The Anonymous Widower

Greater Anglia Completes Directly-Managed Norwich Victoria Sidings Project

The title of this post is the same as that of this article on Railway Gazette.

This is the introductory paragraph.

Greater Anglia has opened four sidings able to stable 12-car trains just outside Norwich station, with its first train using the facility on March 3.

Other information can be found in this and other articles.

  • It was Greater Anglia’s biggest infrastructure investment to date.
  • The sidings are on the South side of the Trowse Swing Bridge, that crosses the River Wensum.
  • The project took nine months to complete.
  • The sidings look to be fully electrified.

I would assume that each siding can take one of the following.

  • A twelve-car Class 745 train, which are 236.6 metres long.
  • A ten-car Class 720 train, which are 240 metres long.
  • Two five-car Class 720 trains, which are 122 metres long.
  • More than one Class 755 trains, which are 65 metres long (3-car) and 81 metres long (4-car)

They will certainly be able to pack in the trains.

 

April 4, 2020 Posted by | Transport | , , , , | Leave a comment

A New Stansted Express Train At Liverpool Street Station

I took these pictures yesterday of a new Stansted Express train at Liverpool Street station.

Note that it is numbered 106 on the front. The leading one indicates a Class 745/1 train or one for use on Stansted Express.

The Class 745 train data sheet is now on the Stadler web site, which gives a lot of interesting data.

For instance, it gives the train’s mean acceleration between 0 and 40 mph as 0.9 m/s².

This compares with the following.

The maximum acceleration for a Hitachi AT-300 train given on this page of their web site as 0.75 m/s².

The acceleration of a Class 345 train is given as up to 1 m/s².

Eversholt give the acceleration of a Class 321 Renatus as 0.6 ms².

It looks to me that Class 745 trains have a quick getaway, but not as quick as the Crossrail trains.

But they do appear to be faster off the mark than the Hitachi trains.

 

April 4, 2020 Posted by | Transport | , , | 3 Comments

A Class 755 Train PowerPack Car

The picture shows the PowerPack car of a Class 755 train.

Note.

  1. The two covers to give access to the two engines on each side of the car.
  2. The shared Jacobs bogies between the cars.
  3. The pairs of shock absorbers between cars.

The Jacobs bogies and the shock absorbers are probably used to help give the trains a smooth ride. The Wikipedia entry for Jacobs bogies says this.

Instead of being underneath a piece of rolling stock, Jacobs bogies are placed between two carbody sections. The weight of each car is spread between the Jacobs bogie. This arrangement provides the smooth ride of bogie carriages without the additional weight and drag.

After my half-dozen or so rides in Class 745 and Class 755 trains, I wouldn’t be averse to seeing a lot more of these trains in the UK.

 

March 17, 2020 Posted by | Transport | , , | Leave a comment

First Time On A Saturday

Yesterday, after a dreadful match at Ipswich, I came back to London in a new Class 745 train.

I have a feeling, this was the first time that the trains have been running with passengers on a Saturday.

They really are seriously good trains!

I shall be interested to see how the number of passengers increase between London and Norwich via Chelmsford, Colchester and Ipswich.

February 2, 2020 Posted by | Transport | , , | Leave a comment

My First Ride In A Class 745 Train

I took these pictures as I took a ride in a new Class 745 train between Liverpool Street and Colchester.

These are my thoughts on various subjects.

Seating

I found no problem with the seats in Second Class, although there have been reports, that they are harder than those of the Mark 3 coaches.

I came back from Colchester in one of British Rail’s finest products and prefer the new train.

Note that in both cases I had a seat with a proper table, so I was comparing like with like.

In the Class 745 train, I was sitting in one of the higher seats over a bogie and I like this position with its better view, which I have also used in the smaller bi-mode Class 755 trains, that are used for local services in Norfolk and Suffolk.

These higher seats, which are in groups of four are a good design solution to maintaining the level floor in the train over the bogies and with their large windows, I feel they would be ideal for families.

You are also slightly isolated from the rest of the train, so could be ideal for a group of people wanting to have a slightly confidential meeting on the train.

Do you get some of the advantages of a compartment, without any of the inconvenience for train operators and passengers?

This article on Rail Magazine is entitled First Pictures: Greater Anglia Reveals Interior Of New Intercity Fleet.

This paragraph describes the seating.

The ‘745/0s’ feature 752 seats (672 in Standard Class and 80 in First Class) compared to the 614 on existing nine-car sets (528 in Standard and 86 in First Class), while they retain the 2+2 seating in Standard Class and 2+1 in First Class. There is space for 245 standing passengers.

Greater Anglia claims there is the maximum padding allowed under stricter fire regulations.

First Class Seats

First Class looks spacious and the seat was better, as I stole a quick try, as I walked through.

If Greater Anglia continue Weekend First, I shall pay the extra if Ipswich lose on the way home.

Tables

In First Class all seats have proper tables and in Standard Class, there are more proper tables than in the Mark 3 coaches.

I didn’t check, but it appears most airline seats in Standard Class have a seat back table. As the Mark 3 coaches are well-provided with seat back tables, there would be protests, if the new trains aren’t the same.

I actually counted the number of four-place tables in Standard class and found their were forty-three pairs of tables on either side of the aisle.

As each table has four seats, this means that 344 seats in Standard Class have a full size table.

This means that just over half of Standard Class seats have a full size table.

In the old Mark 3 rakes of coaches, there are five Standard Class coaches, which each have seventy-four seats, which gives a total of 370 seats.

I feel that at most times of the day, nearly all Standard Class passengers will get a seat with a full-size table.

Greater Anglia seem to be giving passengers on their premium service a lot more space.

The Buffet

I only passed through the buffet, when the train was in Liverpool Street station and it was closed.

So I didn’t get to see the food and drink offering.

The buffet is placed between First and Standard Class, which is where it should be.

Walk-Through Train

The Class 745 train is the UK’s first walk-through express train, with a nearly level floor from end to end.

You can even walk through the equipment sections in the middle of the train, where the two halves join.

At very nearly 237 metres long, it is over thirty metres longer than Crossrail’s Class 345 trains, so the Class 745 trains must be the UK’s longest walk-through trains.

Note that a twelve-car Class 321 train is just over 239 metres long, with a twelve-car Class 360 train at 244 metres.

But these trains are not walk-through.

 

Catering Trolley

One benefit of the level walk-through floor, is that it must be easier for staff to push the catering trolley through the train.

As, it came through on both trips, it looks like Greater Anglia are doing the right thing with catering in both First and Standard Class.

However, I did meet a steward, who wasn’t looking forward to pushing a trolley all that way!

Ride Quality

I had no complaints, although not everyone likes sitting on top of the bogie, as it can be choppy.

It should be noted that like the bi-modes, the train has yaw dampers between carriages.

Note the second one lower down! That is not engineering by accountants!

Does these improve the ride? I didn’t ask Greater Anglia to take them off and have another trip!

Step-Free Access

One of my gripes with many trains is the large step to get in or out of the train.

Compare this picture, which shows a Class 717 train at Moorgate station, with this second picture of the step on a Class 745 train at Colchester.

Note too, the wide-double door, which is much more like that of a high-capacity commuter train, than an express designed for two-hour journeys.

I appreciate these touches, as I could have been in a wheel-chair after my stroke.

But the Devil thought I’d be a troublemaker, so she gave me a second chance and threw me back!

A Driver’s View

Sitting opposite was a Greater Anglia driver having his first trip on a Class 745 train.

He was training to change from Class 321 trains to the bi-mode Class 755 trains and seemed genuinely enthusiastic to get driving his new charges.

But he said the best feature of both fleets of new trains from a driver’s point of view in the acceleration and he showed me an impressive video, which compared the acceleration of the old and new trains.

This acceleration will save a few minutes,

He was also very interested in hydrogen power, so I told him about my adventures in the North of the Netherlands.

Performance

When Norwich-in-Ninety services started in May 2019, I wrote Norwich-In-Ninety Is A Lot More Than Passengers Think!.

I described a ride from Norwich to London in ninety minutes in the Mark 3 coaches hauled by a Class 90 locomotive, where for much of the route, we were cruising at the route’s maximum speed of 100 mph.

Today, the Class 745 train was at 100 mph for long periods and appeared to be running easily.

But then a Class 745 train, has a power output of 5,200 kW compared with the 3,730 kW of a Class 90 locomotive. The new train may have twenty-three percent more seats, but it also has nearly forty percent more power.

This is certainly one reason for the acceleration, shown in the driver’s video.

Various fast trains can be compared.

  • Pendelino Class 390/0 – 125 mph – 9 cars – 469 seats – 5,100 kW
  • Pendelino Class 390/1 – 125 mph – 11 cars – 589 seats – 5,950 kW
  • Class 745 – 100 mph – 12 cars – 747 seats – 5,200 kW
  • Class 755 – 100 mph – 4 cars – 229 seats – 2,600 kW
  • Class 801 – 125 mph – 9 cars – 611 seats – 4,000 kW
  • InterCity 125 – 125 mph – 8 cars – 514 seats – 3,400 kW
  • InterCity 225 – 125 mph – 9 cars – 535 seats – 4,700 kW

Note.

  1. Except for their 100 mph, the Class 745 fit well into the table.
  2. They have more seats than any other trains in the table.
  3. They have more power than a Class 801, an InterCity 225 and the short Pendelinos.
  4. The bi-mode Class 755 trains are no wimps either.

Both the Class 745 and Class 755 trains really are high-powered Swiss rockets.

Could they go faster?

There are 120 mph Flirts running in Norway, but the maximum speed on the Great Eastern Main Line is only 100 mph, so they couldn’t run any faster there.

But a senior Greater Anglia driver told me, that the bi-mode Class 755 trains have been designed for 125 mph.

As an engineer, this is not unexpected, as Europe has a plethora of rail lines with a 200 kph or 125 mph operating speed, that have branches that extend to sizeable towns and cities that need an improved rail service.

In the UK, think of LNER’s recently introduced services to Lincoln and Harrogate, where there is a 125 mph electric dash on the East Coast Main Line and a diesel trundle to the destination.

As the two classes of Greater Anglia  trains and the Norwegian Flirts seem to use the same running gear, is there lucking in that body a cheetah wanting to be unleashed.

If so, the Hitachi trains have a serious rival!

But could the Class 745 trains go faster on the Great Eastern Main Line?

For periods yesterday, the Speedview app on my phone, was showing a steady 100 mph. But the route to Colchester is crowded with 100 mph commuter trains, which probably preclude faster running.

But get North of Ipswich and in a few months, the only non-Flirt traffic, will be the freight trains to and from Felixstowe, which use the Great Eastern Main Line on the fifteen miles between Ipswich and Haughley Junction.

The Northern section of the Great Eastern Main Line has two major bottlenecks.

  • Haughley Junction, which needs remodelling to handle the large numbers of freight trains.
  • Trowse swing bridge and its single track, which needs replacing with a proper bridge and a double track.

Both projects are under development by Network Rail.

However, between the two bottlenecks, the track was built for Victorian high speed. and is reasonably straight across flat country, with one station and a few level crossings.

Currently, the Norwich-in-Ninety trains can achieve the following.

  • Norwich and Haughley Junction, which is 32 miles,  in around 26 minutes at an average speed of 73 mph.
  • Norwich and Ipswich station, which is 46 miles,  in around 35 minutes at an average speed of 79 mph.

Note there is a stop at Diss, where the Class 745 trains might save a few seconds because of their level access and fast acceleration.

Whilst the two major projects at Trowse and Haughley Junction are carried out, will Network Rail improve the track between Ipswich and Norwich to allow faster running.

Being able to average 100 mph between Norwich and Ipswich would knock several minutes off the journey time.

Conclusion

Hitachi have a serious competitor.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

January 10, 2020 Posted by | Transport | , , | Leave a comment

Greater Anglia Launches New Intercity Trains On Norwich-London Route

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Rail Magazine.

The first Class 745 train to enter service left Norwich this morning at 0740 and arrived in Liverpool Street on time at 0924.

There is a more informative article in the East Anglia Daily Times, which is entitled East Anglia’s New Intercity Train Carries Its First Passengers.

Points include.

  • There is a cafe bar and First Class accommodation.
  • I’ve read elsewhere, there will be a trolley service.
  • All ten trains are expected to be in service by the end of March.
  • They will be introduced at a rate of one train per week.
  • Introduction will enable services run by older trains to be run by eight or nine carriages.
  • There are wide passages between carriages.
  • Seats are firmer than the older carriages.
  • Passengers liked the headrests.
  • Wi-fi is getting good reports.
  • Lots of charging points.
  • Step-free access is very good.
  • On-board toilets are fine.
  • One passenger said there were more tables.
  • Another passenger thought the new trains better than the old ones.

Inevitably these new trains will be compared with Hitachi’s Class 802 trains and other members of the family.

Operating Speed

These Stadler trains and the bi-mode Class 755 trains are only 100 mph trains, as that is the maximum speed anywhere in East Anglia.

But a driver told me, that both trains are designed for 125 mph and as some of their European siblings, run at that speed in service, I have no reason to disbelieve him.

On the other hand, the Hitachi trains are capable of 125 mph or 140 mph, where in-cab digital signalling is installed.

Train Length

The lengths of the two trains are as follows.

  • A nine-car Class 802 train is 234 metres long.
  • A twelve-car Class 745 train is 236.6 metres long.

The difference won’t matter much, whre it concerns, the stations, that the trains can serve.

Passenger Entry

Doors are different on the two trains.

  • A nine-car Class 802 train has two single doors on each side of the car or 18 single doors per train on each side.
  • A twelve-car Class 745 train a pair of double doors on each side of the car or 24 doors per train on each side.

Train-And-Platform Step

This picture shows the step across in a Class 802 train.

And this picture shows the step across in a Stadler Class 745 train.

All trains should have an entry like this at all platforms.

Passenger Capacity

  • A nine-car Class 802 train holds 576 standard, 71 First or 647 total passengers.
  • A twelve-car Class 745 train holds 757 total passengers, including some First Class.

The Greater Anglia train holds seventeen percent more passengers in a train of the same overall length.

Do passengers sit in each other’s laps?

No! I suspect it’s all down to good design.

Exit From A Full Train

Many InterCity trains arrive at their destination full and passengers are in a hurry to get on with their journey.

  • A full nine-car Class 802 train has 35 passengers per single door, a narrow lobby and a step down onto the platform.
  • A twelve-car Class 745 train has 62 passengers per double doors, a more spacious lobby and level access to the platform.

I shall be watching as a Class 745 train unloads 757 passengers at Liverpool Street station in the Peak.

C

 

January 8, 2020 Posted by | Transport | , , , | Leave a comment

The Cuckoo In The Nest

Look at these pictures of the passenger doors on Hitachi Class 802 trains, InterCity 125 trains and Mark 3 coaches.

All are single end doors at the two ends of the car.

But look at this pair of doors on one of Greater Anglia’s new Class 745 trains.

The doors are in the middle of the car.

  • Each car is only twenty metres long, as opposed to the twenty-six metres of a Class 802 train.
  • The pictures don’t show if the trains are fully walk-through.
  • They are also step-free between train and platform, which can’t be said for many trains.

I can’t wait to have a ride, which will hopefully be in a few weeks.

This is the comparison between a twelve-car Class 745 train and a nine-car Class 802 trains.

  • The Class 745 train is 237 metres long, and the Class 802 train is 225 metres long.
  • The Class 745 train has 757 seats and the Class 802 train has 647 seats.
  • The Class 745 train has 3.2 seats per metre and the Class 803 train has 2.9 seats per metre.
  • The pair of double doors on a Class 745 train will have to unload 64 passengers, when a full train arrives in Liverpool Street
  • The Class 745 train is step-free between train and platform, so buggies, baggage and wheel-chairs can be wheeled out.
  • The pair of single doors at each end of the car on a Class 802 train will have to handle 75 passengers, when a full train arrives at the destination.
  • The Class 902 train is not step-free between train and platform, so buggies, baggage and wheel-chairs will have to be lifted out!
  • The Class 745 trains running between Liverpool Street and Norwich via Ipswich will have a buffet.

Will the Stadler trains load and unload quicker than the various Hitachi trains?

 

December 8, 2019 Posted by | Transport | , , , | Leave a comment

A First Close-Up View Of A Class 745 Train

I was standaing on Stowmarket station and this Class 745 train came through.

These twelve section trains will replace stakes of Mark 3 coaches, sandwiched between a Class 90 locomtives and driving van trailers.

Note.

  1. When I first saw the train, I thought it was a Class 755 train., as they look so similar. So I had to read the plate between the trains to check.
  2. Unlike most UK trains the number on the cab is not a full number and just the last three digits.
  3. If you look at the top of the train, it appears that the energy bus appears to be along the middle of the roof.
  4. Like most modern trains, they were quiet. Does this suggest efficient aerodynamics.

It bcertainly appears that Stadler have a selectio of sections, that can be connected together to create the trains.

November 25, 2019 Posted by | Transport | , , | Leave a comment

Vere Promises East Midlands Bi-Modes In 2022

The title of this post is the saqme as that of this article on Rail Magazine.

This is the first paragraph.

East Midlands Railway will have its entire bi-mode fleet in traffic by December 2022, according to Baroness Vere, the Government’s transport spokesman in the House of Lords.

This statement means that whoever manufactures the trains has just over three years from today to design, build and test the trains.

This paragraph from the article talks about how Bombardier and Hitachi would design the trains.

It’s known that Bombardier and Hitachi are interested in the contract, but both will be supplying new designs, with the former offering a bi-mode Aventra while the latter will offer an AT300 (the Intercity Express Programme platform) but with shorter vehicles.

What do we know about these two trains?

Bombardier Bi-Mode Aventra

In the July 2018 Edition of Modern Railways, there is an article entitled Bi-Mode Aventra Details Revealed.

As is typical with Bombardier interviews, they give their objectives, rather than how they aim to achieve them.

In Bombardier Bi-Mode Aventra To Feature Battery Power, I said this.

The title of this post is the same as this article in Rail Magazine.

A few points from the article.

  • Development has already started.
  • Battery power could be used for Last-Mile applications.
  • The bi-mode would have a maximum speed of 125 mph under both electric and diesel power.
  • The trains will be built at Derby.
  • Bombardier’s spokesman said that the ambience will be better, than other bi-modes.
  • Export of trains is a possibility.

Bombardier’s spokesman also said, that they have offered the train to three new franchises. East Midlands, West Coast Partnership and CrossCountry.

Very little more can be gleaned from the later Modern Railways article.

Consider.

  • Aventras are designed to a modular concept.
  • Bombardier have finally got the software for the train working to a high standard.
  • The trains are designed for ease of manufacture, at a high rate.
  • Development of the bi-mode train must have started before June 2018.
  • Christian Wolmar disclosed the objective of a 125 mph Aventra in February 2017.
  • I have seem references to Aventras, being tested at 110 mph.

On the balance of probabilities, I think it is very possible that Bombardier can deliver a full fleet of 125 mph bi-mode trains with batteries before the end of 2022.

Hitachi AT-300

Consider.

  • Class 802 trains are a version of the AT-300 train, which in turn are a member of Hitachi’s A-Train family.
  • Class 802 trains are successfully in service on the Great Western Railway.
  • Class 385, 395, 800 and 801 are all members of the A-train family and are closely related to the Class 802 train.
  • The A-Train is a modular family.and different numbers of cars and car length, shouldn’t be a problem.
  • Hull Trains ordered their fleet of five Class 802 trains in November 2016 and they will enter service around December 2019 or early in 2020.
  • First Group ordered five AT-300 trains in March 2019 and they will enter service in Autumn 2021.

If the order has been placed in the last few months, there is every chance that Hitachi could deliver a fleet of new bi-mode trains for service in December 2022.

Stadler Flirt

These aren’t mentioned in the Rail Magazine article, but they were mentioned as a possibility for the order in an article by Roger Ford, which was entitled East Midlands IC125 Dilemma, in the June 2019 Edition of Modern Railways.

This is an extract from Roger’s article.

In theory, Stadler should be in pole position. Itis also supplying Abellio’s Greater Anglia franchise, where Flirt bi-modes are running on test.

As they haven’t had any serious problems yet, and they are Swiss, everyone thinks they are amazingly efficient and wonderful. Whjich may turn out to be the case.

In the end, Roger rates their chances as slim.

But Stadler certainly has the technical capability to produce a 125 mph bi-mode train.

Electric Trains To Corby

When the electrified St. Pancras and Corby service opens in December 2020, a round trip will take three hours.

This means that as few as three trains would be needed to provide the service.

The specification would be.

  • Electric traction
  • Twelve cars and 240 metres long.
  • 125 mph capability.
  • Three trains and a spare would probably be needed by December 2020, with a further three trains by December 2021.

Abellio would also probably like the trains to be very similar for drivers and staff.

Currently, it appears that the electric services to Corby, will be run initially by cascaded Class 360 trains.

  • But with a bit of juggling of production, Bombardier, Hitachi and Stadler might be able to manufacture, the four trains needed to start the service in December 2020.
  • Abellio also have Class 360 and Class 379 trains working on Greater Anglia, that are likely to be replaced before December 2020.

So they have a sensible back-stop.

How Many Trains Will Abellio Need?

The current service is two trains per hour to both Nottingham and Sheffield.

These are fastest times.

  • London and Nottingham is one hour forty minutes
  • London and Sheffield is two hours

Even if there is a bit of a speed increase, it looks like at least eight trains will be needed for both services.

As to train length, I doubt five cars will be enough on all trains.

  • Some services are currently run by six and eight-car HSTs.
  • Have Abellio promised more seats?
  • Abellio will be extending some Sheffield services to Rotherham, Barnsley and Leeds.
  • It has already been stated that the Corby trains will be 240 metres long
  • So will we see a uniform fleet of longer trains?

There are some short platforms, so I suspect Abellio will buy a mixture of full-length 240 metre-long trains and half-length 120 metre-long trains, as several train companies have done.

I feel we could see something like eight full length trains and perhaps twelve half-length trains.

I have calculated that seven full-length trains are needed for Corby.

Adding this up gives the following.

  • Eight full-length bi-mode trains of ten-cars.
  • Seven full-length electric trains of ten-cars.
  • Twelve half-length bi-mode trains of five-cars

This gives a total of 27 trains of a total of 210 cars, of which 140 are bi-mode and 70 are electric.

All of this is based on running the current service with new trains.

abellio Greater Anglia have not not just done this in East Anglia, but have purchsed extra trains to add new services and increase frequencies.

So I would feel, that these trains are a minimum order, if Abellio are not doing any expansion.

Daily Telegraph Report – 19th July 2019

A report in the Daily Telegraph on the 19th July 2019, which is entitled Blow For Bombardier’s Derby Plant As £600m Train Contract Goes To Hitachi, says the order has gone to Hitachi.

  • Value is quoted at £600million.
  • A formal announcement is expected next week.

Has next week already passed without an announcement from Abellio?

I do find it strange, that there has been no reference to the Telegraph report in local sources around Derby.

This article on Railway Gazette is entitled Trains Ordered For 2021 Launch Of ‘High-Quality, Low Fare’ London – Edinburgh Service.

FirstGroup have ordered AT-300 trains.

  • All-electric.
  • Five trains of five-cars.
  • A total order value of £100 million.
  • Order placed in March 2019
  • Service starting in Autumn 2021

This works out at four million pounds per car.

Earlier, I calculated that Abellio needed to buy 140 bi-mode cars and seventy electric ones.

Assuming that Abellio run the Corby services with refurbished Class 360 trains, then 140 carriages will cost £560 million.

But this would mean the following.

  • Abellio would be running two separate fleets on the Midland Main Line.
  • The Corby services would run below the operating speed of the route.
  • Expansion would mean the purchase of more trains.

This is very different to their philosophy in Abellio Greater Anglia.

  • Class 745 and Class 755 trains are very similar to drivers and other staff.
  • Both trains can operate at 100 mph on the Great Eastern Main Line.
  • Abellio Greater Anglia have significantly increased the size of their train fleet.

I believe that Bombardier, Hitachi and Stadler can all met this schedule.

  • Deliver four 125 mph electric trains by a date early enough for a December 2020 start for Corby services.
  • Deliver another three 125 mph electric trains by December 2021 for two trains per hour to Corby.
  • Deliver the fleet of 125 mph bi-mode electric trains by December 2022 for Derby,Nottingham, Sheffield and beyond.

At four million pounds for a car for a Hitachi train, this works out at £840 million.

So could it be, that Hitachi have thrown in a good discount to make sure of the order.

It will be very interesting, when Abellio announce their order.

Interim Trains

Baroness Vere also discussed the other trains on the Midland Main Line.

This was the final two paragraph from the article.

As it stands, the 12 High Speed Trains cannot operate in passenger traffic beyond December 31 2019 this year, as they will not meet new accessibility regulations.

When announcing the Abellio contract win in April, Government confirmed that four Class 180s would transfer from Hull Trains to EMR. There was also the possibility that the LNER HSTs could also transfer to the MML, although these do not meet the disability requirements either.

So what is going to happen?

It appears that the four Class 180 trains and the twenty-seven Class 222 trains of various lengths will have to manage.

But I do think, that Baroness Vere’s statement.

East Midlands Railway will have its entire bi-mode fleet in traffic by December 2022.

Is very welcome, as the HSTs will retire on the 31st December 2019 and there will be less than three years of a reduced fleet.

These points should also be noted.

  • In December 2020, when the electrification goes live and new electric trains start running between London and Corby, there will be a few more Class 222 trains available.
  • The Corby electric trains, will also add capacity between London and Kettering.
  • I don’t think it unlikely, that some other trains are rustled up to fill the gaps using perhaps Mark 4 coaches and Class 43 locomotives.

I hope for Abellio’s and their passengers sake, that what Baroness Vere said, comes true!

Could Abellio Go For A Safety-First Solution?

Consider.

  • Abellio Greater Anglia’s new Class 745, Class 755 and Class 720 trains are all running, if not years, but a few months late.
  • There has been nothing serious and Greater Anglia only has one fleet that is not PRM-compliant; the London and Norwich expresses.
  • Providing all goes reasonably well with the introduction of the new Class 745 trains, Greater Anglia’s fleet will be fully PRM-compliant, by the end of the year.

But if they had opted for off-the-shelf Hitachi Class 801 trains for London and Norwich, there might have been less worry. On the other hand, Hitachi way of making trains, by shipping the bodies from Japan probably doesn’t lead itself to high productio rates.

But for Midland Main Line services, Abellio East Midlands Railway aren’t looking at a large fleet of trains.

I estimate they could need.

  • Eight full-length bi-mode trains of ten-cars.
  • Seven full-length electric trains of ten-cars.
  • Twelve half-length bi-mode trains of five-cars

Now that Hitachi’s big orders are coming to an end, Abellio can probably be sure, they will get the main line trains on time and with the minimum of fuss.

Going the safety-first route of buying a fleet of Hitachi trains could deliver the trains that are needed urgently.

  • Four 125 mph electric trains by a date early enough for a December 2020 start for Corby services.
  • Another three 125 mph electric trains by December 2021 for two trains per hour to Corby.
  • A fleet of 125 mph bi-mode electric trains by December 2022 for Derby,Nottingham, Sheffield and beyond.

It might be a bit tight for the Corby electrics, but other trains that could work the route in the interim are available.

Abellio could do a lot worse than give Hitahi the order, if they could deliver early!

Conclusion

If any of the three train manufacturers can supply new trains for the St. Pancras and Corby service to the tight timetable, Abellio would surely be very pleased, as they would only have one train type to introduce on the route.

But I do think, that there is a possibility, that a good discount has won it for Hitachi!

 

 

 

July 26, 2019 Posted by | Transport | , , , , , , , , , , | 16 Comments

Aerial Pictures Show New Trains Housed In Mid-Norfolk

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on the Eastern Daily Press.

Greater Anglia has a storage problem for all the new trains being delivered from Stadler in Switzerland.

So the train operating company has done a deal with the Mid Norfolk Railway to store the trains in the depths of deepest Norfolk.

Wikipedia gives more details in a section, entitled Storage Of Main Line Stock.

Working with Abellio Greater Anglia, the Mid-Norfolk Railway have developed a rolling stock storage facility close to their Kimberley Park station. The £3 million sidings have been funded by Abellio Greater Anglia to allow them to store their Class 745 and 755 fleets until they are ready to be in service.

It has also been reported that the site, will be used to store the replaced trains, whilst they await new operators or the scrapyard.

This picture clipped from the Eastern Daily Press article, shows the trains.

Reading the Wikipedia entry for the Mid Norfolk Railway, which is obviously a well-maintained standard gauge heritage railway, it gets used for various rail-related training and other purposes, so as the multi-million pound deal shows, I’m pretty certain there is a lot of co-operation between all parties in Norfolk, including Greater Anglia, Network Rail, Balfour Beatty and the Emergency Services.

Will The Class 755 Trains Return With Passengers?

The following should be noted.

  • Rail tours and charters use the branch and visit Dereham, several times a year.
  • An InterCity 125 has even used the line.
  • Dereham is a town of 19,000 people.
  • Norfolk is a county, that welcomes lots of tourists.
  • Wymondham station will soon have a direct hourly service to and from Stansted Airport.

Given the co-operation between Greater Anglia and the Mid-Norfolk Railway over the train storage, where a long term conveniently-located facility is of benefit to both parties, will we see occasional visits of Class 755 trains to Dereham?

There must be long-term possibilities.

  • Weekend steam trains between Dereham and Norwich, similar to the Shakespeare Express, that runs between Birmingham Snow Hill and Stratford stations.
  • A limited commuter service between Dereham and Norwich.

The Mid-Norfolk Railway’s long term ambition to extend their route past Dereham to reopened stations at County School and Fakenham, would surely increase the viability of these services.

 

July 20, 2019 Posted by | Transport | , , , , | 1 Comment