The Anonymous Widower

Plan For £8.25m Plymouth Energy Plant To Generate Power From Cream-Like Fluid

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on PlymouthLive.

These two paragraphs outline the project.

Plymouth’s Hemerdon tungsten mine has been chosen as the site of a pioneering £8.25m hydro energy plant which would see a cream-like fluid used to generate electricity. London-based renewable energy company RheEnergise wants to start construction of the High-Density Hydro storage system at the Plympton site as early as summer 2023.

The company has already spoken to the parish council and is to submit plans to Devon County Council soon. It hopes permission will be given and the site will be in operation by the end of 2023 and then trialled for two years before the technology is rolled out nationally and worldwide.

Note.

  1. RheEnergise has a web page, which describes how their High-Density Hydro storage system works.
  2. The system is sized at 250kW/1MWh and is described in the article as a demonstrator plant.
  3. In the future, rojects will range from 5MW to 100MW of power and can work with vertical elevations as low as 100m or less.

This sentence from the article lays out the potential of the system.

RheEnergise’s analysis of potential project opportunities has indicated there are about 6,500 possible sites in the UK, about 115,000 in Europe, about 345,000 in North America and about 500,000 in Africa and the Middle East.

This method of storing energy could be very useful.

Where Is Hemerdon Tungsten Mine?

This is a Google Map of the Plymouth area.

The red arrow indicates the Hemerdon Tungsten Mine, which has a Wikipedia entry as Drakelands Mine, where this is said about the last three years.

Tungsten West plc, which floated on the London Stock Exchange’s Alternative Investment Market on 21 October 2021,[49] have taken over the mine. They have conducted a review starting from the basics, of what is required to fix the problems that caused Wolf Minerals to fail. A better understanding of the mineralogy, with associated changes to the processing stream, and aggregate sales should lead to the mine re-opening at scale in 2022.

Tungsten West’s share price has had an up-and-down day. But are they adding energy storage to their income streams?

From the map, it does seem to be a possibility.

 

November 29, 2022 Posted by | Energy, Energy Storage | , , , | 1 Comment

Reports: Ineos In Talks With Rolls Royce To Build Nuclear Plant At Grangemouth Refinery

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on The Chemical Engineer.

These are the first two paragraphs.

INEOS is reportedly in talks with Rolls Royce about using its small modular nuclear reactor (SMR) technology to power the Grangemouth refinery in Scotland.

The Sunday Telegraph first reported the story, citing sources with knowledge of the discussions who claimed that early-stage talks between the companies have centred on the technology and that commercial negotiations are yet to take place.

This paragraph, also gives a useful summary of how large scale chemical plants can use low carbon energy.

Ineos is not the first chemicals major to explore using new nuclear plants to provide low-carbon power to help decarbonise its heavy operations. Options include raising low-carbon heat for use in chemicals processing and electrolysing water to produce hydrogen for use as chemical feedstocks. In August, Dow announced it will install SMRs from X-energy to provide power and process heat for its chemicals production on the US Gulf Coast.

It is interesting to note that Dow are also exploring the use of SMRs to power a large chemical plant.

This paragraph gives an assessment of the possible view of the Scottish government.

Scotland has set a target to achieve net zero emissions by 2045 – five years earlier than UK legislation. While the Scottish Government is opposed to new nuclear using current technologies it has said that it will assess how novel technologies might contribute to Scotland’s low carbon future.

So perhaps it is not the total opposition, that some would expect.

In the 1960s, when I worked at ICI, I can remember reading an article in a serious magazine about nuclear plants being used in chemical plants and for steelmaking. This application has taken a long time to come to fruition.

November 28, 2022 Posted by | Energy | , , , , | Leave a comment

AVL RACETECH Builds Hydrogen Combustion Engine For Motorsport

The title of this post, is the same as that as this article on Hydrogen Central.

This is the opening paragraph.

AVL RACETECH, the motorsport department of AVL, presents the prototype of an innovative H2 internal combustion engine. The power unit is a compact, hydrogen-powered 2-liter turbo engine, with intelligent water injection that enables it to achieve a totally new performance level. The prototype is the first racing engine that AVL RACETECH is developing and building in-house.

Note.

  1. The engine has a size of two litres.
  2. It generates about 150 kW/litre.
  3. It features water injection.
  4. It appears to be very interesting technically and has been designed with extensive computer simulation.

AVL RACETECH has a web site, which gives more information.

November 28, 2022 Posted by | Energy, Hydrogen, Transport/Travel | , | 2 Comments

Highview Power In The Daily Express

This article in the Daily Express is entitled The Storage Sites Around The UK That Could Provide Cheap Power To Millions Of Homes.

Highview Power gets a large mention for its plan for twenty storage sites around the UK.

This is said about their planned sites at Carrington and on Humberside.

It is hoped that the first plant, a £250million Manchester station, will come online as early as 2024. It will have a 30megawatts capacity, able to store 300megawatt hours of electricity, enough to supply 600,000 homes with clean power for an hour.

The next plants will be even larger in scale, with four a five planned for Humberside with a 200megawatt/2.5gigwatt hour capacity. The CRYOBattery site would be able to store excess energy generated by the Dogger Bank, Hornsea and Sofia wind farms.

There is also a comprehensive map, with sites indicated at places like Aberdeen, Anglesey, Inverness, Liverpool, Montrose, Norfolk and Sizewell.

The sites seem to be following the wind, which is where excess power needs to be stored and released, when the wind is on strike.

November 27, 2022 Posted by | Energy, Energy Storage | , , | 1 Comment

Small Nuclear Power Plants To Replace Gas In Quest For Net Zero

The title of this post is the same as that of this article on The Times.

I was very much involved in the writing of project management software in the last three decades of the last century and if there’s one thing we’re generally good at in the UK, it’s complex project management.

Usually problems arise because of political or ignorant senior management meddling.

Our Energy Saviours

I believe our two energy saviours will be floating offshore wind and small nuclear reactors (SMRs) and both need good project management to be built successfully on production lines.

So I don’t see any reason, why we can’t build large numbers of floating offshore wind farms to supply our electricity.

They are also complimentary, in that the fleet of SMRs back up the wind.

Floating Wind First

Floating wind is likely to be developed at scale first, as certifying anything involving nuclear will take an inordinate time.

The electricity from floating wind farms will keep us going, but it is also starting to develop a nice line in exports.

This press release from Drax is entitled Britain Sending Europe Power Lifeline – Report, where this is the sub-title.

For the first time in over a decade, Britain became a net exporter of electricity to its European neighbours, making around £1.5bn for the economy in three months.

Note.

  1. The report was written by Imperial College.
  2. Two new interconnectors; Viking Link and NeuConnect between the UK and Europe are under construction.
  3. Several large wind farms are under construction and will be commissioned in 2023/24 and could add over 4 GW to UK electricity production.

Exports will only get better.

A Sprint For Wind

So we must have a sprint for wind, which will then provide the cash flow to allow the SMRs to roll in.

Or will that be too much for the ultra-greens, who would object to cash-flow from GWs of wind being used to fund SMRs?

November 26, 2022 Posted by | Energy | , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

The Celtic Cluster Launches New Regional Strategy To Maximise Offshore Wind Benefits

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on offshoreWIND.biz.

This is the sub-heading.

The Celtic Sea Cluster has released a new Regional Strategy that outlines how Wales and South West England can maximise floating offshore wind technology benefits, in line with the forthcoming Celtic Sea leasing process being delivered by the Crown Estate.

Who comprise the Celtic Cluster? This paragraph gives the answer.

According to the Cluster, which is led by its founding partners, the Welsh Government, Cornwall, Isles of Scilly Local Enterprise Partnership, Celtic Sea Power, Marine Energy Wales, and the Offshore Renewable Energy Catapult, the strategy will allow the region’s stakeholders to ensure their activities are aligned and can achieve their common objectives.

I am surprised the Irish aren’t involved politically.

  • The Irish Republic has a coastline on the Celtic Sea.
  • There are a lot of Irish companies, finance and engineers involved in wind farm development.

But the cluster does have a firm ambition, according to the article.

The Cluster’s ambition is to establish the Celtic Sea region as a world leader in floating offshore wind by 2030 and to deliver 4 GW of floating wind in the Celtic Sea by 2035, with the potential to grow to 20 GW by 2045.

Note.

  1. The Wikipedia entry for the Celtic Sea, gives the sea an area of 300,000 km2.
  2. 20 GW or 20,000 MW is to be installed by 2045.

That is an energy density of just 0.067 MW/km2.

In ScotWind Offshore Wind Leasing Delivers Major Boost To Scotland’s Net Zero Aspirations, I calculated that ten floating wind farms had an average energy density of about 3.5 MW per km².

I wouldn’t bet against a few more floating wind turbines being squeezed into the Celtic Sea.

 

November 25, 2022 Posted by | Energy | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

World’s First 16 MW Offshore Wind Turbine Rolls Off Production Line

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on offshoreWIND.biz.

This is the subtitle and the first paragraph, that add some detail.

The first nacelle for a 16 MW offshore wind turbine jointly developed by China Three Gorges Corporation and Goldwind Technology has rolled off the production line at Fujian Three Gorges Offshore Wind Power International Industrial Park in China.

According to China Three Gorges, the unit has the largest single capacity, the largest rotor diameter, and the lightest weight per megawatt in the world.

The West, is going to push hard to make sure, we don’t give away another industry to the Chinese.

November 24, 2022 Posted by | Design, Energy | , | Leave a comment

Google Buys Scottish Offshore Wind Power

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on offshoreWIND.biz.

This is the sub-heading and the first paragraph.

ENGIE and Google have entered into a 12-year, 100 MW corporate power purchase agreement (CPPA) supporting the Moray West offshore wind development in Scotland.

ENGIE will provide Google with more than 5 TWh of green power from the Moray West project, a nearly 900 MW offshore wind farm set to begin generating power from 2025.

Increasingly, it seems that large energy users are committing themselves to long-term energy deals.

One of Google’s senior people is quoted as saying.

People across the UK and Europe are increasingly worried about climate change and energy security. We share that concern and believe technology is an important part of the solution – both by reducing our own emissions, and by helping others to reduce their own.

I have a few thoughts.

How Much Of Moray West’s Output Is 5 TWh?

Consider.

  • Moray West has an maximum output of 882 MW.
  • This converts to 7.73 TWh.

If Google are buying all the electricity produced by the wind farm, that would mean that the capacity factor is around 64.7 %, which is quite reasonable, if a bit high for a fixed foundation wind farm.

If we are, it does surely reflect a desire for stability and security in a fast-changing world.

Are We Seeing More Corporate Power Purchase Agreements (CPPAs)?

November 24, 2022 Posted by | Computing, Energy | , , , | 1 Comment

France’s First Offshore Wind Farm Fully Up And Running

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on offshoreWIND.biz.

This is the sub-title.

France’s first commercial-scale offshore wind farm, the 480 MW Saint-Nazaire, has been fully commissioned.

Does this mean, that this is France’s only operational offshore wind farm?

It does appear so, whereas the UK has 13,628 MW of offshore wind.

With onshore wind, the French have 15,000 MW and England has 14,000 MW.So we’re ahead in offshore and  total, but behind in onshore.

November 23, 2022 Posted by | Energy | , | Leave a comment

Norwegian Company To Power Data Centres With Offshore Wind

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on offshoreWIND.biz.

This is the sub-title.

Norwegian energy company Earth Wind & Power (EWP) is set to offtake up to 400MW of excess and pre-grid offshore wind power to supply electricity to data centre infrastructure in Northern Europe.

This sounds like a good idea.

Over the next few years, the UK will be ramping up our production of renewable energy.

Data centres could be an ideal way to make money from our excess energy.

November 23, 2022 Posted by | Computing, Energy | , , | Leave a comment