not to charge the driver at the centre of the Glasgow bin lorry tragedy.

Brian McConachie QC said there was sufficient evidence to prosecute Harry Clarke.

He said the Crown Office had “jumped the gun” in not pressing charges.

I feel very strongly about this. After I had my stroke, my eyesight was terrible and I decided that to start driving again would not be a responsible thing to do.

My current GP, who has seen me for three years, feels that if I wanted to, I could get my licence back.

But quite frankly I couldn’t be bothered. And I have a lot of backing from my healthy bank account.

What worries me, is how many other Harry Clarkes are there driving around?

In the last four years, I had lifts from other drivers a few times and quite frankly with two of them my eyesight seemed better.

My eyesight problem incidentally, is that I can’t see moving objects low down on the left. So one nightmare on the street, is meeting a crocodile of young children, say being led by their teachers. Luckily I haven’t done anything I shouldn’t! A few times though, people wheeling cases have pulled in front of me from the left and I’ve bumped into the case. Only once have I ended up on the ground, as usually my balancing skills which are still tip-top have got me out of trouble.

Harry Clarke was extremely irresponsible, in not reporting his failing health problems!

Incidentally, if say I was fifty and had got my eyesight problem, as I live in London, I would get a Freedom Pass, entitling me to free public transport in Greater London. I get one anyway as I’m over the qualifying age.

August 21, 2015 Posted by | Health, Transport | , , , | 1 Comment

The Easiest Way To Get To Ipswich For Tuesday Night Football

Tuesday night football at Ipswich, and probably Colchester, is a difficult and overly expensive journey, when you have to trouble out for a kick-off at 19:45 using the crowded trains of the rush hour, which charge you more for your pleasure.

Normally if I want to go to Ipswich on a Saturday, it costs me £26.25 for an Off Peak Return from Liverpool Street with a Senior Railcard. But last night, on a Tuesday it would have cost me £50.65.

But Crossrail has come into play with the takeover of the Shenfield Metro by TfL Rail, which means I can use my Freedom Pass to Shenfield for nothing. Younger people, using Oyster or contactless cards have seen a reduction in cost, which some publicity claims is 40%.

So last night, as I had to stop off at Forest Gate on the way, I took TfL Rail to Shenfield in the rush hour.

I then exited the station, had a coffee in one of several nice independent cafes around the station and then re-entered after buying a return ticket from Shenfield to Ipswich, which got me to the ground at a convenient time for the match.

It was all very civilised and for most of the way, I had a seat and was able to sit comfortably and read the paper, as most of the other passengers had departed by Witham.

And for this I paid the princely sum of £16.75, which is approximately a third of the regular price. Here’s the proof.

London To Ipswich For £16.75

London To Ipswich For £16.75

I shall be going this way again, especially as I have friends in Shenfield, with whom I could share a drink.

This is a substantial benefit to anybody living in London with a Freedom Pass, who needs to go to anywhere in the South Eastern portion of East Anglia.

You’ve always been able to buy tickets from the Zone 6 Boundary, but the trouble with that is Harold Wood, which isn’t as well connected as Shenfield. You also have difficulty buying these tickets on-line and usually have to go to a booking office.

If you don’t have a Freedom Pass, using contactless cards to Shenfield on TfL Rail and then using an onward ticket from Shenfield may well be cheaper for the whole journey.

Of course, if you bought your onward ticket from Shenfield before you travelled, all you would do is get off one train at Shenfield and get on another to your ultimate destination.

The only drawback is that the journey via Shenfield is slower.

Currently, Ipswich is about 70 minutes from Liverpool Street, but when the Norwich in Ninety improvements are completed, I think we could see this time reduced to 60 minutes or even less. New trains with sliding doors would help too!

Shenfield is 43 minutes from Liverpool Street at the moment, but Crossrail will reduce this by a couple of minutes. Ipswich is probably an hour past Shenfield, but Norwich in Ninety must reduce this.

The biggest change could come when Crossrail opens and there is a new East Anglian rail franchise. If I was bidding for the new franchise, I would stop a proportion of the fast London-Colchester-Ipswich-Norwich trains at Stratford, Romford or Shenfield to interface with Crossrail, so that the journeys for passengers were optimised to get as many on board as possible., to maximise my company’s profits and hopefully my bonus.

Norwich in Ninety plus Crossrail can only mean that house prices in East Anglia will continue to rise.

August 19, 2015 Posted by | Transport | , , , , , , | 1 Comment

The New Freedom Pass Map

This document on the Transport for London web site, is the latest definitive map of where I can roam with my Freedom Pass.

The big addition for me is Shenfield, as although I don’t go there often, I could use it as the station to get my train for football at Ipswich.

I would have to change trains twice, but I could still arrive on the same 13:43 train into Ipswich.

But by using TfL Rail to Shenfield and then Abellio Greater Anglia from there, my Saturday Off-Peak Return, drops from £26.25 to £16.75, which is a saving of £9.50.

Similar savings even occur for a Tuesday evening match, as the cheapest fare drops from £28.70 to £19.35. It would also appear that you just buy an Off Peak Return, which is a saving in aggravation.

I’m only working on the current timetable, but I suspect that a new Anglia franchisee in a couple of years time, might stop all of the Ipswich and Norwich trains at Shenfield for Crossrail. It will probably be quicker to go from Liverpool Street, but there will be a lot of possibilities for saving money.

I also suspect that, when Crossrail opens, then Reading, like Heathrow and Shenfield, will appear on the Freedom Pass map, so instead of going to Paddington, will I join trains to Wales and the West Country at Reading.

The biggest effect on the economy of the spreading of the Freedom Pass, will be that more and more retirees will move into the capital, thus fuelling the rise in house prices.

So perhaps the best way to spend that pension pot is to buy a place in London.

 

June 4, 2015 Posted by | Transport | , , , | Leave a comment